Search Results for "american-prometheus-the-triumph-and-tragedy-of-j-robert-oppenheimer"

American Prometheus

American Prometheus

The Triumph and Tragedy of J. Robert Oppenheimer

  • Author: Kai Bird,Martin J. Sherwin
  • Publisher: Vintage
  • ISBN: 0307424731
  • Category: Biography & Autobiography
  • Page: 784
  • View: 7996
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J. Robert Oppenheimer is one of the iconic figures of the twentieth century, a brilliant physicist who led the effort to build the atomic bomb for his country in a time of war, and who later found himself confronting the moral consequences of scientific progress. In this magisterial, acclaimed biography twenty-five years in the making, Kai Bird and Martin Sherwin capture Oppenheimer’s life and times, from his early career to his central role in the Cold War. This is biography and history at its finest, riveting and deeply informative. From the Trade Paperback edition.

American Prometheus

American Prometheus

The Triumph And Tragedy of J. Robert Oppenheimer

  • Author: Kai Bird,Martin J. Sherwin
  • Publisher: Vintage
  • ISBN: 0375726268
  • Category: Biography & Autobiography
  • Page: 721
  • View: 627
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A portrait of scientist J. Robert Oppenheimer, the father of the atomic bomb, discusses his role in the twentieth-century scientific world, as well as his roles as family man and head of Princeton's Institute for Advanced Studies.

American Prometheus

American Prometheus

The Triumph And Tragedy Of J. Robert Oppenheimer

  • Author: Kai Bird,Martin J. Sherwin
  • Publisher: Alfred a Knopf Incorporated
  • ISBN: 0375412026
  • Category: Biography & Autobiography
  • Page: 721
  • View: 7932
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A portrait of scientist J. Robert Oppenheimer, the father of the atomic bomb, discusses his role in the twentieth-century scientific world, as well as his roles as family man and head of Princeton's Institute for Advanced Studies.

109 East Palace

109 East Palace

Robert Oppenheimer and the Secret City of Los Alamos

  • Author: Jennet Conant
  • Publisher: Simon and Schuster
  • ISBN: 1416585427
  • Category: History
  • Page: 448
  • View: 2981
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From the bestselling author of Tuxedo Park, the fascinating story of the 3,000 people who lived together in near confinement for more than two intense and conflicted years under J. Robert Oppenheimer and the world's best scientists to produce the Atomic Bomb and win World War II. They were told as little as possible. Their orders were to go to Santa Fe, New Mexico, and report for work at a classified Manhattan Project site, a location so covert it was known to them only by the mysterious address: 109 East Palace. There, behind a wrought-iron gate and narrow passageway just off the touristy old plaza, they were greeted by Dorothy McKibbin, an attractive widow who was the least likely person imaginable to run a front for a clandestine defense laboratory. They stepped across her threshold into a parallel universe--the desert hideaway where Robert Oppenheimer and a team of world-famous scientists raced to build the first atomic bomb before Germany and bring World War II to an end. Brilliant, handsome, extraordinarily charismatic, Oppenheimer based his unprecedented scientific enterprise in the high reaches of the Sangre de Cristo mountains, hoping that the land of enchantment would conceal and inspire their bold mission. Oppenheimer was as arrogant as he was inexperienced, and few believed the thirty-eight-year-old theoretical physicist would succeed. Jennet Conant captures all the exhilaration and drama of those perilous twenty-seven months at Los Alamos, a secret city cut off from the rest of society, ringed by barbed wire, where Oppenheimer and his young recruits lived as virtual prisoners of the U.S. government. With her dry humor and eye for detail, Conant chronicles the chaotic beginnings of Oppenheimer's by-the-seat-of-his-pants operation, where freshly minted secretaries and worldly scientists had to contend with living conditions straight out of pioneer days. Despite all the obstacles, Oppie managed to forge a vibrant community at Los Alamos through the sheer force of his personality. Dorothy, who fell for him at first sight, devoted herself to taking care of him and his crew and supported him through the terrifying preparations for the test explosion at Trinity and the harrowing aftermath of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Less than a decade later, Oppenheimer became the focus of suspicion during the McCarthy witch hunts. When he and James B. Conant, one of the top administrators of the Manhattan Project (and the author's grandfather), led the campaign against the hydrogen bomb, Oppenheimer's past left-wing sympathies were used against him, and he was found to be a security risk and stripped of his clearance. Though Dorothy tried to help clear his name, she saw the man she loved disgraced. In this riveting and deeply moving account, drawing on a wealth of research and interviews with close family and colleagues, Jennet Conant reveals an exceptionally gifted and enigmatic man who served his country at tremendous personal cost and whose singular achievement, and subsequent undoing, is at the root of our present nuclear predicament.

