Search Results for "dionysus-myth-and-cult"

Dionysus

Dionysus

Myth and Cult

  • Author: Walter Friedrich Otto
  • Publisher: Indiana University Press
  • ISBN: 9780253208910
  • Category: History
  • Page: 243
  • View: 2776
DOWNLOAD NOW »
"This study of Dionysus... is also a new theogony of Early Greece." —Publishers Weekly "An original analysis... of the spiritual significance of the Greek myth and cult of Dionysus." —Theology Digest

Insanity and Genius

Insanity and Genius

Masks of Madness and the Mapping of Meaning and Value (Second Edition)

  • Author: Harry Eiss
  • Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing
  • ISBN: 1443860867
  • Category: Philosophy
  • Page: 770
  • View: 9058
DOWNLOAD NOW »
In his book about the discovery of the structure of DNA, James Watson wrote, “So we had lunch, telling ourselves that a structure this beautiful just had to exist.” Indeed, the quest most often asked by scientists about a scientific theory is “Is it beautiful?” Yes, beauty equals truth. Scientists know, mathematicians know. But the beauties, the truths of mathematics and science were not the truths that inspired the author as a child, and he intuitively knew that the truths he needed come from a different way of knowing, a way of knowing not of the world of logic and reason and explanation (though they have a value), but rather a way of knowing that is of the world expression, a world that enters the truths beyond the grasp of logic. That is what this book is all about. It is an exploration of the greatest minds of human existence struggling to understand the deepest truths of the human condition. This second edition updates the previous one, incorporating new publications on Van Gogh, recent discoveries in neurology, psychology, and the rapid developments in understanding DNA and biotechnology. We’ve come a long way already from that original discovery by Watson and his coauthor Francis Crick.

The Fairy Feller’s Master-Stroke

The Fairy Feller’s Master-Stroke

  • Author: Harry Eiss
  • Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing
  • ISBN: 1443844888
  • Category: History
  • Page: 250
  • View: 4400
DOWNLOAD NOW »
Richard Dadd is a trickster, a pre-post-modern enigma wrapped in a Shakespearean Midsummer Night’s Dream; an Elizabethan Puck living in a smothering Victorian insane asylum, foreshadowing and, in brilliant, Mad Hatter conundrums, entering the fragmented shards of today’s nightmarish oxymorons long before the artists currently trying to give them the joker’s ephemeral maps of discourse. The author thinks of Bob Dylan’s “Ballad of a Thin Man,” that cryptic refusal to reduce the warped mirrors of reality to prosaic lies, or, perhaps “All Along the Watchtower” or “Mr Tambourine Man.” Even more than Samuel Beckett’s Waiting for Godot, which curiously enough comes off as overly esoteric, too studied, too conscious, Dadd’s entire existence foreshadows the forbidden entrance into the numinous, the realization of the inexplicable labyrinths of contemporary existence, that wonderfully rich Marcel Duchamp landscape of puns and satiric paradigms, that surrealistic parallax of the brilliant gamester Salvador Dali, that smirking irony of the works of Roy Lichtenstein, Robert Rauschenberg, John Cage, and Robert Indiana; that fragmented, meta-fictional struggle of Kurt Vonnegut’s Slaughterhouse Five. John Lennon certainly sensed it and couldn’t help but push into meta-real worlds in his own lyrics. Think of “Strawberry Fields Forever,” “I Am the Walrus,” and the more self-conscious “Revolution Number 9.” In “Yer Blues,” he even refers to Dylan’s main character, Mr Jones from “Ballad of a Thin Man.” If Lennon’s song is taken seriously, literally, then it is a dark crying out by a suicidal man, “Lord, I’m lonely, wanna die”; or, if taken as a metaphor for a lover’s lost feelings about his unfulfilled love, it falls into the romantic rant of a typical blues or teenage rock-and-roll song. However, even on this level, it has an irony about it, a sense of laughing at itself and at Dylan’s Mr Jones, who knows something is going on but just not what it is, and then, by extension, all of us who have awakened to the fact that the studied Western world doesn’t make sense, all of us who struggle to find meaning in the nonsense images, characters, and happenings in the song, and perhaps, coming to a conclusion that the nonsense is the sense.

