Search Results for "a-history-of-the-university-of-manchester-1973-90"

A History of the University of Manchester, 1973-90

A History of the University of Manchester, 1973-90

  • Author: Brian Pullan,Michele Abendstern
  • Publisher: Manchester University Press
  • ISBN: 184779551X
  • Category: Education
  • Page: 352
  • View: 9661
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Frank and entertaining account of the University of Manchester's struggle to meet the Government's demands for the rapid expansion of higher education in the 1950s and the 1960s. Looks at the University's ambitious building program: the controversial attempts to reform its constitution and improve its communications amid demands for greater democracy in the workplace, the struggle to retain its old pre-eminence in a competitive world where new 'green field' universities were rivalling older civic institutions. Tells the story, not just from the point of view of administrators and academics, but also from those of students and support staff (such as secretaries, technicians and engineers). Uses, not only official records, but also student newspapers, political pamphlets, and reminisences collected through interviews conducted by an experienced oral historian. The only book on the University of Manchester as a whole.

The new treason of the intellectuals

The new treason of the intellectuals

Can the University survive?

  • Author: Thomas Docherty
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press
  • ISBN: 1526132761
  • Category: Education
  • Page: N.A
  • View: 4493
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This book delivers a damning criticism of the contemporary University system. It argues that the University has become politicised that its primary purpose has shifted from education to the advancement of market-fundamentalist capital, an ideology that paints society as a war of all against all for individual financial gain. Against this, the book calls for a reconfiguration of the purpose of the University. It evokes the institution's wider ambitions and purposes: extending the range of human possibilities, seeking global justice and promoting democracy. Nothing less than ecological and human survival is at stake. Written by a senior academic and leading opponent of the modern University regime, this book exposes a troubling present while remaining optimistic for the future. Essential reading for students and academics, policy-makers and anyone who cares about the state of higher education in the twenty-first century.

The Theological Education of the Ministry

The Theological Education of the Ministry

Soundings in the British Reformed and Dissenting Traditions

  • Author: Alan P.F. Sell
  • Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers
  • ISBN: 1621896781
  • Category: Religion
  • Page: 328
  • View: 6268
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Unwilling on conscientious grounds to submit to the religious tests imposed by the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge, the English and Welsh Dissenters of the second half of the seventeenth century established academies in which their young men, many of them destined for the ministry, might receive a higher education. From the eighteenth century onwards, theological colleges devoted exclusively to ministerial education were founded, while in Scotland historically, and in England and Wales over the past 120 years, freestanding university faculties of divinity/theology have provided theological education to ordinands and others. These diverse educational contexts are all represented in this collection of papers, but the focus is upon those who taught in them: Caleb Ashworth (Daventry Academy); John Oman (Westminster [Presbyterian] College Cambridge); N. H. G. Robinson (University of St. Andrews); Geoffrey F. Nuttall (New [Congregational] College, London); T. W. Manson (University of Manchester); Owen Evans (University of Manchester and Hartley Victoria Methodist College)--the lone Methodist scholar discussed here; and W. Gordon Robinson and J. H. Eric Hull (University of Manchester and Lancashire Independent College). Between them these scholars covered the core disciplines of theological education: biblical studies, ecclesiastical history, philosophy, doctrine, and systematic theology.

The State as a Firm

The State as a Firm

Economic Forces in Political Development

  • Author: R.D. Auster,M. Silver
  • Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
  • ISBN: 9401176272
  • Category: Political Science
  • Page: 208
  • View: 2904
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We seem to be witnessing the rebirth of the concept of an integrated social science, a complete theory of human action and interaction in all its ramifica tions and complications. What we call society is simply the totality of human exchange. Economics is a theory of human exchange of certain types. Although the qualities of what is being exchanged as well as the conditions of exchange may vary, economic theory has recently broadened its scope sufficiently to begin to be general enough to handle these problems as well. In the present work we attempt to see what insights are revealed by the application of economic categories to political history. We feel there are many. At this point Silver stops. ! Auster continues. A quick spin around the "policy" block in the new model so to speak, hence Chapter 8. For the rest, however, this is truly a joint work. The authors' names appear in alphabetical order. After 12 years of professional asso ciation, claims to precedence in origination could too clearly be self-deception. ! Silver is even more pessimistic than Auster, in particular about which types of reforms will be accepted. With the rise to affluence of most members of our society the mass itself has become concerned with political reform as almost a new form of entertainment. Unfor tunately, they have no idea how to improve matters.

