Search Results for "black-faces-white-spaces-reimagining-the-relationship-of-african-americans-to-the-great-outdoors"

Black Faces, White Spaces

Black Faces, White Spaces

Reimagining the Relationship of African Americans to the Great Outdoors

  • Author: Carolyn Finney
  • Publisher: UNC Press Books
  • ISBN: 1469614480
  • Category: Nature
  • Page: 194
  • View: 3309
DOWNLOAD NOW »
Black Faces, White Spaces: Reimagining the Relationship of African Americans to the Great Outdoors

Black Faces, White Spaces

Black Faces, White Spaces

Reimagining the Relationship of African Americans to the Great Outdoors

  • Author: Carolyn Finney
  • Publisher: UNC Press Books
  • ISBN: 1469614499
  • Category: Nature
  • Page: 194
  • View: 9137
DOWNLOAD NOW »
Why are African Americans so underrepresented when it comes to interest in nature, outdoor recreation, and environmentalism? In this thought-provoking study, Carolyn Finney looks beyond the discourse of the environmental justice movement to examine how the natural environment has been understood, commodified, and represented by both white and black Americans. Bridging the fields of environmental history, cultural studies, critical race studies, and geography, Finney argues that the legacies of slavery, Jim Crow, and racial violence have shaped cultural understandings of the "great outdoors" and determined who should and can have access to natural spaces. Drawing on a variety of sources from film, literature, and popular culture, and analyzing different historical moments, including the establishment of the Wilderness Act in 1964 and the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, Finney reveals the perceived and real ways in which nature and the environment are racialized in America. Looking toward the future, she also highlights the work of African Americans who are opening doors to greater participation in environmental and conservation concerns.

Black Faces in White Places

Black Faces in White Places

10 Game-changing Strategies to Achieve Success and Find Greatness

  • Author: Randal Pinkett,Jeffrey Robinson,Philana Patterson
  • Publisher: AMACOM Div American Mgmt Assn
  • ISBN: 0814416802
  • Category: Business & Economics
  • Page: 266
  • View: 1879
DOWNLOAD NOW »
The first African-American winner of The Apprentice explains how black professionals can bust through racial barriers in order to climb the corporate ladder and reach their full potential.

Race and Nature from Transcendentalism to the Harlem Renaissance

Race and Nature from Transcendentalism to the Harlem Renaissance

  • Author: P. Outka
  • Publisher: Springer
  • ISBN: 0230614493
  • Category: Literary Criticism
  • Page: 266
  • View: 4014
DOWNLOAD NOW »
Drawing on theories of sublimity, trauma, and ecocriticism, this book examines how the often sharp division between European American and African American experiences of the natural world developed in American culture and history, and how those natural experiences, in turn, shaped the construction of race.

Rooted in the Earth

Rooted in the Earth

Reclaiming the African American Environmental Heritage

  • Author: Dianne D. Glave
  • Publisher: Chicago Review Press
  • ISBN: 156976753X
  • Category: History
  • Page: 208
  • View: 6884
DOWNLOAD NOW »
With a basis in environmental history, this groundbreaking study challenges the idea that a meaningful attachment to nature and the outdoors is contrary to the black experience. The discussion shows that contemporary African American culture is usually seen as an urban culture, one that arose out of the Great Migration and has contributed to international trends in fashion, music, and the arts ever since. But because of this urban focus, many African Americans are not at peace with their rich but tangled agrarian legacy. On one hand, the book shows, nature and violence are connected in black memory, especially in disturbing images such as slave ships on the ocean, exhaustion in the fields, dogs in the woods, and dead bodies hanging from trees. In contrast, though, there is also a competing tradition of African American stewardship of the land that should be better known. Emphasizing the tradition of black environmentalism and using storytelling techniques to dramatize the work of black naturalists, this account corrects the record and urges interested urban dwellers to get back to the land.

To Love the Wind and the Rain

To Love the Wind and the Rain

African Americans and Environmental History

  • Author: Dianne D. Glave,Mark Stoll
  • Publisher: University of Pittsburgh Pre
  • ISBN: 0822972905
  • Category: Social Science
  • Page: 288
  • View: 6802
DOWNLOAD NOW »
An analysis of the relationship between African Americans and the environment focuses on three major themes: African Americans in the rural environment, African Americans in the urban and suburban environments, and African Americans and the notion of environmental justice.

