Search Results for "disease-in-the-history-of-modern-latin-america"

Disease in the History of Modern Latin America

Disease in the History of Modern Latin America

From Malaria to AIDS

  • Author: Diego Armus
  • Publisher: Duke University Press
  • ISBN: 0822384345
  • Category: Medical
  • Page: 335
  • View: 8781
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Challenging traditional approaches to medical history, Disease in the History of Modern Latin America advances understandings of disease as a social and cultural construction in Latin America. This innovative collection provides a vivid look at the latest research in the cultural history of medicine through insightful essays about how disease—whether it be cholera or aids, leprosy or mental illness—was experienced and managed in different Latin American countries and regions, at different times from the late nineteenth century to the present. Based on the idea that the meanings of sickness—and health—are contestable and subject to controversy, Disease in the History of Modern Latin America displays the richness of an interdisciplinary approach to social and cultural history. Examining diseases in Mexico, Brazil, Argentina, Colombia, Peru, and Bolivia, the contributors explore the production of scientific knowledge, literary metaphors for illness, domestic public health efforts, and initiatives shaped by the agendas of international agencies. They also analyze the connections between ideas of sexuality, disease, nation, and modernity; the instrumental role of certain illnesses in state-building processes; welfare efforts sponsored by the state and led by the medical professions; and the boundaries between individual and state responsibilities regarding sickness and health. Diego Armus’s introduction contextualizes the essays within the history of medicine, the history of public health, and the sociocultural history of disease. Contributors. Diego Armus, Anne-Emanuelle Birn, Kathleen Elaine Bliss, Ann S. Blum, Marilia Coutinho, Marcus Cueto, Patrick Larvie, Gabriela Nouzeilles, Diana Obregón, Nancy Lays Stepan, Ann Zulawski

Disease in the History of Modern Latin America

Disease in the History of Modern Latin America

From Malaria to AIDS

  • Author: Diego Armus
  • Publisher: Duke University Press
  • ISBN: 9780822330691
  • Category: History
  • Page: 326
  • View: 4243
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DIVEdited volume that takes a non-traditional approach to the history of medicine in Latin America, and emphasizes the cultural and social construction of disease./div

The Ailing City

The Ailing City

Health, Tuberculosis, and Culture in Buenos Aires, 1870–1950

  • Author: Diego Armus
  • Publisher: Duke University Press
  • ISBN: 0822350122
  • Category: History
  • Page: 416
  • View: 9025
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DIVThe first comprehensive study of tuberculosis in Latin America demonstrates that in addition to being a biological phenomenon disease is also a social construction effected by rhetoric, politics, and the daily life of its victims./div

Man and Microbes

Man and Microbes

Disease and Plagues in History and Modern Times

  • Author: Arno Karlen
  • Publisher: Simon and Schuster
  • ISBN: 0684822709
  • Category: Medical
  • Page: 266
  • View: 2822
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A noted medical historian places recent outbreaks of deadly diseases in historical perspective, with accounts of other alarming and recurring diseases throughout history and of the ways in which humans have adapted. Reprint. 17,500 first printing.

Medicine and Public Health in Latin America

Medicine and Public Health in Latin America

  • Author: Marcos Cueto,Steven Palmer
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press
  • ISBN: 110702367X
  • Category: History
  • Page: 318
  • View: 2651
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This book provides a clear, broad, and provocative synthesis of the history of Latin American medicine.

Infectious Fear

Infectious Fear

Politics, Disease, and the Health Effects of Segregation

  • Author: Samuel Roberts
  • Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press
  • ISBN: 0807832596
  • Category: Medical
  • Page: 313
  • View: 8187
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For most of the first half of the twentieth century, tuberculosis ranked among the top three causes of mortality among urban African Americans. Often afflicting an entire family or large segments of a neighborhood, the plague of TB was as mysterious as it

A History of Latin America

A History of Latin America

  • Author: Benjamin Keen,Keith Haynes
  • Publisher: Cengage Learning
  • ISBN: 1133711367
  • Category: History
  • Page: 464
  • View: 7381
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This best-selling text for introductory Latin American history courses encompasses political and diplomatic theory, class structure and economic organization, culture and religion, and the environment. The integrating framework is the dependency theory, the most popular interpretation of Latin American history, which stresses the economic relationship of Latin American nations to wealthier nations, particularly the United States. Spanning pre-historic times to the present, A HISTORY OF LATIN AMERICA takes both a chronological and a nation-by-nation approach, and includes the most recent historical analysis and the most up-to-date scholarship. The Ninth Edition includes expanded coverage of social and cultural history (including music) throughout and increased attention to women, indigenous cultures, and Afro-Latino people assures well balanced coverage of the region's diverse histories. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.