J. Robert Oppenheimer and the American Century

J. Robert Oppenheimer and the American Century

  • Author: David C. Cassidy
  • Publisher: Johns Hopkins University Press
  • ISBN: 9780801893179
  • Category: Biography & Autobiography
  • Page: 496
  • View: 5204
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In rich detail Cassidy places this personal story of public disgrace within the larger narrative of the rise of science in America.

Robert Oppenheimer

Robert Oppenheimer

A Life Inside the Center

  • Author: Ray Monk
  • Publisher: Anchor
  • ISBN: 0385722044
  • Category: Biography & Autobiography
  • Page: 825
  • View: 5583
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Explores the complex intellectual life of the innovator of the atomic bomb, providing coverage of such topics as his sympathy toward Communism, his lead over the Manhattan Project, and his Jewish faith.

A Life in Twilight

A Life in Twilight

The Final Years of J. Robert Oppenheimer

  • Author: Mark Wolverton
  • Publisher: St. Martin's Press
  • ISBN: 9781429953283
  • Category: Biography & Autobiography
  • Page: 352
  • View: 1726
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A Life in Twilight reveals the least-known and most enigmatic period of J. Robert Oppenheimer's life, from the public humiliation he endured after the 1954 Atomic Energy Commission's investigation into his alleged communist leanings and connections to his death in 1967. It covers Oppenheimer's continued work as a scientist and philosopher and head of the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, his often controversial public appearances, as well as parts of his private life. What emerges is a portrait of a man who was toppled from the highest echelons of politics and society, had to see his honor and name blackened, but succeeded in maintaining his dignity and rebuilding a shattered life, although he never truly recovered from the McCarthy-inspired persecution he suffered. Previously unpublished FBI files round out the picture and cast a sinister cloud over Oppenheimer's final years, during which he remained under occasional surveillance. Mark Wolverton has succeeded in presenting an evenhanded and very well- researched account of a life that ended in twilight. It reads like a written version of the acclaimed film Good Night, and Good Luck, and indeed Murrow's interview with Oppenheimer is one of the central elements of the story. A Life in Twilight is an important exploration, not only of a prominent scientist and philosopher, but also of an unforgettable era in American history.

J. Robert Oppenheimer, The Cold War, and The Atomic West

J. Robert Oppenheimer, The Cold War, and The Atomic West

  • Author: Jon Hunner
  • Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press
  • ISBN: 0806185775
  • Category: Biography & Autobiography
  • Page: 272
  • View: 5828
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In 1922, the teenage son of a Jewish immigrant ventured from Manhattan to New Mexico for his health. It was the first of many trips to the Sangre de Cristo Mountains, a western retreat where J. Robert Oppenheimer would eventually hold pathbreaking discussions with world-renowned scientists about atomic physics. Oppenheimer came to feel at home in the American West, and while extensive studies have been made of the man, this is the first book to explicitly link him with the region. J. Robert Oppenheimer, the Cold War, and the Atomic West explores how the West influenced Oppenheimer as a scientist and as a person—and the role he played in influencing it. Jon Hunner’s concise account of Oppenheimer’s life and the emergence of an Atomic West distills a vast literature for students and general readers. In this brisk, engaging biography, the author recounts how Oppenheimer helped locate the atomic weapons research lab at Los Alamos, New Mexico, and helped establish leading physics departments at the University of California–Berkeley and Caltech. By taking part in moving atomic physics west of the Mississippi, Oppenheimer bolstered the establishment of research labs, uranium mines, nuclear reactors, and more, bringing talented people—and billions of dollars in federal contracts—to the region. Interwoven into this atomic tale are insights into the physicist’s troubled growing-up years, his marriage and family life, the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, and Oppenheimer’s eventual downfall. After the first atomic bomb burst over the New Mexican desert in 1945 and as the Cold War developed, the American myth of the Wild West expanded to encompass atomic sheriffs saving the world for democracy—even as powerful opponents began questioning Oppenheimer’s place in that story. Against the backdrop of the physicist’s life twining with the region’s history, Hunner explores the promise and peril of the Atomic Age.