The Body and the Book

The Body and the Book

Writings on Poetry and Sexuality

  • Author: Glennis Byron,Andrew J. Sneddon
  • Publisher: Rodopi
  • ISBN: 9042024224
  • Category: History
  • Page: 360
  • View: 8068
DOWNLOAD NOW »
The stimulating mix of academics and practising poets that have contributed to this volume provides an unusual and illuminating integration of critical and creative practice and a vibrantly diverse approach to questions of poetry and sexuality. Each section of essays is complemented by poems which creatively illustrate or develop the theme with which the essays critically engage. Rather than being limited to a specific genre, tradition, time or place, this collection seeks to make a virtue of contrast, comparison and juxtaposition. The collection is arranged into sections that range broadly across the thematic ground of dichotomies, traditions and revisions, microscopic and macroscopic perspectives, women and embodiment, and the notion of play and performance. Positioning eighteenth-century tinkers ballads alongside medieval Hebrew lyrics and the Blues of Gorgeous Puddin¿, or making Dionysus rub shoulders with Sharon Olds and Mrs Rochester provides new perspectives on familiar material and valuable insights into more obscure work and the nature of sensual poetry as a mode of expression. As the editors suggest, the essays and poems presented collectively argue that writings about sexuality are always already about the way poets see and represent our bodies, the world and poetic language itself.

Myths of Freedom

Myths of Freedom

Equality, Modern Thought, and Philosophical Radicalism

  • Author: Stephen L. Gardner
  • Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group
  • ISBN: 9780313307249
  • Category: Philosophy
  • Page: 197
  • View: 1553
DOWNLOAD NOW »
The driving force behind modern thought is the new potential for equality, which intensifies the violence and volatility in human relations, catalyzing the modern world. This is reflected, but not always made transparent, Stephen Gardner asserts, in the myths of freedom that govern modern culture and the basic framework of modern thought. The original intent of freedom for early modern thinkers was to establish a principle of order or rank to stabilize the volatility of equality. But, backfiring, in later modern thought, freedom supplies a justificatory myth for "master-slave" relations arising within equality.

Dionysiac Poetics and Euripides' Bacchae

Dionysiac Poetics and Euripides' Bacchae

  • Author: Charles Segal
  • Publisher: Princeton University Press
  • ISBN: 9780691015972
  • Category: Literary Criticism
  • Page: 420
  • View: 7988
DOWNLOAD NOW »
Includes afterword (p. 349-393) by the author: Dionysus and the Bacchae in the light of recent scholarship.

The Oxford Companion to Classical Civilization

The Oxford Companion to Classical Civilization

  • Author: Simon Hornblower,Antony Spawforth,Esther Eidinow
  • Publisher: OUP Oxford
  • ISBN: 0191016764
  • Category: History
  • Page: 912
  • View: 2774
DOWNLOAD NOW »
What did the ancient Greeks eat and drink? What role did migration play? Why was emperor Nero popular with the ordinary people but less so with the upper classes? Why (according to ancient authors) was Oedipus ('with swollen foot') so called? For over 2,000 years the civilizations of ancient Greece and Rome have captivated our collective imagination and provided inspiration for so many aspects of our lives, from culture, literature, drama, cinema, and television to society, education, and politics. Many of the roots of the way life is lived in the West today can be traced to the ancient civilizations, not only in politics, law, technology, philosophy, and science, but also in social and family life, language, and art. Beautiful illustrations, clear and authoritative entries, and a useful chronology and bibliography make this Companion the perfect guide for readers interested in learning more about the Graeco-Roman world. As well as providing sound information on all aspects of classical civilization such as history, politics, ethics, morals, law, society, religion, mythology, science and technology, language, literature, art, and scholarship, the entries in the Companion reflect the changing interdisciplinary aspects of classical studies, covering broad thematic subjects, such as race, nationalism, gender, ethics, and ecology, confirming the impact classical civilizations have had on the modern world.

Dionysus Resurrected

Dionysus Resurrected

Performances of Euripides' The Bacchae in a Globalizing World

  • Author: Erika Fischer-Lichte
  • Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
  • ISBN: 1118609751
  • Category: Literary Criticism
  • Page: 264
  • View: 6192
DOWNLOAD NOW »
Dionysus Resurrected analyzes the global resurgence sincethe late 1960s of Euripides’ The Bacchae. By analyzingand contextualizing these modern day performances, the authorreveals striking parallels between transformational events takingplace during the era of the play’s revival and events withinthe play itself. Puts forward a lively discussion of the parallels betweentransformational eventsduring the era of the play’s revivaland events within the play itself The first comparative study to analyse and contextualizeperformances of The Bacchae that took place between 1968 and2009 from the United States, Africa, Latin America, Europe andAsia Argues that presentations of the play not only representliminal states but also transfer the spectators into suchstates Contends that the play’s reflection on various stages ofglobalization render the tragedy a contemporary play Establishes the importance of The Bacchae withinEuripides’ work as the only extant tragedy in which the godDionysus himself appears, not just as a character but as theprotagonist

