Search Results for "darwin-and-theories-of-aesthetics-and-cultural-history"

Darwin and Theories of Aesthetics and Cultural History

Darwin and Theories of Aesthetics and Cultural History

  • Author: Barbara Larson,Sabine Flach
  • Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.
  • ISBN: 9781409448709
  • Category: Art
  • Page: 176
  • View: 7603
DOWNLOAD NOW »
Darwin and Theories of Aesthetics and Cultural History is a significant contribution to the fields of theory, Darwin studies, and cultural history. This collection of eight essays is the first volume to address, from the point of view of art and literary historians, Darwin's intersections with aesthetic theories and cultural histories from the eighteenth century to the present day. Among the philosophers of art influenced by Darwinian evolution and considered in this collection are Alois Riegl, Ruskin, and Aby Warburg. This stimulating collection ranges in content from essays on the influence of eighteenth-century aesthetic theory on Darwin and nineteenth-century debates circulating around beauty to the study of evolutionary models in contemporary art.

Evolution and Victorian Culture

Evolution and Victorian Culture

  • Author: Bernard V. Lightman,Bennett Zon
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press
  • ISBN: 1139992309
  • Category: Literary Criticism
  • Page: N.A
  • View: 462
DOWNLOAD NOW »
In this collection of essays from leading scholars, the dynamic interplay between evolution and Victorian culture is explored for the first time, mapping new relationships between the arts and sciences. Rather than focusing simply on evolution and literature or art, this volume brings together essays exploring the impact of evolutionary ideas on a wide range of cultural activities including painting, sculpture, dance, music, fiction, poetry, cinema, architecture, theatre, photography, museums, exhibitions and popular culture. Broad-ranging, rather than narrowly specialized, each chapter provides a brief introduction to key scholarship, a central section exploring original insights drawn from primary source material, and a conclusion offering overarching principles and a projection towards further areas of research. Each chapter covers the work of significant individuals and groups applying evolutionary theory to their particular art, both as theorists and practitioners. This comprehensive examination of topics sheds light on larger and previously unknown Victorian cultural patterns.

The Art of Evolution

The Art of Evolution

Darwin, Darwinisms, and Visual Culture

  • Author: Barbara Jean Larson
  • Publisher: UPNE
  • ISBN: 9781584657750
  • Category: Art
  • Page: 332
  • View: 749
DOWNLOAD NOW »
A timely and stimulating collection of essays about the impact of Darwin's ideas on visual culture

Charles Darwin and Victorian Visual Culture

Charles Darwin and Victorian Visual Culture

  • Author: Jonathan Smith
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press
  • ISBN: 0521856906
  • Category: Literary Criticism
  • Page: 349
  • View: 5490
DOWNLOAD NOW »
A highly illustrated account of Darwin's visual representations of his theories, and their influence on Victorian literature, art and culture, first published in 2006.

Darwin's Screens

Darwin's Screens

Evolutionary Aesthetics, Time and Sexual Display in the Cinema

  • Author: Barbara Creed
  • Publisher: Academic Monographs
  • ISBN: 9780522860023
  • Category: Performing Arts
  • Page: 256
  • View: 9432
DOWNLOAD NOW »
'Barbara Creed's intriguing study offers more than new insights into the origins of the cinema. Even more ambitious, it offers an alternative history of Western film as seen through the lens of Darwinism.'-Professor Jonathan Smith, University of Michigan, author of Charles Darwin and Victorian Visual Culture 'The central argument of Darwin's Screens is delivered with a breadth and scope of vision that leaves the reader in little doubt that Creed's study will have a significant impact on our understanding of contemporary cinema.'-Professor Tony Bennett, The Open University, author of The Birth of the Museum: History, Theory, Politics 'What a wonderful book! Barbara Creed's wide-ranging study soars-to take on the evolutionary implications of the movies, spanning classic horror, to science fiction, to film noir.'-Professor Barbara Maria Stafford, University of Chicago, author of Echo Objects: The Cognitive Work of Images Darwin's Screens addresses a major gap in film scholarship-the key influence of Charles Darwin's theories on the history of the cinema. Much has been written on the effect of other great thinkers such as Freud and Marx but very little on the important role played by Darwinian ideas on the evolution of the newest art form of the twentieth century. Creed argues that Darwinian ideas influenced the evolution of early film genres such as horror, the detective film, science fiction, film noir and the musical. Her study draws on Darwin's theories of sexual selection, deep time and transformation, and on emotions, death, and the meaning of human and animal in order to rethink some of the canonical arguments of film and cinema studies.