The Meanings of J. Robert Oppenheimer

The Meanings of J. Robert Oppenheimer

  • Author: Lindsey Michael Banco
  • Publisher: University of Iowa Press
  • ISBN: 1609384199
  • Category: Biography & Autobiography
  • Page: 268
  • View: 6135
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Desert saint or destroyer of worlds: Oppenheimer biographies -- Under the sun: Oppenheimer in history -- History imagined: Oppenheimer in fiction -- The ghost and the machine: Oppenheimer in film and television -- "The bony truth": Oppenheimer in museums -- In his own worlds: Oppenheimer's writing

The Ruin of J. Robert Oppenheimer

The Ruin of J. Robert Oppenheimer

And the Birth of the Modern Arms Race

  • Author: Priscilla J. McMillan
  • Publisher: JHU Press
  • ISBN: 142142567X
  • Category: History
  • Page: 416
  • View: 6054
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On April 12, 1954, the nation was astonished to learn that J. Robert Oppenheimer was facing charges of violating national security. Could the director of the Manhattan Project, the visionary who led the effort to build the atom bomb, really be a traitor? In this riveting book, bestselling author Priscilla J. McMillan draws on newly declassified U.S. government documents and materials from Russia, as well as in-depth interviews, to expose for the first time the conspiracy that destroyed one of America’s most illustrious scientists. McMillan recreates the fraught years from 1949 to 1955 when Oppenheimer and a group of liberal scientists tried to head off the cabal of hard-line air force officials, anti-Communist politicians, and rival scientists, including physicist Edward Teller, who were trying to seize control of U.S. policy and build ever more deadly nuclear weapons. Retelling the story of Oppenheimer’s trial, which took place in utmost secrecy, she describes how the government made up its own rules and violated many protections of the rule of law. She also argues that the effort to discredit Oppenheimer, occurring at the height of the McCarthy era and sanctioned by a misinformed President Eisenhower, was a watershed in the Cold War, poisoning American politics for decades and creating dangers that haunt us today. A chilling tale of McCarthy-era machinations, this groundbreaking page-turner rewrites the history of the Cold War.

The General and the Genius

The General and the Genius

Groves and Oppenheimer ? The Unlikely Partnership that Built the Atom Bomb

  • Author: James Kunetka
  • Publisher: Simon and Schuster
  • ISBN: 1621573850
  • Category: Biography & Autobiography
  • Page: 480
  • View: 7400
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With a blinding flash in the New Mexico desert in the summer of 1945, the world was changed forever. The bomb that ushered in the atomic age was the product of one of history's most improbable partnerships. The General and the Genius reveals how two extraordinary men pulled off the greatest scientific feat of the twentieth century. Leslie Richard Groves of the Army Corps of Engineers, who had made his name by building the Pentagon in record time and under budget, was made overlord of the impossibly vast scientific enterprise known as the Manhattan Project. His mission: to beat the Nazis to the atomic bomb. So he turned to the nation's preeminent theoretical physicist, J. Robert Oppenheimer—the chain-smoking, martini-quaffing son of wealthy Jewish immigrants, whose background was riddled with communist associations—Groves's opposite in nearly every respect. In their three-year collaboration, the iron-willed general and the visionary scientist led a brilliant team in a secret mountaintop lab and built the fearsome weapons that ended the war but introduced the human race to unimaginable new terrors. And at the heart of this most momentous work of World War II is the story of two extraordinary men—the general and the genius.

Uncommon Sense

Uncommon Sense

  • Author: J. Robert Oppenheimer
  • Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
  • ISBN: 1468467352
  • Category: Philosophy
  • Page: 196
  • View: 8284
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J. Robert Oppenheimer, a leading physicist in the Manhattan Project, recognized that scientific inquiry and discovery could no longer be separated from their effect on political decision-making, social responsibility, and human endeavor in general. He openly addressed issues of common concern and as a scientist accepted the responsibility brought about by nuclear physics and the atom bomb. In this collection of essays and speeches, Oppenheimer discusses the shift in scientific awareness and its impact on education, the question of openness in a society forced to keep secrets, the conflict between individual concerns and public and political necessity, the future of science and its effects on future politics---in short, the common and uncommon sense we find in our modern day reality.