Dancing in the Streets

Dancing in the Streets

A History of Collective Joy

  • Author: Barbara Ehrenreich
  • Publisher: Metropolitan Books
  • ISBN: 9781429904650
  • Category: History
  • Page: 336
  • View: 8578
DOWNLOAD NOW »
From the bestselling social commentator and cultural historian, a fascinating exploration of one of humanity's oldest traditions: the celebration of communal joy In the acclaimed Blood Rites, Barbara Ehrenreich delved into the origins of our species' attraction to war. Here, she explores the opposite impulse, one that has been so effectively suppressed that we lack even a term for it: the desire for collective joy, historically expressed in ecstatic revels of feasting, costuming, and dancing. Ehrenreich uncovers the origins of communal celebration in human biology and culture. Although sixteenth-century Europeans viewed mass festivities as foreign and "savage," Ehrenreich shows that they were indigenous to the West, from the ancient Greeks' worship of Dionysus to the medieval practice of Christianity as a "danced religion." Ultimately, church officials drove the festivities into the streets, the prelude to widespread reformation: Protestants criminalized carnival, Wahhabist Muslims battled ecstatic Sufism, European colonizers wiped out native dance rites. The elites' fear that such gatherings would undermine social hierarchies was justified: the festive tradition inspired French revolutionary crowds and uprisings from the Caribbean to the American plains. Yet outbreaks of group revelry persist, as Ehrenreich shows, pointing to the 1960s rock-and-roll rebellion and the more recent "carnivalization" of sports. Original, exhilarating, and deeply optimistic, Dancing in the Streets concludes that we are innately social beings, impelled to share our joy and therefore able to envision, even create, a more peaceable future.

Gargoyles, Grotesques & Green Men

Gargoyles, Grotesques & Green Men

Ancient Symbolism in European and American Architecture

  • Author: Gary R. Varner
  • Publisher: Lulu.com
  • ISBN: 1435711424
  • Category: History
  • Page: 180
  • View: 2677
DOWNLOAD NOW »
The symbols and strange images that we find in our cemeteries, religious structures, banks and in our parks are the same symbols that have been part of the framework of the human psyche for thousands of years. While contemporary man may think that they are simply decorative manifestations of a by-gone era, they represent the fears, dreams, ideas, beliefs and struggles that humankind has endured since we began to walk upright. This book surveys many of these icons and will give a meaning for them both in the context of ancient history and folklore as well as a meaning that is suitable for our contemporary times. Illustrated with dozens of photographs, this book will be of interest to anyone interested in historic preservation, ancient symbolism, the Green Man and the universal application of imagery. Gary R. Varner has written numerous books on ancient traditions, folklore, the environment and contemporary issues. He is a member of the American Folklore Society and the Foundation for Mythological Studies.

Dare to Struggle

Dare to Struggle

The History and Society of Greece

  • Author: Richard M. Berthold
  • Publisher: iUniverse
  • ISBN: 1440163952
  • Category: History
  • Page: 268
  • View: 3301
DOWNLOAD NOW »
WHY SHOULD YOU READ A GREEK HISTORY? Because you simply cannot consider yourself an educated person unless you know something about the society of ancient Greece. Because the Greeks discovered the foundation elements of Western society: constitutionalism, rationalism, humanism and the individual. Because Greek history is in effect our own history. Because the Greeks were seriously cool. WHY SHOULD YOU READ THISGREEK HISTORY? Because it answers the important questions that others do not. Because it relates Greek history to contemporary society. Because it covers ALL the topics. Because it is NOT boring or politically correct.

The Aesthetics of the Greek Banquet

The Aesthetics of the Greek Banquet

Images of Wine and Ritual

  • Author: François Lissarrague
  • Publisher: Princeton University Press
  • ISBN: 1400861152
  • Category: Crafts & Hobbies
  • Page: 160
  • View: 6885
DOWNLOAD NOW »
In deepening our understanding of the symposium in ancient Greece, this book embodies the wit and play of the images it explains: those decorating Athenian drinking vessels from the sixth and fifth centuries B.C. The vases used at banquets often depict the actual drinkers who commissioned their production and convey the flowing together of wine, poetry, music, games, flirtation, and other elements that formed the complex structure of the banquet itself. A close reading of the objects handled by drinkers in the images reveals various metaphors, particularly that of wine as sea, all expressing a wide range of attitudes toward an ambiguous substance that brings cheer but may also cause harm. Not only does this work offer an anthropological view of ancient Greece, but it explores a precise iconographic system. In so doing it will encourage and enrich further reflection on the role of the image in a given culture. Originally published in 1990. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback and hardcover editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.

The Alphabet Versus the Goddess

The Alphabet Versus the Goddess

The Conflict Between Word and Image

  • Author: Leonard Shlain
  • Publisher: Penguin
  • ISBN: 1101573910
  • Category: Social Science
  • Page: 496
  • View: 8929
DOWNLOAD NOW »
This groundbreaking book proposes that the rise of alphabetic literacy reconfigured the human brain and brought about profound changes in history, religion, and gender relations. Making remarkable connections across brain function, myth, and anthropology, Dr. Shlain shows why pre-literate cultures were principally informed by holistic, right-brain modes that venerated the Goddess, images, and feminine values. Writing drove cultures toward linear left-brain thinking and this shift upset the balance between men and women, initiating the decline of the feminine and ushering in patriarchal rule. Examining the cultures of the Israelites, Greeks, Christians, and Muslims, Shlain reinterprets ancient myths and parables in light of his theory. Provocative and inspiring, this book is a paradigm-shattering work that will transform your view of history and the mind.