Black Nature

Black Nature

Four Centuries of African American Nature Poetry

  • Author: Camille T. Dungy
  • Publisher: University of Georgia Press
  • ISBN: 0820332771
  • Category: Poetry
  • Page: 387
  • View: 3382
DOWNLOAD NOW »
Black Nature is the first anthology to focus on nature writing by African American poets, a genre that until now has not commonly been counted as one in which African American poets have participated. Black poets have a long tradition of incorporating treatments of the natural world into their work, but it is often read as political, historical, or protest poetry--anything but nature poetry. This is particularly true when the definition of what constitutes nature writing is limited to work about the pastoral or the wild. Camille T. Dungy has selected 180 poems from 93 poets that provide unique perspectives on American social and literary history to broaden our concept of nature poetry and African American poetics. This collection features major writers such as Phillis Wheatley, Rita Dove, Yusef Komunyakaa, Gwendolyn Brooks, Sterling Brown, Robert Hayden, Wanda Coleman, Natasha Trethewey, and Melvin B. Tolson as well as newer talents such as Douglas Kearney, Major Jackson, and Janice Harrington. Included are poets writing out of slavery, Reconstruction, the Harlem Renaissance, the Black Arts Movement, and late twentieth- and early twenty-first-century African American poetic movements. Black Nature brings to the fore a neglected and vital means of considering poetry by African Americans and nature-related poetry as a whole. A Friends Fund Publication.

The Adventure Gap

The Adventure Gap

Changing the Face of the Outdoors

  • Author: James Edward Mills
  • Publisher: Mountaineers Books
  • ISBN: 1594858691
  • Category: Sports & Recreation
  • Page: 256
  • View: 9330
DOWNLOAD NOW »
• Chronicles the first all-African American summit attempt on Denali, the highest point in North America • Part adventure story, part history, and part argument for the importance of inspiring future generations to value nature The nation’s wild places—from national and state parks to national forests, preserves, and wilderness areas—belong to all Americans. But not all of us use these resources equally. Minority populations are much less likely to seek recreation, adventure, and solace in our wilderness spaces. It’s a difference that African American author James Mills addresses in his new book, The Adventure Gap: Changing the Face of the Outdoors. Bridging the so-called “adventure gap” requires role models who can inspire the uninitiated to experience and enjoy wild places. Once new visitors are there, a love affair often follows. This is important because as our country grows increasingly multicultural, our natural legacy will need the devotion of people of all races and ethnicities to steward its care. In 2013, the first all-African American team of climbers, sponsored by the National Outdoor Leadership School (NOLS), challenged themselves on North America’s highest point, the dangerous and forbidding Denali, in Alaska. Mills uses Expedition Denali and its team members’ adventures as a jumping-off point to explore how minority populations view their place in wild environments and to share the stories of those who have already achieved significant accomplishments in outdoor adventures—from Mathew Henson, a Black explorer who stood with Peary at the North Pole, to Kai Lightner, a teenage sport climber currently winning national competitions. The goal of the expedition, and now the book, is to inspire minority communities to look outdoors for experiences that will enrich their lives, and to encourage them toward greater environmental stewardship.

The Colors of Nature

The Colors of Nature

Culture, Identity, and the Natural World

  • Author: Alison Hawthorne Deming,Lauret E. Savoy
  • Publisher: Milkweed Editions
  • ISBN: 1571318143
  • Category: Nature
  • Page: 368
  • View: 2647
DOWNLOAD NOW »
From African American to Asian American, indigenous to immigrant, "multiracial" to "mixedblood," the diversity of cultures in this world is matched only by the diversity of stories explaining our cultural origins: stories of creation and destruction, displacement and heartbreak, hope and mystery. With writing from Jamaica Kincaid on the fallacies of national myths, Yusef Komunyakaa connecting the toxic legacy of his hometown, Bogalusa, LA, to a blind faith in capitalism, and bell hooks relating the quashing of multiculturalism to the destruction of nature that is considered "unpredictable" — amongst more than 35 other examinations of the relationship between culture and nature — this collection points toward the trouble of ignoring our cultural heritage, but also reveals how opening our eyes and our minds might provide a more livable future. Contributors: Elmaz Abinader, Faith Adiele, Francisco X. Alarcón, Fred Arroyo, Kimberly Blaeser, Joseph Bruchac, Robert D. Bullard, Debra Kang Dean, Camille Dungy, Nikky Finney, Ray Gonzalez, Kimiko Hahn, bell hooks, Jeanne Wakatsuki Houston, Pualani Kanaka‘ole Kanahele, Robin Wall Kimmerer, Jamaica Kincaid, Yusef Komunyakaa, J. Drew Lanham, David Mas Masumoto, Maria Melendez, Thyllias Moss, Gary Paul Nabhan, Nalini Nadkarni, Melissa Nelson, Jennifer Oladipo, Louis Owens, Enrique Salmon, Aileen Suzara, A. J. Verdelle, Gerald Vizenor, Patricia Jabbeh Wesley, Al Young, Ofelia Zepeda

