Search Results for "a-history-of-public-law-in-germany-1914-1945"

A History of Public Law in Germany, 1914-1945

A History of Public Law in Germany, 1914-1945

  • Author: Michael Stolleis
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand
  • ISBN: 9780199269365
  • Category: Law
  • Page: 489
  • View: 1334
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This history of the discipline of public law in Germany covers three dramatic decades of the twentieth century. It opens with the First World War, analyses the highly creative years of the Weimar Republic, and recounts the decline of German public law that began in 1933 and extended to the downfall of the Third Reich. The author examines the dialectic of scholarship and politics against the background of long-term developments in industrial societies, the rise of the interventionist state, the shift of state law and administrative law theory, and the emergence of new disciplines (tax law, social law, labour law, business administration law). Almost all the issues and questions that preoccupy state law and administrative law theory at the dawn of the twenty-first century were first pondered and debated during this period. Stolleis begins by emphasizing the long farewell to the nineteenth century and then moves on to examine the doctrine of state law and administrative law during the First World War. The impact of the Weimar Constitution and the of the Versailles Treaty on the discipline is discussed. Here the famous 'quarrel of direction' that occurred in the field of state law doctrine (1926-1929) played a central role. But equally important was the development of state law and administrative law theory (in both the Reich and its constituent states), administrative doctrine, and the jurisprudence of international law. Part two of the book is devoted to the impact of National Socialism. The displacement of Jewish scholars, the change of direction in the professional journals, and the shutdown of the Association of State Law Teachers form one aspect of the story. The other aspect is manifested in the erosion of public law and in the growing sense of depression that gripped its practitioners. In the end, it was not only state law that was destroyed by the Nazi experience, but the scholarly discipline that went with it. The author tackles questions about the co-responsibility of scholars for the Holocaust, and the reasons fwhy academic teachers of public law were all but absent in the opposition to the Nazi regime.

Public Law in Germany

Public Law in Germany

A Historical Introduction from the 16th to the 21st Century

  • Author: Michael Stolleis
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
  • ISBN: 9780198798965
  • Category: History
  • Page: 224
  • View: 8946
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German public law has been taught in universities since the early 17th century and continues to this day to be a dominant subject in German legal culture, especially in its modern incarnations of constitutional and administrative law, and European and international law. Michael Stolleis's Public Law in Germany: A Historical Introduction from the 16th to the 21st Century, expertly translated by Thomas Dunlap, provides an account of the fundamental developments in public law that situates current debates in the German Federal Constitutional Court as well as the role of the nation-state in Europe more broadly. It further examines the role of fundamental rights through the lens of Germany's special administrative courts and discusses their important role in the advancement of German law. Written with students in mind, the book distils Stolleis's masterful four-volume History of Public Law in Germany, the third volume of which (1914-1945) was published by Oxford University Press in 2004. It is an invaluable companion to the understanding of German public law more generally.

Carl Schmitt's State and Constitutional Theory

Carl Schmitt's State and Constitutional Theory

A Critical Analysis

  • Author: Benjamin Schupmann
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press
  • ISBN: 0192509322
  • Category: Law
  • Page: 232
  • View: 3699
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Can a constitutional democracy commit suicide? Can an illiberal antidemocratic party legitimately obtain power through democratic elections and amend liberalism and democracy out of the constitution entirely? In Weimar Germany, these theoretical questions were both practically and existentially relevant. By 1932, the Nazi and Communist parties combined held a majority of seats in parliament. Neither accepted the legitimacy of liberal democracy. Their only reason for participating democratically was to amend the constitution out of existence. This book analyses Carl Schmitt's state and constitutional theory and shows how it was conceived in response to the Weimar crisis. Right-wing and left-wing political extremists recognized that a path to legal revolution lay in the Weimar constitution's combination of democratic procedures, total neutrality toward political goals, and positive law. Schmitt's writings sought to address the unique problems posed by mass democracy. Schmitt's thought anticipated 'constrained' or 'militant' democracy, a type of constitution that guards against subversive expressions of popular sovereignty and whose mechanisms include the entrenchment of basic constitutional commitments and party bans. Schmitt's state and constitutional theory remains important: the problems he identified continue to exist within liberal democratic states. Schmitt offers democrats today a novel way to understand the legitimacy of liberal democracy and the limits of constitutional change.

The Making of a German Constitution

The Making of a German Constitution

A Slow Revolution

  • Author: Margaret Barber Crosby
  • Publisher: A&C Black
  • ISBN: 1859738176
  • Category: History
  • Page: 296
  • View: 4331
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It is impossible to comprehend the political development of the United States, England, or France without considering the US Constitution, English common law or the Code Napoleon, respectively. Why then has legalism been neglected in the study of German politics? Drawing on constitutional and legal history, this book reconsiders the creation of the German state and the nature of the 'bourgeois revolution'. The author reviews the critical time period of 1814-1930 to demonstrate the links between the legal code and political evolution. She argues that German liberals perceived that the ends of revolution could be achieved legislatively; thus Germany was able to attain a modern political and social system while avoiding - or at least delaying - violent movements. This book provides a ... republican synthesis of German political development through time.