Harvesting Darkness

Harvesting Darkness

Essays on Literature, Myth, Film and Culture

  • Author: Dennis Slattery
  • Publisher: iUniverse
  • ISBN: 0595384528
  • Category: Literary Collections
  • Page: 380
  • View: 2606
DOWNLOAD NOW »
As Dennis Patrick Slattery's writing shows, the very stuff of the great traditions is life itself, and the hurly-burly of current culture is the ground in which tradition thrives. Slattery's analyses are keen and thoughtful, often scholarly, and always deeply spiritual. But they are better for being a bit pugnacious and intimate and virile. They give evidence of a life lived in earnest, one in which nothing is walled off into a category but all enters into the whole that is the mysterious grounding of the person.Foreword by Louise Cowan, Author of The Fugitive Group Series Editor: The Terrain of Comedy, The Epic Cosmos, And The Tragic Abyss. Founder: Institute of Philosophic Studies, The University of Dallas; the Teachers' Academy at the Dallas Institute of Humanities and Culture

Venice Incognito

Venice Incognito

Masks in the Serene Republic

  • Author: James H. Johnson
  • Publisher: Univ of California Press
  • ISBN: 0520267710
  • Category: History
  • Page: 317
  • View: 7156
DOWNLOAD NOW »
"Fascinating and richly developed. Venice Incognito is a contribution both to urban studies and to the carnivalesque."—Natalie Zemon Davis, University of Toronto “Venice Incognito is a brilliant reassessment of Venetian carnival and the peculiar phenomenon of masking in early modern Venice. Johnson's wide-ranging, insightful, and imaginative scholarship is matched by his fluid and accessible writing style. This book is that all-too-rare commodity: a scholarly page-turner.” —Patricia Fortini Brown, author of Private Lives in Renaissance Venice “This is a beautiful book about a strange subject: the custom among Venetian aristocrats of wearing masks in public. One of the most original works in early modern scholarship I have read in a long time, Venice Incognito will have a permanent place on most early modern historians’ shelves and will be essential reading for performance studies and theater history.” —Edward Muir, author of The Culture Wars of the Late Renaissance “In this fascinating book, the author cleverly balances the traditional concept of masking as an anti-authoritarian culture of dissembling with the idea of the 'honest mask,' which defends rank and the established order, and produces an excellent, nuanced, and well-written account of the carnivalesque in eighteenth-century Venice.” —Aileen Ribeiro, author of Dress in Eighteenth-Century Europe “In this intriguing and thoroughly researched book, James Johnson takes the reader through the crowded calli, campi, and canals of Venice in search of the varied meanings of the mask in the history and culture of that city on the water. From masking’s first recorded appearance in the thirteenth century to its ubiquity in the carnival decline of eighteenth-century Venice, from the dissimulations of Giacomo Casanova to Arlecchino and the commedia dell’arte stage, from the social anonymity of the gambling halls to the socially charged debate over Goldoni’s radical unmasking of the actor, Venice Incognito traces the shifting functions of the mask and its implications. Just as importantly, the book challenges much conventional wisdom about masking and carnival itself.” —David Rosand, author of Painting in Sixteenth-Century Venice

Bakchen

Bakchen

  • Author: Euripides,Friedrich Gotthold Schöne
  • Publisher: N.A
  • ISBN: N.A
  • Category:
  • Page: 120
  • View: 1938
DOWNLOAD NOW »

The archetype of the devil in twentieth-century literature

The archetype of the devil in twentieth-century literature

  • Author: Patricia Lou Kubis
  • Publisher: N.A
  • ISBN: N.A
  • Category: Literary Criticism
  • Page: 1008
  • View: 9842
DOWNLOAD NOW »

Architecture in the Age of Divided Representation

Architecture in the Age of Divided Representation

The Question of Creativity in the Shadow of Production

  • Author: Dalibor Vesely
  • Publisher: MIT Press
  • ISBN: 9780262220675
  • Category: Architecture
  • Page: 506
  • View: 3408
DOWNLOAD NOW »
Reclaiming the humanistic role of architecture in the age of technology: an examination of architecture's indispensable role as a cultural force throughout history.

Carnival, myth and cult

Carnival, myth and cult

  • Author: Alexander Orloff
  • Publisher: N.A
  • ISBN: 9783853990261
  • Category: Photography
  • Page: 259
  • View: 6260
DOWNLOAD NOW »