Born to Die

Born to Die

Disease and New World Conquest, 1492-1650

  • Author: Noble David Cook
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press
  • ISBN: 9780521627306
  • Category: History
  • Page: 248
  • View: 4514
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Cook explains that the conquest of the New World was achieved by a handful of Europeans - not by the sword, but by deadly disease.

The Oxford Handbook of Latin American History

The Oxford Handbook of Latin American History

  • Author: Jose C. Moya
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press
  • ISBN: 0195166213
  • Category: History
  • Page: 526
  • View: 905
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This Oxford Handbook comprehensively examines the field of Latin American history.

The Routledge History of Disease

The Routledge History of Disease

  • Author: Mark Jackson
  • Publisher: Routledge
  • ISBN: 113485787X
  • Category: History
  • Page: 618
  • View: 1844
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The Routledge History of Disease draws on innovative scholarship in the history of medicine to explore the challenges involved in writing about health and disease throughout the past and across the globe, presenting a varied range of case studies and perspectives on the patterns, technologies and narratives of disease that can be identified in the past and that continue to influence our present. Organized thematically, chapters examine particular forms and conceptualizations of disease, covering subjects from leprosy in medieval Europe and cancer screening practices in twentieth-century USA to the ayurvedic tradition in ancient India and the pioneering studies of mental illness that took place in nineteenth-century Paris, as well as discussing the various sources and methods that can be used to understand the social and cultural contexts of disease. The book is divided into four sections, focusing in turn on historical models of disease, shifting temporal and geographical patterns of disease, the impact of new technologies on categorizing, diagnosing and treating disease, and the different ways in which patients and practitioners, as well as novelists and playwrights, have made sense of their experiences of disease in the past. International in scope, chronologically wide-ranging and illustrated with images and maps, this comprehensive volume is essential reading for anyone interested in the history of health through the ages.

A Disease in the Public Mind

A Disease in the Public Mind

A New Understanding of why We Fought the Civil War

  • Author: Thomas J. Fleming
  • Publisher: Da Capo Press
  • ISBN: 0306821265
  • Category: History
  • Page: 354
  • View: 9451
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A historian explores the possibility that the Civil War started not because of slavery, but because the South was chosen to house the nation's leadership instead of in Northern New England where the Revolution had begun. 35,000 first printing.

Plagues and the Paradox of Progress

Plagues and the Paradox of Progress

Why the World Is Getting Healthier in Worrisome Ways

  • Author: Thomas J. Bollyky
  • Publisher: MIT Press
  • ISBN: 0262038455
  • Category: Medical
  • Page: 280
  • View: 8739
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Why the news about the global decline of infectious diseases is not all good. Plagues and parasites have played a central role in world affairs, shaping the evolution of the modern state, the growth of cities, and the disparate fortunes of national economies. This book tells that story, but it is not about the resurgence of pestilence. It is the story of its decline. For the first time in recorded history, virus, bacteria, and other infectious diseases are not the leading cause of death or disability in any region of the world. People are living longer, and fewer mothers are giving birth to many children in the hopes that some might survive. And yet, the news is not all good. Recent reductions in infectious disease have not been accompanied by the same improvements in income, job opportunities, and governance that occurred with these changes in wealthier countries decades ago. There have also been unintended consequences. In this book, Thomas Bollyky explores the paradox in our fight against infectious disease: the world is getting healthier in ways that should make us worry. Bollyky interweaves a grand historical narrative about the rise and fall of plagues in human societies with contemporary case studies of the consequences. Bollyky visits Dhaka—one of the most densely populated places on the planet—to show how low-cost health tools helped enable the phenomenon of poor world megacities. He visits China and Kenya to illustrate how dramatic declines in plagues have affected national economies. Bollyky traces the role of infectious disease in the migrations from Ireland before the potato famine and to Europe from Africa and elsewhere today. Historic health achievements are remaking a world that is both worrisome and full of opportunities. Whether the peril or promise of that progress prevails, Bollyky explains, depends on what we do next. A Council on Foreign Relations Book

