Search Results for "disappearing-war"

Disappearing War

Disappearing War

Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Cinema and Erasure in the Post 9/11 World

  • Author: Christina Hellmich
  • Publisher: Edinburgh University Press
  • ISBN: 1474416578
  • Category: Performing Arts
  • Page: 216
  • View: 3447
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The battles fought in the name of the 'war on terror' have re-ignited questions about the changing nature of war, and the experience of war for those geographically distant from its real world consequences. What is missing from our highly mediated experience of war? What are the intentional and unintentional processes of erasure through which the distortion happens? What are their consequences? Cinema is a key site at which questions about our highly mediated experience of war can be addressed or, more significantly, elided. Looking at a range of films that have provoked debate, from award-winning features like Zero Dark Thirty and American Sniper, to documentaries like Kill List and Dirty Wars, as well as at the work of visual artists like Harun Farocki and Omer Fast, this book examines the practices of erasure in the cinematic representation of recent military interventions. Drawing on representations of war-related death, dying and bodily damage, this provocative collection addresses 'what's missing' in existing scholarly responses to modern warfare; in film studies, as well as in politics and international relations.

An Improbable War?

An Improbable War?

The Outbreak of World War I and European Political Culture Before 1914

  • Author: Holger Afflerbach,David Stevenson
  • Publisher: Berghahn Books
  • ISBN: 0857453106
  • Category: History
  • Page: 365
  • View: 5489
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The First World War has been described as the "primordial catastrophe of the twentieth century." Arguably, Italian Fascism, German National Socialism and Soviet Leninism and Stalinism would not have emerged without the cultural and political shock of World War I. The question why this catastrophe happened therefore preoccupies historians to this day. The focus of this volume is not on the consequences, but rather on the connection between the Great War and the long 19th century, the short- and long-term causes of World War I. This approach results in the questioning of many received ideas about the war's causes, especially the notion of "inevitability."

Doris Lessing and the Forming of History

Doris Lessing and the Forming of History

  • Author: Kevin Brazil
  • Publisher: Edinburgh University Press
  • ISBN: 1474416586
  • Category:
  • Page: 256
  • View: 9769
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The death of Nobel Prize-winning Doris Lessing sparked a range of commemorations that cemented her place as one of the major figures of twentieth- and twenty-first-century world literature. This volume views Lessing's writing as a whole and in retrospect, focusing on her innovative attempts to rework literary form to engage with the challenges thrown up by the sweeping historical changes through which she lived. The 12 original chapters provide new readings of Lessing's work via contexts ranging from post-war youth politics and radical women's writing to European cinema, analyse her experiments with genres from realism to autobiography and science-fiction, and draw on previously unstudied archive material. The volume also explores how Lessing's writing can provide insight into some of the issues now shaping twenty-first century scholarship - including trauma, ecocriticism, the post-human, and world literature - as they emerge as defining challenges to our own present moment in history.

The Outbreak of the First World War

The Outbreak of the First World War

Structure, Politics, and Decision-Making

  • Author: Jack S. Levy,John A. Vasquez
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press
  • ISBN: 1107042453
  • Category: History
  • Page: 324
  • View: 3026
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Brings together leading historians and international relations scholars to debate the causes of the First World War.

The Racial Mundane

The Racial Mundane

Asian American Performance and the Embodied Everyday

  • Author: Ju Yon Kim
  • Publisher: NYU Press
  • ISBN: 1479821748
  • Category: Social Science
  • Page: 304
  • View: 9809
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Winner, Lois P. Rudnick Book Prize presented by the New England American Studies Association Across the twentieth century, national controversies involving Asian Americans have drawn attention to such seemingly unremarkable activities as eating rice, greeting customers, and studying for exams. While public debates about Asian Americans have invoked quotidian practices to support inconsistent claims about racial difference, diverse aesthetic projects have tested these claims by experimenting with the relationships among habit, body, and identity. In The Racial Mundane, Ju Yon Kim argues that the ambiguous relationship between behavioral tendencies and the body has sustained paradoxical characterizations of Asian Americans as ideal and impossible Americans. The body’s uncertain attachment to its routine motions promises alternately to materialize racial distinctions and to dissolve them. Kim’s study focuses on works of theater, fiction, and film that explore the interface between racialized bodies and everyday enactments to reveal new and latent affiliations. The various modes of performance developed in these works not only encourage audiences to see habitual behaviors differently, but also reveal the stakes of noticing such behaviors at all. Integrating studies of race, performance, and the everyday, The Racial Mundane invites readers to reflect on how and to what effect perfunctory behaviors become objects of public scrutiny.