Enemies of Mankind

Enemies of Mankind

Vattel’s Theory of Collective Security

  • Author: Walter Rech
  • Publisher: Martinus Nijhoff Publishers
  • ISBN: 9004254358
  • Category: Political Science
  • Page: 268
  • View: 8103
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In Enemies of Mankind Walter Rech offers a contextual history of the collective security doctrine articulated by Swiss international lawyer Emer de Vattel (1714-67) in the authoritative treatise Droit des gens of 1758.

From Empire to Union

From Empire to Union

Conceptions of German Constitutional Law since 1871

  • Author: Jo Eric Khushal Murkens
  • Publisher: OUP Oxford
  • ISBN: 0191652016
  • Category: Law
  • Page: 272
  • View: 4503
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Germany has long been at the centre of European debates surrounding the modern role of national constitutional law and its relationship with EU law. In 2009 the German constitutional court voted to uphold the constitutionality of the Lisbon Treaty, but its critical, restrictive decision sent shockwaves through the European legal community who saw potential threats to further European integration. What explains Germany's uneasy relationship with the project of European legal integration? How have the concepts of sovereignty, state, people, and democracy come to dominate the Constitutional Court's thinking, despite not being defined in the Constitution itself? Despite its importance to the whole enterprise of the European Union, German constitutional thought has been poorly understood in the wider European literature. This book presents a historical account of German conceptions of constitutional law, providing the understanding necessary to see what is at stake in contemporary debates surrounding the constitution and the European Union. Examining the modern development of German constitutional thought, this volume traces the key public law concepts of state, constitution, sovereignty, and democracy from their modern emergence in the 19th century through to the present day. It analyses the constitutional relationship between Germany and the EU from a sociological and historical perspective, looking at how German constitutional law has conflicted and compromised with EU law, and the difficulties this has raised. Filling a significant gap in comparative constitutional law literature, this book provides an account of the major schools of German constitutional thought and their development. Against this backdrop it offers a fascinating insight into Germany's relationship with the European Union.

Annual of German and European Law

Annual of German and European Law

Volume II and III

  • Author: Russell Miller
  • Publisher: Berghahn Books
  • ISBN: 1789206030
  • Category: Law
  • Page: 568
  • View: 2079
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German law has been of long-standing interest and increasing relevance around the world, but access for researchers and practitioners very frequently was limited by the necessity of German language proficiency. Offering English-language access to these fields, the Annual of German & European Law is a significant contribution to the global discourse on and study of German, European and Comparative law. Each volume presents: (1) articles – original, cutting-edge scholarship from the fields of German and European law; (2) jurisdictional reports – comments on the latest caselaw from Germany’s most significant courts and the case-law of the European courts having importance for Germany; (3) book reviews – surveying the most compelling recent literature (whether in the German or English language) in the fields of German and European law; and (4) translations – exclusive English-language versions of significant primary sources of German law, including statutes and court opinions). The first volumes of the Annual of German & European Law have attracted contributions from some of the most preeminent commentators, scholars and jurists in the fields, including, among others: Luke Nottage (Volume I); Juliet Lodge (Volume I); Alexander Somek (Volume I): Susanne Baer (Volume I): Renate Jaeger (Volume II): Günter Frankenberg (Volume II): Bootjan Zupanãiã (Volume II): Nigel Foster (Volume II) The third volume maintains this tradition of high quality, peer-reviewed scholarship with contributions expected from Gertrude Lübbe-Wolff (Justice, German Federal Constitutional Court) and Christian Joerges (European University Institute).

Scandinavian Studies in Law

Scandinavian Studies in Law

  • Author: Anders Victorin
  • Publisher: N.A
  • ISBN: N.A
  • Category: International law
  • Page: N.A
  • View: 6383
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German Yearbook of International Law

German Yearbook of International Law

Jahrbuch Für Internationales Recht

  • Author: N.A
  • Publisher: N.A
  • ISBN: N.A
  • Category: Constitutional law
  • Page: N.A
  • View: 5332
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Inventing the Criminal

Inventing the Criminal

A History of German Criminology, 1880-1945

  • Author: Richard F. Wetzell
  • Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press
  • ISBN: 0807861049
  • Category: History
  • Page: 376
  • View: 6823
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Recent years have witnessed a resurgence of biological research into the causes of crime, but the origins of this kind of research date back to the late nineteenth century. Here, Richard Wetzell presents the first history of German criminology from Imperial Germany through the Weimar Republic to the end of the Third Reich, a period that provided a unique test case for the perils associated with biological explanations of crime. Drawing on a wealth of primary sources from criminological, legal, and psychiatric literature, Wetzell shows that German biomedical research on crime predominated over sociological research and thus contributed to the rise of the eugenics movement and the eventual targeting of criminals for eugenic measures by the Nazi regime. However, he also demonstrates that the development of German criminology was characterized by a constant tension between the criminologists' hereditarian biases and an increasing methodological sophistication that prevented many of them from endorsing the crude genetic determinism and racism that characterized so much of Hitler's regime. As a result, proposals for the sterilization of criminals remained highly controversial during the Nazi years, suggesting that Nazi biological politics left more room for contention than has often been assumed.