Understories

Understories

The Political Life of Forests in Northern New Mexico

  • Author: Jake Kosek
  • Publisher: Duke University Press
  • ISBN: 9780822338475
  • Category: Nature
  • Page: 380
  • View: 4020
DOWNLOAD NOW »
A lively, engaging ethnography that demonstrates how a volatile politics of race, class, and nation animates the infamously violent struggles over forests in the U.S. Southwest.

Idlewild

Idlewild

The Black Eden of Michigan

  • Author: Ronald Jemal Stephens
  • Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
  • ISBN: 9780738518909
  • Category: History
  • Page: 128
  • View: 4605
DOWNLOAD NOW »
Once considered the most famous African-American resort community in the country, Idlewild was referred to as the Black Eden of Michigan in the 1920s and '30s, and as the Summer Apollo of Michigan in the 1950s and '60s. Showcasing classy revues and interactive performances of some of the leading black entertainers of the period, Idlewild was an oasis in the shadows of legal segregation. Idlewild: Black Eden of Michigan focuses on this illustrative history, as well as the decline and the community's contemporary renaissance, in over 200 rare photographs. The lively legacy of Lela G. and Herman O. Wilson, and Paradise Path is included, featuring images of the Paradise Club and Wilson's Grocery. Idlewild continued its role as a distinctive American resort throughout the 1950s, with photographs ranging from Phil Giles' Flamingo Club and Arthur Braggs's Idlewild Revue.

African American Environmental Thought

African American Environmental Thought

Foundations

  • Author: Kimberly K. Smith
  • Publisher: N.A
  • ISBN: N.A
  • Category: Nature
  • Page: 257
  • View: 1316
DOWNLOAD NOW »
Examines the works of Frederick Douglass, Booker T. Washington, W. E. B. Du Bois, and several other canonical figures, to uncover a rich and vital tradition of black environmental thought from the abolition movement through the Harlem Renaissance. Provides the first careful linkage of the early conservation movement to black history, the first detailed description of black agrarianism, and the first analysis of scientific racism as an environmental theory.

Black and Brown Faces in America's Wild Places

Black and Brown Faces in America's Wild Places

  • Author: Dudley Edmondson
  • Publisher: Adventure Publications(MN)
  • ISBN: 9781591931737
  • Category: Nature
  • Page: 144
  • View: 2795
DOWNLOAD NOW »
Dudley Edmondson believes it is critical for people of color to get involved in nature conservation. He sought out 20 African Americans with connections to nature. The result is a compelling look at issues important to the future of public lands.