The Month that Changed the World

The Month that Changed the World

July 1914 and WWI

  • Author: Gordon Martel
  • Publisher: OUP Oxford
  • ISBN: 0191643289
  • Category: History
  • Page: 416
  • View: 970
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On 28 June 1914 the Austrian Archduke Franz Ferdinand was assassinated in the Balkans. Five fateful weeks later the Great Powers of Europe were at war. Much time and ink has been spent ever since trying to identify the 'guilty' person or state responsible, or alternatively attempting to explain the underlying forces that 'inevitably' led to war in 1914. Unsatisfied with these explanations, Gordon Martel now goes back to the contemporary diplomatic, military, and political records to investigate the twists and turns of the crisis afresh, with the aim of establishing just how the catastrophe really unfurled. What emerges is the story of a terrible, unnecessary tragedy - one that can be understood only by retracing the steps taken by those who went down the road to war. With each passing day, we see how the personalities of leading figures such as Kaiser Wilhelm II, the Emperor Franz Joseph, Tsar Nicholas II, Sir Edward Grey, and Raymond Poincaré were central to the unfolding crisis, how their hopes and fears intersected as events unfolded, and how each new decision produced a response that complicated or escalated matters to the point where they became almost impossible to contain. Devoting a chapter to each day of the infamous 'July Crisis', this gripping step by step account of the descent to war makes clear just how little the conflict was in fact premeditated, preordained, or even predictable. Almost every day it seemed possible that the crisis could be settled as so many had been over the previous decade; almost every day there was a new suggestion that gave statesmen hope that war could be avoided without abandoning vital interests. And yet, as the last month of peace ebbed away, the actions and reactions of the Great Powers disastrously escalated the situation. So much so that, by the beginning of August, what might have remained a minor Balkan problem had turned into the cataclysm of the First World War.

Disappearing Acts

Disappearing Acts

Spectacles of Gender and Nationalism in Argentina's "dirty War"

  • Author: Diana Taylor
  • Publisher: Duke University Press
  • ISBN: 9780822318682
  • Category: History
  • Page: 309
  • View: 6604
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In Disappearing Acts, Diana Taylor looks at how national identity is shaped, gendered, and contested through spectacle and spectatorship. The specific identity in question is that of Argentina, and Taylor’s focus is directed toward the years 1976 to 1983 in which the Argentine armed forces were pitted against the Argentine people in that nation’s "Dirty War." Combining feminism, cultural studies, and performance theory, Taylor analyzes the political spectacles that comprised the war—concentration camps, torture, "disappearances"—as well as the rise of theatrical productions, demonstrations, and other performative practices that attempted to resist and subvert the Argentine military. Taylor uses performance theory to explore how public spectacle both builds and dismantles a sense of national and gender identity. Here, nation is understood as a product of communal "imaginings" that are rehearsed, written, and staged—and spectacle is the desiring machine at work in those imaginings. Taylor argues that the founding scenario of Argentineness stages the struggle for national identity as a battle between men—fought on, over, and through the feminine body of the Motherland. She shows how the military’s representations of itself as the model of national authenticity established the parameters of the conflict in the 70s and 80s, feminized the enemy, and positioned the public—limiting its ability to respond. Those who challenged the dictatorship, from the Mothers of the Plaza de Mayo to progressive theater practitioners, found themselves in what Taylor describes as "bad scripts." Describing the images, myths, performances, and explanatory narratives that have informed Argentina’s national drama, Disappearing Acts offers a telling analysis of the aesthetics of violence and the disappearance of civil society during Argentina’s spectacle of terror.

Ideologies of Forgetting

Ideologies of Forgetting

Rape in the Vietnam War

  • Author: Gina Marie Weaver
  • Publisher: SUNY Press
  • ISBN: 1438430000
  • Category: Social Science
  • Page: 216
  • View: 6280
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First book to study rape and sexual abuse of Vietnamese women by U.S. soldiers during the Vietnam War.

Bodies of War

Bodies of War

World War I and the Politics of Commemoration in America, 1919-1933

  • Author: Lisa M. Budreau
  • Publisher: NYU Press
  • ISBN: 0814791468
  • Category: History
  • Page: 336
  • View: 2282
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The United States lost thousands of troops during World War I, and the government gave next-of-kin a choice about what to do with their fallen loved ones: ship them home for burial or leave them permanently in Europe, in makeshift graves that would be eventually transformed into cemeteries in France, Belgium, and England. World War I marked the first war in which the United States government and military took full responsibility for the identification, burial, and memorialization of those killed in battle, and as a result, the process of burying and remembering the dead became intensely political. The government and military attempted to create a patriotic consensus on the historical memory of World War I in which war dead were not only honored but used as a symbol to legitimize America’s participation in a war not fully supported by all citizens. The saga of American soldiers killed in World War I and the efforts of the living to honor them is a neglected component of United States military history, and in this fascinating yet often macabre account, Lisa M. Budreau unpacks the politics and processes of the competing interest groups involved in the three core components of commemoration: repatriation, remembrance, and return. She also describes how relatives of the fallen made pilgrimages to French battlefields, attended largely by American Legionnaires and the Gold Star Mothers, a group formed by mothers of sons killed in World War I, which exists to this day. Throughout, and with sensitivity to issues of race and gender, Bodies of War emphasizes the inherent tensions in the politics of memorialization and explores how those interests often conflicted with the needs of veterans and relatives.

Civil War Time

Civil War Time

Temporality & Identity in America, 1861-1865

  • Author: Cheryl A. Wells
  • Publisher: University of Georgia Press
  • ISBN: 9780820326573
  • Category: History
  • Page: 195
  • View: 3806
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Focusing on the US Civil War, Cheryl Wells looks at how it played havoc with people's perception and use of time, including interrupted periods of sleep, indefinite prison sentences and extended hours of work. Wells calls this 'battle time' and she looks at its effects on civilians, as well as those involved in the fighting itself.