The Elusive Synthesis: Aesthetics and Science

The Elusive Synthesis: Aesthetics and Science

  • Author: A.I. Tauber
  • Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
  • ISBN: 9400917864
  • Category: Science
  • Page: 329
  • View: 8509
DOWNLOAD NOW »
The tension between art and science may be traced back to the Greeks. What became "natural philosophy" and later "science" has traditionally been posed as a fundamental alternative to poetry and art. It is a theme that has commanded central attention in Western thought, as it captures the ancient conflict of Apollo and Dionysus over what deserves to order our thought and serve as the aspiration of our cultural efforts. The modern schi sm between art and science was again clearly articulated in the Romantic period and seemingly grew to a crescendo fifty years aga as a result of the debate concerning atomic power. The discussion has not abated in the physical sciences, and in fact has dramatically expanded most prominently into the domains of ecology and medicine. Issues concerning the role of science in modern society, although heavily political, must be regarded at heart as deeply embedded in our cultural values. Although each generation addresses them anew, the philosophical problems which lay at the foundation of these fundamental concerns always appear fresh and difficult. This anthology of original essays considers how science might have a greater commonality with art than was perhaps realized in a more positivist era. The contributors are concerned with how the aesthetic participates in science, both as a factor in constructing theory and influencing practice. The collec tion is thus no less than a spectrum of how Beauty and Science might be regarded through the same prism.

America's Darwin

America's Darwin

Darwinian Theory and U.S. Literary Culture

  • Author: Tina Gianquitto,Lydia Fisher
  • Publisher: University of Georgia Press
  • ISBN: 0820346756
  • Category: Literary Criticism
  • Page: 401
  • View: 9751
DOWNLOAD NOW »
An engaging collection of interdisciplinary essays on the distinctive qualities of America's textual engagement with Darwinian evolutionary theory, especially in regard to On the Origin of Species, which highlights the influence of prevalent cultural anxieties on interpretation.

Rethinking Cultural-Historical Theory

Rethinking Cultural-Historical Theory

A Dialectical Perspective to Vygotsky

  • Author: Manolis Dafermos
  • Publisher: Springer
  • ISBN: 9811301913
  • Category: Education
  • Page: 309
  • View: 634
DOWNLOAD NOW »
This book is an exploration of science in the making. It offers readers the opportunity to critically reflect on the process of development of Vygotsky's research program from the perspective of dialectics, focusing on the dramatic process of building and rebuilding cultural historical theory. Vygotsky's creative and dramatic journey is no less important than the concrete results of his research. An epistemological and historical investigation of the formulation of cultural historical theory sheds light on the process of knowledge production and reveals hidden dimensions of creativity in science.

The Literary and Cultural Reception of Charles Darwin in Europe

The Literary and Cultural Reception of Charles Darwin in Europe

  • Author: Thomas F. Glick,Elinor Shaffer
  • Publisher: A&C Black
  • ISBN: 1780937121
  • Category: Literary Criticism
  • Page: 656
  • View: 7769
DOWNLOAD NOW »
Beyond his pivotal place in the history of scientific thought, Charles Darwin's writings and his theory of evolution by natural selection have also had a profound impact on art and culture and continue to do so to this day. The Literary and Cultural Reception of Charles Darwin in Europe is a comprehensive survey of this enduring cultural impact throughout the continent. With chapters written by leading international scholars that explore how literary writers and popular culture responded to Darwin's thought, the book also includes an extensive timeline of his cultural reception in Europe and bibliographies of major translations in each country.