The Color of Truth

The Color of Truth

McGeorge Bundy and William Bundy: Brothers in Arms

  • Author: Kai Bird
  • Publisher: Simon and Schuster
  • ISBN: 1501169165
  • Category: History
  • Page: 496
  • View: 4096
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"Grey is the color of truth." So observed Mac Bundy in defending America's intervention in Vietnam. Kai Bird brilliantly captures this ambiguity in his revelatory look at Bundy and his brother William, two of the most influential policymakers of the Kennedy and Johnson administrations. It is a portrait of fiercely patriotic, brilliant and brazenly self-confident men who directed a steady escalation of a war they did not believe could be won. Bird draws on seven years of research, nearly one hundred interviews, and scores of still-classified top secret documents in a masterful reevaluation of America's actions throughout the Cold War and Vietnam.

J. Robert Oppenheimer

J. Robert Oppenheimer

A Life

  • Author: Abraham Pais,Robert P. Crease
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press
  • ISBN: 0195327128
  • Category: Biography & Autobiography
  • Page: 353
  • View: 383
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An illuminating portrait of J. Robert Oppenheimer chronicles the story of one of the most charismatic and enigmatic figures of modern physics, from his precocious youth to his seminal role in developing the first atomic bomb, and beyond.

Robert Oppenheimer, Letters and Recollections

Robert Oppenheimer, Letters and Recollections

  • Author: J. Robert Oppenheimer,Alice Kimball Smith,Charles Weiner
  • Publisher: LIT Verlag Münster
  • ISBN: 9780804726207
  • Category: Biography & Autobiography
  • Page: 376
  • View: 3452
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Robert Oppenheimer (1904-1967) is one of the few American scientists who have become public and controversial figures in the twentieth century. This book adds a new dimension to the Oppenheimer story by offering a look at the private man behind the public figure. It consists of letters spanning the period from his Harvard student days in 1922 to his departure from Los Alamos in 1945. The letters are supplemented by recollections of those who knew Oppenheimer and by his own recollections from an interview a few years before his death. 'A beautifully organized collection of letters and reminiscences ... The editors have interviewed those who knew and worked with him, stirred in the necessary explanatory background, and produced an account, both scholarly and highly readable, which throws fresh light on a man who will probably always remain something of an enigma. Amid devotional defense and almost rabid attack, their book is a model of objectivity.' New York Times Book RevieW 'An intimate, carefully documented, and honest book.'

The Making of the Atomic Bomb

The Making of the Atomic Bomb

  • Author: Richard Rhodes
  • Publisher: Simon and Schuster
  • ISBN: 9781439126226
  • Category: History
  • Page: 928
  • View: 6826
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Twenty-five years after its initial publication, The Making of the Atomic Bomb remains the definitive history of nuclear weapons and the Manhattan Project. From the turn-of-the-century discovery of nuclear energy to the dropping of the first bombs on Japan, Richard Rhodes’s Pulitzer Prize-winning book details the science, the people, and the socio-political realities that led to the development of the atomic bomb. This sweeping account begins in the 19th century, with the discovery of nuclear fission, and continues to World War Two and the Americans’ race to beat Hitler’s Nazis. That competition launched the Manhattan Project and the nearly overnight construction of a vast military-industrial complex that culminated in the fateful dropping of the first bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Reading like a character-driven suspense novel, the book introduces the players in this saga of physics, politics, and human psychology—from FDR and Einstein to the visionary scientists who pioneered quantum theory and the application of thermonuclear fission, including Planck, Szilard, Bohr, Oppenheimer, Fermi, Teller, Meitner, von Neumann, and Lawrence. From nuclear power’s earliest foreshadowing in the work of H.G. Wells to the bright glare of Trinity at Alamogordo and the arms race of the Cold War, this dread invention forever changed the course of human history, and The Making of The Atomic Bomb provides a panoramic backdrop for that story. Richard Rhodes’s ability to craft compelling biographical portraits is matched only by his rigorous scholarship. Told in rich human, political, and scientific detail that any reader can follow, The Making of the Atomic Bomb is a thought-provoking and masterful work.