Pioneer and Priest

Pioneer and Priest

Jesus Christ in the Epistle to the Hebrews

  • Author: R. J. McKelvey
  • Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers
  • ISBN: 1621895920
  • Category: Religion
  • Page: 274
  • View: 753
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The interest that Hebrews holds today is testimony to its enduring message. Central to its message is what Jesus Christ did and continues to do for his people. This is spelled out in arresting images. Dr. McKelvey provides new insight on Hebrews by demonstrating that two of its chief images - pioneer and priest - function not independently but in tandem. Christ is not pioneer without also being priest, and his priesthood is only properly understood in terms of the pioneer figure. Only one who is both pioneer and priest can provide the church with the help it needs. The double analogy in fact conveys the meaning of the Christian faith. This creative work takes account of the author's rhetorical style, showing how Hebrews is addressed to an urgent practical situation. It will appeal to those who want to know more about Hebrews as well as those who believe that the emerging church must follow Christ "outside the camp."

The Oxford Handbook of the Archaeology of Death and Burial

The Oxford Handbook of the Archaeology of Death and Burial

  • Author: Sarah Tarlow,Liv Nilsson Stutz
  • Publisher: OUP Oxford
  • ISBN: 0191650390
  • Category: Social Science
  • Page: 872
  • View: 5321
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The Oxford Handbook of the Archaeology of Death and Burial reviews the current state of mortuary archaeology and its practice, highlighting its often contentious place in the modern socio-politics of archaeology. It contains forty-four chapters which focus on the history of the discipline and its current scientific techniques and methods. Written by leading, international scholars in the field, it derives its examples and case studies from a wide range of time periods, such as the middle palaeolithic to the twentieth century, and geographical areas which include Europe, North and South America, Africa, and Asia. Combining up-to-date knowledge of relevant archaeological research with critical assessments of the theme and an evaluation of future research trajectories, it draws attention to the social, symbolic, and theoretical aspects of interpreting mortuary archaeology. The volume is well-illustrated with maps, plans, photographs, and illustrations and is ideally suited for students and researchers.

University Perspectives

University Perspectives

  • Author: John J. Knapp,Michael James Swanton,Frederick Raphael Jevons
  • Publisher: Manchester University Press
  • ISBN: 9780719004339
  • Category: Universities and colleges
  • Page: 297
  • View: 8837
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Empire of Cotton

Empire of Cotton

A Global History

  • Author: Sven Beckert
  • Publisher: Vintage
  • ISBN: 0385353251
  • Category: History
  • Page: 640
  • View: 4906
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The epic story of the rise and fall of the empire of cotton, its centrality to the world economy, and its making and remaking of global capitalism. Cotton is so ubiquitous as to be almost invisible, yet understanding its history is key to understanding the origins of modern capitalism. Sven Beckert’s rich, fascinating book tells the story of how, in a remarkably brief period, European entrepreneurs and powerful statesmen recast the world’s most significant manufacturing industry, combining imperial expansion and slave labor with new machines and wage workers to change the world. Here is the story of how, beginning well before the advent of machine production in the 1780s, these men captured ancient trades and skills in Asia, and combined them with the expropriation of lands in the Americas and the enslavement of African workers to crucially reshape the disparate realms of cotton that had existed for millennia, and how industrial capitalism gave birth to an empire, and how this force transformed the world. The empire of cotton was, from the beginning, a fulcrum of constant global struggle between slaves and planters, merchants and statesmen, workers and factory owners. Beckert makes clear how these forces ushered in the world of modern capitalism, including the vast wealth and disturbing inequalities that are with us today. The result is a book as unsettling as it is enlightening: a book that brilliantly weaves together the story of cotton with how the present global world came to exist.

Turks, Moors, and Englishmen in the Age of Discovery

Turks, Moors, and Englishmen in the Age of Discovery

  • Author: Nabil Matar
  • Publisher: Columbia University Press
  • ISBN: 023152854X
  • Category: History
  • Page: 288
  • View: 3187
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During the early modern period, hundreds of Turks and Moors traded in English and Welsh ports, dazzled English society with exotic cuisine and Arabian horses, and worked small jobs in London, while the "Barbary Corsairs" raided coastal towns and, if captured, lingered in Plymouth jails or stood trial in Southampton courtrooms. In turn, Britons fought in Muslim armies, traded and settled in Moroccan or Tunisian harbor towns, joined the international community of pirates in Mediterranean and Atlantic outposts, served in Algerian households and ships, and endured captivity from Salee to Alexandria and from Fez to Mocha. In Turks, Moors, and Englishmen, Nabil Matar vividly presents new data about Anglo-Islamic social and historical interactions. Rather than looking exclusively at literary works, which tended to present unidimensional stereotypes of Muslims—Shakespeare's "superstitious Moor" or Goffe's "raging Turke," to name only two—Matar delves into hitherto unexamined English prison depositions, captives' memoirs, government documents, and Arabic chronicles and histories. The result is a significant alternative to the prevailing discourse on Islam, which nearly always centers around ethnocentrism and attempts at dominance over the non-Western world, and an astonishing revelation about the realities of exchange and familiarity between England and Muslim society in the Elizabethan and early Stuart periods. Concurrent with England's engagement and "discovery" of the Muslims was the "discovery" of the American Indians. In an original analysis, Matar shows how Hakluyt and Purchas taught their readers not only about America but about the Muslim dominions, too; how there were more reasons for Britons to venture eastward than westward; and how, in the period under study, more Englishmen lived in North Africa than in North America. Although Matar notes the sharp political and colonial differences between the English encounter with the Muslims and their encounter with the Indians, he shows how Elizabethan and Stuart writers articulated Muslim in terms of Indian, and Indian in terms of Muslim. By superimposing the sexual constructions of the Indians onto the Muslims, and by applying to them the ideology of holy war which had legitimated the destruction of the Indians, English writers prepared the groundwork for orientalism and for the eighteenth- and nineteenth-century conquest of Mediterranean Islam. Matar's detailed research provides a new direction in the study of England's geographic imagination. It also illuminates the subtleties and interchangeability of stereotype, racism, and demonization that must be taken into account in any responsible depiction of English history.