Making the Body Beautiful

Making the Body Beautiful

A Cultural History of Aesthetic Surgery

  • Author: Sander L. Gilman
  • Publisher: Princeton University Press
  • ISBN: 9780691070537
  • Category: Medical
  • Page: 396
  • View: 9805
DOWNLOAD NOW »
Nose reconstructions have been common in India for centuries. South Korea, Brazil, and Israel have become international centers for procedures ranging from eyelid restructuring to buttock lifts and tummy tucks. Argentina has the highest rate of silicone implants in the world. Around the globe, aesthetic surgery has become a cultural and medical fixture. Sander Gilman seeks to explain why by presenting the first systematic world history and cultural theory of aesthetic surgery. Touching on subjects as diverse as getting a "nose job" as a sweet-sixteen birthday present and the removal of male breasts in seventh-century Alexandria, Gilman argues that aesthetic surgery has such universal appeal because it helps people to "pass," to be seen as a member of a group with which they want to or need to identify. Gilman begins by addressing basic questions about the history of aesthetic surgery. What surgical procedures have been performed? Which are considered aesthetic and why? Who are the patients? What is the place of aesthetic surgery in modern culture? He then turns his attention to that focus of countless human anxieties: the nose. Gilman discusses how people have reshaped their noses to repair the ravages of war and disease (principally syphilis), to match prevailing ideas of beauty, and to avoid association with negative images of the "Jew," the "Irish," the "Oriental," or the "Black." He examines how we have used aesthetic surgery on almost every conceivable part of the body to try to pass as younger, stronger, thinner, and more erotic. Gilman also explores some of the extremes of surgery as personal transformation, discussing transgender surgery, adult circumcision and foreskin restoration, the enhancement of dueling scars, and even a performance artist who had herself altered to resemble the Mona Lisa. The book draws on an extraordinary range of sources. Gilman is as comfortable discussing Nietzsche, Yeats, and Darwin as he is grisly medical details, Michael Jackson, and Barbra Streisand's decision to keep her own nose. The book contains dozens of arresting images of people before, during, and after surgery. This is a profound, provocative, and engaging study of how humans have sought to change their lives by transforming their bodies.

Evolution in the Arts

Evolution in the Arts

And Other Theories of Culture History

  • Author: Thomas Munro
  • Publisher: N.A
  • ISBN: N.A
  • Category: Art
  • Page: 561
  • View: 5591
DOWNLOAD NOW »

The Poetry of Erasmus Darwin

The Poetry of Erasmus Darwin

Enlightened Spaces, Romantic Times

  • Author: Professor Martin Priestman
  • Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.
  • ISBN: 1472419561
  • Category: Literary Criticism
  • Page: 324
  • View: 4378
DOWNLOAD NOW »
While historians of science have focused significant attention on Erasmus Darwin’s scientific ideas and milieu, relatively little attention has been paid to Darwin as a literary writer. In The Poetry of Erasmus Darwin: Enlightened Spaces, Romantic Times, Martin Priestman situates Darwin’s three major poems - The Loves of the Plants (1789), The Economy of Vegetation (1791) and The Temple of Nature (1803) - and Darwin himself within a large, polymathic late-Enlightenment network of other scientists, writers, thinkers and social movers and shakers. Interpreting Darwin’s poetry in terms of Darwin’s broader sense of the poetic text as a material space, he posits a significant shift from the Enlightenment’s emphases on conceptual spaces to the Romantic period’s emphases on historical time. He shows how Darwin’s poetry illuminates his stance toward all the major physical sciences and his well-formulated theories of evolution and materially based psychology. Priestman’s study also offers the first substantial accounts of Darwin’s mythological theories and their links to Enlightenment Rosicrucianism and Freemansonry, and of the reading of history that emerges from the fragment-poem The Progress of Society, a first-ever printed edition of which is included in an appendix. Ultimately, Priestman’s book offers readers a sustained account of Darwin’s polymathic Enlightenment worldview and cognate poetics in a period when texts are too often judged by their adherence to a retrospectively constructed ‘Romanticism’.

The Seductions of Darwin

The Seductions of Darwin

Art, Evolution, Neuroscience

  • Author: Matthew Rampley
  • Publisher: Penn State Press
  • ISBN: 0271079002
  • Category: History
  • Page: 200
  • View: 9041
DOWNLOAD NOW »
The surge of evolutionary and neurological analyses of art and its effects raises questions of how art, culture, and the biological sciences influence one another, and what we gain in applying scientific methods to the interpretation of artwork. In this insightful book, Matthew Rampley addresses these questions by exploring key areas where Darwinism, neuroscience, and art history intersect. Taking a scientific approach to understanding art has led to novel and provocative ideas about its origins, the basis of aesthetic experience, and the nature of research into art and the humanities. Rampley’s inquiry examines models of artistic development, the theories and development of aesthetic response, and ideas about brain processes underlying creative work. He considers the validity of the arguments put forward by advocates of evolutionary and neuroscientific analysis, as well as its value as a way of understanding art and culture. With the goal of bridging the divide between science and culture, Rampley advocates for wider recognition of the human motivations that drive inquiry of all types, and he argues that our engagement with art can never be encapsulated in a single notion of scientific knowledge. Engaging and compelling, The Seductions of Darwin is a rewarding look at the identity and development of art history and its complicated ties to the world of scientific thought.