Mourning Nature

Mourning Nature

Hope at the Heart of Ecological Loss and Grief

  • Author: Ashlee Cunsolo,Karen Landman
  • Publisher: McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP
  • ISBN: 0773549366
  • Category: Science
  • Page: N.A
  • View: 3349
DOWNLOAD NOW »
We are facing unprecedented environmental challenges, including global climate change, large-scale industrial development, rapidly increasing species extinction, ocean acidification, and deforestation – challenges that require new vocabularies and new ways to express grief and sorrow over the disappearance, degradation, and loss of nature. Seeking to redress the silence around ecologically based anxiety in academic and public domains, and to extend the concepts of sadness, anger, and loss, Mourning Nature creates a lexicon for the recognition and expression of emotions related to environmental degradation. Exploring the ways in which grief is experienced in numerous contexts, this groundbreaking collection draws on classical, philosophical, artistic, and poetic elements to explain environmental melancholia. Understanding that it is not just how we mourn but what we mourn that defines us, the authors introduce new perspectives on conservation, sustainability, and our relationships with nature. An ecological elegy for a time of climatic and environmental upheaval, Mourning Nature challenges readers to turn devastating events into an opportunity for positive change. Contributors include Glenn Albrecht (Murdoch University, retired); Jessica Marion Barr (Trent University); Sebastian Braun (University of North Dakota); Ashlee Cunsolo (Labrador Institute of Memorial University); Amanda Di Battista (York University); Franklin Ginn (University of Edinburgh); Bernie Krause (soundscape ecologist, author, and independent scholar); Lisa Kretz (University of Evansville); Karen Landman (University of Guelph); Patrick Lane (Poet); Andrew Mark (independent scholar); Nancy Menning (Ithaca College); John Charles Ryan (University of New England); Catriona Sandilands (York University); and Helen Whale (independent scholar).

The Rise of the American Conservation Movement

The Rise of the American Conservation Movement

Power, Privilege, and Environmental Protection

  • Author: Dorceta E. Taylor
  • Publisher: Duke University Press
  • ISBN: 0822373971
  • Category: Nature
  • Page: 496
  • View: 2346
DOWNLOAD NOW »
In this sweeping social history Dorceta E. Taylor examines the emergence and rise of the multifaceted U.S. conservation movement from the mid-nineteenth to the early twentieth century. She shows how race, class, and gender influenced every aspect of the movement, including the establishment of parks; campaigns to protect wild game, birds, and fish; forest conservation; outdoor recreation; and the movement's links to nineteenth-century ideologies. Initially led by white urban elites—whose early efforts discriminated against the lower class and were often tied up with slavery and the appropriation of Native lands—the movement benefited from contributions to policy making, knowledge about the environment, and activism by the poor and working class, people of color, women, and Native Americans. Far-ranging and nuanced, The Rise of the American Conservation Movement comprehensively documents the movement's competing motivations, conflicts, problematic practices, and achievements in new ways.

Clean and White

Clean and White

A History of Environmental Racism in the United States

  • Author: Carl A. Zimring
  • Publisher: NYU Press
  • ISBN: 147987437X
  • Category: History
  • Page: 288
  • View: 8703
DOWNLOAD NOW »
When Joe Biden attempted to compliment Barack Obama by calling him “clean and articulate,” he unwittingly tapped into one of the most destructive racial stereotypes in American history. This book tells the history of the corrosive idea that whites are clean and those who are not white are dirty. From the age of Thomas Jefferson to the Memphis Public Workers strike of 1968 through the present day, ideas about race and waste have shaped where people have lived, where people have worked, and how American society’s wastes have been managed. Clean and White offers a history of environmental racism in the United States focusing on constructions of race and hygiene. In the wake of the civil war, as the nation encountered emancipation, mass immigration, and the growth of an urbanized society, Americans began to conflate the ideas of race and waste. Certain immigrant groups took on waste management labor, such as Jews and scrap metal recycling, fostering connections between the socially marginalized and refuse. Ethnic “purity” was tied to pure cleanliness, and hygiene became a central aspect of white identity. Carl A. Zimring here draws on historical evidence from statesmen, scholars, sanitarians, novelists, activists, advertisements, and the United States Census of Population to reveal changing constructions of environmental racism. The material consequences of these attitudes endured and expanded through the twentieth century, shaping waste management systems and environmental inequalities that endure into the twenty-first century. Today, the bigoted idea that non-whites are “dirty” remains deeply ingrained in the national psyche, continuing to shape social and environmental inequalities in the age of Obama.