An Atomic Love Story

An Atomic Love Story

The Extraordinary Women in Robert Oppenheimer's Life

  • Author: Shirley Streshinsky,Patricia Klaus
  • Publisher: Turner
  • ISBN: 9781618580191
  • Category: BIOGRAPHY & AUTOBIOGRAPHY
  • Page: 400
  • View: 1687
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A gripping narrative of the love and betrayal of J. Robert Oppenheimer, told through the lives of three unique women. Set against a dramatic backdrop of war, spies, and nuclear bombs, An Atomic Love Story unveils a vivid new view of a tumultuous era and one of its most important figures. In the early decades of the 20th century, three highly ambitious women found their way to the West Coast, where each was destined to collide with the young Oppenheimer, the enigmatic physicist whose work in creating the atomic bomb would forever impact modern history. His first and most intense love was for Jean Tatlock, though he married the tempestuous Kitty Harrison—both were members of the Communist Party—and was rumored to have had a scandalous affair with the brilliant Ruth Sherman Tolman, ten years his senior and the wife of another celebrated physicist. Although each were connected through their relationship to Oppenheimer, their experiences reflect important changes in the lives of American women in the 20th century: the conflict between career and marriage; the need for a woman to define herself independently; experimentation with sexuality; and the growth of career opportunities. Beautifully written and superbly researched through a rich collection of firsthand accounts, this intimate portrait shares the tragedies, betrayals, and romances of an alluring man and three bold women, revealing how they pushed to the very forefront of social and cultural changes in a fascinating, volatile era.

The Good Spy

The Good Spy

The Life and Death of Robert Ames

  • Author: Kai Bird
  • Publisher: Crown
  • ISBN: 0307889777
  • Category: Political Science
  • Page: 448
  • View: 6592
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The Good Spy is Pulitzer Prize-winning biographer Kai Bird’s compelling portrait of the remarkable life and death of one of the most important operatives in CIA history – a man who, had he lived, might have helped heal the rift between Arabs and the West. On April 18, 1983, a bomb exploded outside the American Embassy in Beirut, killing 63 people. The attack was a geopolitical turning point. It marked the beginning of Hezbollah as a political force, but even more important, it eliminated America’s most influential and effective intelligence officer in the Middle East – CIA operative Robert Ames. What set Ames apart from his peers was his extraordinary ability to form deep, meaningful connections with key Arab intelligence figures. Some operatives relied on threats and subterfuge, but Ames worked by building friendships and emphasizing shared values – never more notably than with Yasir Arafat’s charismatic intelligence chief and heir apparent Ali Hassan Salameh (aka “The Red Prince”). Ames’ deepening relationship with Salameh held the potential for a lasting peace. Within a few years, though, both men were killed by assassins, and America’s relations with the Arab world began heading down a path that culminated in 9/11, the War on Terror, and the current fog of mistrust. Bird, who as a child lived in the Beirut Embassy and knew Ames as a neighbor when he was twelve years old, spent years researching The Good Spy. Not only does the book draw on hours of interviews with Ames’ widow, and quotes from hundreds of Ames’ private letters, it’s woven from interviews with scores of current and former American, Israeli, and Palestinian intelligence officers as well as other players in the Middle East “Great Game.” What emerges is a masterpiece-level narrative of the making of a CIA officer, a uniquely insightful history of twentieth-century conflict in the Middle East, and an absorbing hour-by-hour account of the Beirut Embassy bombing. Even more impressive, Bird draws on his reporter’s skills to deliver a full dossier on the bombers and expose the shocking truth of where the attack’s mastermind resides today.

The Chairman: John J McCloy & The Making of the American Establishment

The Chairman: John J McCloy & The Making of the American Establishment

  • Author: Kai Bird
  • Publisher: Simon and Schuster
  • ISBN: 1501169173
  • Category: Biography & Autobiography
  • Page: 800
  • View: 7392
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“Exhaustively researched and remarkably evenhanded.” —The New York Times “Absorbing…the definitive life story.” —Kirkus Reviews “A fascinating study.” —Los Angeles Times In The Chairman, the authoritative biography of John J. McCloy, Pulitzer Prize-winning author Kai Bird chronicles the life of the man labeled “the most influential private citizen in America.” Against the backgrounds of World War II, the Cold War, the construction of Pax Americana, the Cuban missile crisis, the Kennedy assassination, and Vietnam, Bird shows us McCloy’s astonishing rise from self-described “chore boy” to “chairman of the Establishment.” His powerful circle shaped the postwar globe. But McCloy stood out among them as a towering figure of achievement: as a Wall Street lawyer who earned the confidence of captains of industry and presidents; as Henry Stimson’s right-hand man at the War Department; as president of the World Bank and chairman of the Chase financial empire; and as presidential adviser. Bird captures every facet of this self-made man. We see McCloy’s commercial acumen as the most in-demand lawyer of Wall Street; his dictatorial will as high commissioner of occupied Germany; and his stoic loyalty as adviser to Presidents FDR, Truman, Eisenhower, Kennedy, Johnson, Carter, Ford, and Reagan. Bird brilliantly explores how McCloy came to epitomize the American Establishment and the values of a generation that led the United States through bitter war and unparalleled prosperity.