Literatur, Wissenschaft und Wissen seit der Epochenschwelle um 1800

Literatur, Wissenschaft und Wissen seit der Epochenschwelle um 1800

Theorie – Epistemologie – komparatistische Fallstudien

  • Author: Thomas Klinkert,Monika Neuhofer
  • Publisher: Walter de Gruyter
  • ISBN: 3110208180
  • Category: Literary Criticism
  • Page: 399
  • View: 1097
DOWNLOAD NOW »
Although literature gained its autonomy around 1800, it has since then continually engaged in a poetologically relevant discourse with the alien system of science. The present volume examines this phenomenon from a comparatistic perspective, and considers the following questions: System theory : What is the status of the autonomy of a system if it engages with another system through more than casual borrowings? Aesthetics of representation : What consequences do references to science have for literary form and style? Epistemology: Does literature transmit its own knowledge? If it does, of what does this knowledge consist, and how is it distinguished from non-literary knowledge?

Modern Theories of Art 2

Modern Theories of Art 2

From Impressionism to Kandinsky

  • Author: Moshe Barasch
  • Publisher: NYU Press
  • ISBN: 0814739482
  • Category: Art
  • Page: 401
  • View: 2483
DOWNLOAD NOW »
In this volume, the third in his classic series of texts surveying the history of art theory, Moshe Barasch traces the hidden patterns and interlocking themes in the study of art, from Impressionism to Abstract Art. Barasch details the immense social changes in the creation, presentation, and reception of art which have set the history of art theory on a vertiginous new course: the decreased relevance of workshops and art schools; the replacement of the treatise by the critical review; and the interrelation of new modes of scientific inquiry with artistic theory and praxis. The consequent changes in the ways in which critics as well as artists conceptualized paintings and sculptures were radical, marked by an obsession with intense, immediate sensory experiences, psychological reflection on the effects of art, and a magnetic pull to the exotic and alien, making for the most exciting and fertile period in the history of art criticism.

Evolutionary and Neurocognitive Approaches to Aesthetics, Creativity, and the Arts

Evolutionary and Neurocognitive Approaches to Aesthetics, Creativity, and the Arts

  • Author: Colin Martindale,Paul Locher,V. M. Petrov
  • Publisher: N.A
  • ISBN: N.A
  • Category: Psychology
  • Page: 247
  • View: 4300
DOWNLOAD NOW »
In this book, well-known scholars describe new and exciting approaches to aesthetics, creativity, and psychology of the arts, approaching these topics from a point of view that is biological or related to biology and answering new questions with new methods and theories. All known societies produce and enjoy arts such as literature, music, and visual decoration or depiction. Judging from prehistoric archaeological evidence, this arose very early in human development. Furthermore, Darwin was explicit in attributing aesthetic sensitivity to lower animals. These considerations lead us to wonder whether the arts might not be evolutionarily based. Although such an evolutionary basis is not obvious on the face of it, the idea has recently elicited considerable attention. The book begins with a consideration of ten theories on the evolutionary function of the arts, and this is followed by several chapters that consider the possible evolutionary function of specific arts such as music and literature. The theory of evolution was first drawn up in biology, but evolution is not confined to biology: genuinely evolutionary theories of sociocultural change can be formulated. That they need to be formulated is shown in several chapters that discuss regular trends in literature and scientific writings. Psychologists have recently rediscovered the obvious fact that thought and perception occur in the brain, so cognitive science moves ever closer to neuroscience. Several chapters give overviews of neurocognitive and neural network approaches to creativity and aesthetic appreciation. The book concludes with two exciting chapters describing brain-scan research on what happens in the brain during creativity and presenting a close examination of the relationship between genetically transmitted mental disorder and creativity.