The Home Place

The Home Place

Memoirs of a Colored Man's Love Affair with Nature

  • Author: J. Drew Lanham
  • Publisher: Milkweed Editions
  • ISBN: 1571318755
  • Category: Biography & Autobiography
  • Page: 232
  • View: 8755
DOWNLOAD NOW »
“In me, there is the red of miry clay, the brown of spring floods, the gold of ripening tobacco. All of these hues are me; I am, in the deepest sense, colored.” From these fertile soils of love, land, identity, family, and race emerges The Home Place, a big-hearted, unforgettable memoir by ornithologist and professor of ecology J. Drew Lanham. Dating back to slavery, Edgefield County, South Carolina—a place “easy to pass by on the way somewhere else”—has been home to generations of Lanhams. In The Home Place, readers meet these extraordinary people, including Drew himself, who over the course of the 1970s falls in love with the natural world around him. As his passion takes flight, however, he begins to ask what it means to be “the rare bird, the oddity.” By turns angry, funny, elegiac, and heartbreaking, The Home Place is a remarkable meditation on nature and belonging, at once a deeply moving memoir and riveting exploration of the contradictions of black identity in the rural South—and in America today.

Landscapes of Exclusion

Landscapes of Exclusion

State Parks and Jim Crow in the American South

  • Author: William E. O'Brien
  • Publisher: N.A
  • ISBN: 9781625341556
  • Category: Social Science
  • Page: 280
  • View: 9025
DOWNLOAD NOW »
From early in the twentieth century, the state park movement sought to expand public access to scenic American places. During the 1930s those efforts accelerated as the National Park Service used New Deal funding and labor to construct parks nationwide. However, under severe Jim Crow restrictions in the South, African Americans were routinely and officially denied entrance to these sites. In response, advocacy groups pressured the National Park Service to provide some facilities for African Americans. William E. O'Brien shows that these parks were typically substandard in relation to "white only" areas. In the postwar years, as the NAACP filed federal lawsuits that demanded park desegregation and increased pressure on park officials, southern park agencies reacted with attempts to expand segregated facilities, hoping they could demonstrate that these parks achieved the "separate but equal" standard. But the courts consistently ruled in favor of integration, leading to the end of segregated state parks by the middle of the 1960s. Even though the stories behind these largely inferior facilities faded from public awareness, the imprint of segregated state park design remains visible throughout the South. O'Brien illuminates this untold facet of Jim Crow history in the first-ever study of segregation in southern state parks. His new book underscores the profound inequality that persisted for decades in the number, size, and quality of state parks provided for African American visitors in the Jim Crow South.

The National Park to Come

The National Park to Come

  • Author: Margret Grebowicz
  • Publisher: Stanford University Press
  • ISBN: 0804793425
  • Category: Philosophy
  • Page: 104
  • View: 5460
DOWNLOAD NOW »
Historians of wilderness have shown that nature reserves are used ideologically in the construction of American national identity. But the contemporary problem of wilderness demands examination of how profoundly nature-in-reserve influences something more fundamental, namely what counts as being well, having a life, and having a future. What is wellness for the citizens to whom the parks are said to democratically belong? And how does the presence of foreigners threaten this wellness? Recent critiques of the Wilderness Act focus exclusively on its ecological effects, ignoring the extent to which wilderness policy affects our contemporary collective experience and political imagination. Tracing the challenges that migration and indigenousness currently pose to the national park system and the Wilderness Act, Grebowicz foregrounds concerns with social justice against the ecological and aesthetic ones that have created and continue to shape these environments. With photographs by Jacqueline Schlossman.

The Oak Ridges Moraine Battles

The Oak Ridges Moraine Battles

Development, Sprawl, and Nature Conservation in the Toronto Region

  • Author: L. Anders Sandberg,Gerda R. Wekerle,Liette Gilbert
  • Publisher: University of Toronto Press
  • ISBN: 1442666536
  • Category: Political Science
  • Page: 336
  • View: 8056
DOWNLOAD NOW »
The Oak Ridges Moraine is a unique landform that generated heated battles over the future of nature conservation, sprawl, and development in the Toronto region at the turn of the twenty-first century. This book provides a careful, multi-faceted history and policy analysis of planning issues and citizen activism on the Moraine’s future in the face of rapid urban expansion. The Oak Ridges Moraine Battles captures the hidden aspects of a story that received a great deal of attention in the local and national news, and that ultimately led to provincial legislation aimed at protecting the Moraine and Ontario’s Greenbelt. By giving voice to a range of actors – residents, activists, civil servants, scientists, developers and aggregate and other resource users, the book demonstrates how space on the urban periphery was reshaped in the Toronto region. The authors ask hard questions about who is included and excluded when the preservation of nature challenges the relentless process of urbanization.