Birth of the Leviathan

Birth of the Leviathan

Building States and Regimes in Medieval and Early Modern Europe

  • Author: Thomas Ertman
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press
  • ISBN: 1139936085
  • Category: History
  • Page: N.A
  • View: 7953
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For many years scholars have sought to explain why the European states which emerged in the period before the French Revolution developed along such different lines. Why did some become absolutist and others constitutionalist? What enabled some to develop bureaucratic administrative systems, while others remained dependent upon patrimonial practices? This book presents a new theory of state-building in medieval and early modern Europe. Ertman argues that two factors - the organisation of local government at the time of state formation and the timing of sustained geo-military competition - can explain most of the variation in political regimes and in state infrastructures found across the continent during the second half of the eighteenth century. Drawing on insights developed in historical sociology, comparative politics, and economic history, this book makes a compelling case for the value of interdisciplinary approaches to the study of political development.

The Cambridge Ancient History

The Cambridge Ancient History

  • Author: Alan K. Bowman,Edward Champlin
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press
  • ISBN: 9780521264303
  • Category:
  • Page: N.A
  • View: 9098
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Public Schools and Private Education

Public Schools and Private Education

The Clarendon Commission, 1861-64, and the Public Schools Acts

  • Author: Colin Shrosbree
  • Publisher: Manchester University Press
  • ISBN: 9780719025808
  • Category: Education
  • Page: 246
  • View: 3312
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Neo-Liberal Ideology

Neo-Liberal Ideology

  • Author: Rachel S Turner
  • Publisher: Edinburgh University Press
  • ISBN: 0748688684
  • Category: Political Science
  • Page: 256
  • View: 4287
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An original account of neo-liberalism's intellectual foundations, development and conceptual configuration as an ideology. Newly available in paperback.

Masculinity, Gender and Identity in the English Renaissance Lyric

Masculinity, Gender and Identity in the English Renaissance Lyric

  • Author: Catherine Bates
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press
  • ISBN: 1139468952
  • Category: Literary Criticism
  • Page: N.A
  • View: 6628
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In early modern lyric poetry, the male poet or lover often appears not as powerful and masterly but rather as broken, abject, and feminine. Catherine Bates examines the cultural and literary strategies behind this representation and uncovers radically alternative models of masculinity in the lyric tradition of the Renaissance. Focusing on Sidney, Ralegh, Shakespeare, and Donne, she offers astute readings of a wide range of texts – a sonnet sequence, a blazon, an elegy, a complaint, and an epistle. She shows how existing critical approaches have too much invested in the figure of the authoritative male writer to be able to do justice to the truly radical nature of these alternative masculinities. Taking direction from psychoanalytic theories of gender formation, Bates develops critical strategies that make it possible to understand and appreciate what is genuinely revolutionary about these texts and about the English Renaissance lyric tradition at large.

Portrait of a University, 1851-1951

Portrait of a University, 1851-1951

To Commemorate the Centenary of Manchester University

  • Author: Henry Buckley Charlton
  • Publisher: Manchester University Press
  • ISBN: N.A
  • Category: Universities and colleges
  • Page: 185
  • View: 991
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Visions of Britain, 1730-1830

Visions of Britain, 1730-1830

Anglo-Scottish Writing and Representation

  • Author: Sebastian Mitchell
  • Publisher: Springer
  • ISBN: 1137290110
  • Category: Literary Criticism
  • Page: 291
  • View: 4263
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This is a revisionist study of the literary and visual representation of the nation in the century following the formation of the British state. It argues that the most engaging accounts of Great Britain subject their imagery to sustained artistic pressure, threatening to dismantle the national vision at the moment of its construction.