Queer Beauty

Queer Beauty

Sexuality and Aesthetics from Winckelmann to Freud and Beyond

  • Author: Whitney Davis
  • Publisher: Columbia University Press
  • ISBN: 0231519559
  • Category: Philosophy
  • Page: 416
  • View: 3808
DOWNLOAD NOW »
The pioneering work of Johann Winckelmann (1717-1768) identified a homoerotic appreciation of male beauty in classical Greek sculpture, a fascination that had endured in Western art since the Greeks. Yet after Winckelmann, the value (even the possibility) of art's queer beauty was often denied. Several theorists, notably the philosopher Immanuel Kant, broke sexual attraction and aesthetic appreciation into separate or dueling domains. In turn, sexual desire and aesthetic pleasure had to be profoundly rethought by later writers. Whitney Davis follows how such innovative thinkers as John Addington Symonds, Michel Foucault, and Richard Wollheim rejoined these two domains, reclaiming earlier insights about the mutual implication of sexuality and aesthetics. Addressing texts by Arthur Schopenhauer, Charles Darwin, Oscar Wilde, Vernon Lee, and Sigmund Freud, among many others, Davis criticizes modern approaches, such as Kantian idealism, Darwinism, psychoanalysis, and analytic aesthetics, for either reducing aesthetics to a question of sexuality or for removing sexuality from the aesthetic field altogether. Despite these schematic reductions, sexuality always returns to aesthetics, and aesthetic considerations always recur in sexuality. Davis particularly emphasizes the way in which philosophies of art since the late eighteenth century have responded to nonstandard sexuality, especially homoeroticism, and how theories of nonstandard sexuality have drawn on aesthetics in significant ways. Many imaginative and penetrating critics have wrestled productively, though often inconclusively and "against themselves," with the aesthetic making of sexual life and new forms of art made from reconstituted sexualities. Through a critique that confronts history, philosophy, science, psychology, and dominant theories of art and sexuality, Davis challenges privileged types of sexual and aesthetic creation imagined in modern culture-and assumed today.

Aesthetics & Alienation

Aesthetics & Alienation

  • Author: Gary Tedman
  • Publisher: John Hunt Publishing
  • ISBN: 1780993021
  • Category: Philosophy
  • Page: 273
  • View: 8628
DOWNLOAD NOW »
A complete and original theory of aesthetics based on Marx and Althusser in the modernist Marxist anti-humanist tradition (Brecht, Althusser, Benjamin, Adorno). The main concepts that arise from this work are: the aesthetic level of practice, aesthetic state apparatuses, aesthetic interpellation, and pseudo dialectics, all of which are used to understand the role of aesthetic experience and its place in everyday life. - In the space long thought as necessary to fill spanning the gap between Marx and Freud, the author proposes that aesthetics can be located and defined in a concrete way. We are therefore looking at a domain involving and implicating feelings, affections, dispositions, sensibilities and sensuality, as well as their social role in art, tradition, ritual, and taboo. With the classic Marxist concepts of base and superstructure divided into levels, economic, ideological, and political, the aesthetic level of practice is the area that has traditionally been mostly either missing or mislocated and, especially perhaps, misrepresented for political reasons. The importance of this level is that it fuels and supports the media, or as Althusser described it the 'traffic' (or mediation) between base and superstructure, although for Althusser this was ideological traffic. Here, this is also defined as aesthetic. From this vantage point, we begin to be able to see aesthetic state apparatuses, analyse how they function, both in the past, historically (for example firstly in art history), and today, in the contemporary political context, to grasp the role that art and feelings, along with affective alienation, plays in our culture as a complete and, in fact, cyclical reciprocating system.

The Romantic Conception of Life

The Romantic Conception of Life

Science and Philosophy in the Age of Goethe

  • Author: Robert J. Richards
  • Publisher: University of Chicago Press
  • ISBN: 0226712184
  • Category: Science
  • Page: 606
  • View: 4862
DOWNLOAD NOW »
"All art should become science and all science art; poetry and philosophy should be made one." Friedrich Schlegel's words perfectly capture the project of the German Romantics, who believed that the aesthetic approaches of art and literature could reveal patterns and meaning in nature that couldn't be uncovered through rationalistic philosophy and science alone. In this wide-ranging work, Robert J. Richards shows how the Romantic conception of the world influenced (and was influenced by) both the lives of the people who held it and the development of nineteenth-century science. Integrating Romantic literature, science, and philosophy with an intimate knowledge of the individuals involved—from Goethe and the brothers Schlegel to Humboldt and Friedrich and Caroline Schelling—Richards demonstrates how their tempestuous lives shaped their ideas as profoundly as their intellectual and cultural heritage. He focuses especially on how Romantic concepts of the self, as well as aesthetic and moral considerations—all tempered by personal relationships—altered scientific representations of nature. Although historians have long considered Romanticism at best a minor tributary to scientific thought, Richards moves it to the center of the main currents of nineteenth-century biology, culminating in the conception of nature that underlies Darwin's evolutionary theory. Uniting the personal and poetic aspects of philosophy and science in a way that the German Romantics themselves would have honored, The Romantic Conception of Life alters how we look at Romanticism and nineteenth-century biology.