Images of Englishmen and Foreigners in the Drama of Shakespeare and His Contemporaries

Images of Englishmen and Foreigners in the Drama of Shakespeare and His Contemporaries

A Study of Stage Characters and National Identity in English Renaissance Drama, 1558-1642

  • Author: A. J. Hoenselaars
  • Publisher: Fairleigh Dickinson Univ Press
  • ISBN: 9780838634318
  • Category: Drama
  • Page: 347
  • View: 9221
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The emergent national awareness in Europe during the early modern period revealed itself as patriotism and xenophobia during the age of Elizabeth. These sentiments were mainly induced by England's stance in the politico-religious debate that divided Europe, and by the arrival of refugees from abroad who placed a burden on the national economy. The popular feeling led to a multifaceted crystallization of matters native and foreign on the London stage. One manifestation of the new preoccupation was the presentation of stage characters with distinct nationalities. Drawing on stock traits, the dramatists initially created a stage world in which the Englishman was almost invariably superior to the foreigner, both in the native environment and in a continental setting. The glorification of the nation's self-image at the expense of others, however, was not to persist. English society largely absorbed the original shock induced by the influx of foreigners, and toward the end of the 1590s xenophobia lost its strident tone. Patriotism, too, was modified. The year 1588 became a historical date as James I's peace policy grew into the most popular news topic of his reign. These sociopolitical changes challenged the original images of Englishmen and foreigners in the drama. Under a climate with England ignominiously vacating the European political stage, it was difficult to uphold the once unquestioned self-image of the warlike nation. One group of dramatists, therefore, came to present the image as a forsaken ideal that could only be realized if the nation resumed its international duties. Other dramatists presented it as a past ideal and accepted it as an object for nostalgic self-gratification. The favorable self-image also became a target for the satirists. They attacked the old definition of the English and assigned to their own countrymen those properties which had previously been attributed to the foreigner. The caustic speculation on national character traits in Stuart drama was not only induced by the playwrights' discontent with the anachronistic and complimentary Elizabethan self-image. It also represented a budding skepticism with regard to the generalizing tendency involved in the definitions of national character. Inevitably, the image of the foreigner in the drama profited from the redefinition of the Englishman's auto-stereotyped image. As the satire which had previously been aimed at the foreigner came to be largely directed against the Englishman, a degree of rapprochement was established. There was a new exchange, as Richard Brome formulated it in the subtitle to his New Academy. Until the closing of the theaters in 1642, the satirical redefinition of the English national character persisted alongside the nostalgic confirmation of the favorable Elizabethan self-image. These divergent views expressed on the London stage bring into focus a national identity crisis. It parallels the growing contemporary conviction that the nation had traded in its decisive role on the European political scene for that of a passive onlooker.

The Ideal and the Real

The Ideal and the Real

An Outline of Kant’s Theory of Space, Time and Mathematical Construction

  • Author: A. Winterbourne
  • Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
  • ISBN: 9400914156
  • Category: Philosophy
  • Page: 139
  • View: 2801
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Many students coming to grips with Kant's philosophy are understandably daunted not only by the complexity and sheer difficulty of the man's writings, but almost equally by the amount of secondary literature available. A great deal of this seems to be - and not only on first reading - just about as difficult as the work it is meant to make more accessible. Any writer deliberately setting out to provide an authentically introductory text thus faces a double problem: how to provide an exegesis which would capture some of the spirit of the original, without gross and misleading over-simplification; and secondly, how to anchor the argument in the best and most imaginative secondary literature, yet avoid the whole project appearing so fragmented as to make the average book of chess openings seem positively austere. Until fairly recently, matters were made even more difficul t, in that commentaries on Kant were very often of a whole work, say, The Critique of Pure Reason, with the result that students would have to struggle through a very great deal of material indeed in order to feel any confidence at all that they had begun to understand the original writings. Recently, things have changed somewhat. There are now excellent commentaries on "Kant's Analytic", "Kant's Analogies" etc. . We have also seen, (at least as reflected in book titles), a resurgence of interest in what is perhaps the most controversial and far-reaching Kantian claim, viz.

Edinburgh History of the Book in Scotland, Volume 2

Edinburgh History of the Book in Scotland, Volume 2

Enlightenment and Expansion 1707-1800

  • Author: Stephen W Brown
  • Publisher: Edinburgh University Press
  • ISBN: 0748650954
  • Category: Literary Criticism
  • Page: 688
  • View: 1540
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The first thorough study of the book trade during the age of Fergusson and Burns.

Political Trials in Britain

Political Trials in Britain

  • Author: Peter Hain
  • Publisher: Lane, Allen
  • ISBN: N.A
  • Category: Political crimes and offenses
  • Page: 318
  • View: 4926
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