The Oxford Handbook of Latin American History

The Oxford Handbook of Latin American History

  • Author: Jose C. Moya
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press
  • ISBN: 0195166213
  • Category: History
  • Page: 526
  • View: 4288
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This Oxford Handbook comprehensively examines the field of Latin American history.

Latin America in the Modern World

Latin America in the Modern World

  • Author: Virginia Garrard,Peter V. N. Henderson,Bryan McCann
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
  • ISBN: 9780199340224
  • Category: History
  • Page: 784
  • View: 9159
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Latin America in the Modern World covers all regions of Latin America and is the first text to situate modern Latin American history in a global context. While providing in-depth coverage of the history of the three largest Latin American countries - Mexico, Brazil, and Argentina - this textalso offers case studies from almost all of the countries and clearly identifies themes, topics, people, and intellectual currents that help to knit the history of modern Latin America into a coherent category of study.

Banana Cultures

Banana Cultures

Agriculture, Consumption, and Environmental Change in Honduras and the United States

  • Author: John Soluri
  • Publisher: University of Texas Press
  • ISBN: 0292777876
  • Category: History
  • Page: 336
  • View: 3602
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Bananas, the most frequently consumed fresh fruit in the United States, have been linked to Miss Chiquita and Carmen Miranda, "banana republics," and Banana Republic clothing stores—everything from exotic kitsch, to Third World dictatorships, to middle-class fashion. But how did the rise in banana consumption in the United States affect the banana-growing regions of Central America? In this lively, interdisciplinary study, John Soluri integrates agroecology, anthropology, political economy, and history to trace the symbiotic growth of the export banana industry in Honduras and the consumer mass market in the United States. Beginning in the 1870s when bananas first appeared in the U.S. marketplace, Soluri examines the tensions between the small-scale growers, who dominated the trade in the early years, and the shippers. He then shows how rising demand led to changes in production that resulted in the formation of major agribusinesses, spawned international migrations, and transformed great swaths of the Honduran environment into monocultures susceptible to plant disease epidemics that in turn changed Central American livelihoods. Soluri also looks at labor practices and workers' lives, changing gender roles on the banana plantations, the effects of pesticides on the Honduran environment and people, and the mass marketing of bananas to consumers in the United States. His multifaceted account of a century of banana production and consumption adds an important chapter to the history of Honduras, as well as to the larger history of globalization and its effects on rural peoples, local economies, and biodiversity.

Pathologies of Power

Pathologies of Power

Health, Human Rights, and the New War on the Poor

  • Author: Paul Farmer
  • Publisher: Univ of California Press
  • ISBN: 0520243269
  • Category: History
  • Page: 402
  • View: 8215
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"Pathologies of Power" uses harrowing stories of life and death to argue thatthe promotion of social and economic rights of the poor is the most importanthuman rights struggle of our times.

The Return of Epidemics

The Return of Epidemics

Health and Society in Peru During the Twentieth Century

  • Author: Professor Marcos Cueto
  • Publisher: Taylor & Francis
  • ISBN: 1351882899
  • Category:
  • Page: N.A
  • View: 7481
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Historians have long recognized epidemics to be a significant, though sometimes hidden, factor in the fortunes of societies and civilizations. The study of epidemics heightens our understanding of relationships between economic systems and living conditions. It illuminates the ideologies and religious beliefs of the affected community and illustrates the efforts and inadequacies of public health systems. This investigation of the history of epidemics in various parts of Peru during the twentieth century opens up a new field for Latin American studies to include health and disease. These are important areas of the past that enable us to understand better the living conditions of people, the role of state authority and the dynamics of social movement. Marcos Cueto examines five series of epidemics: the bubonic plague of 1903-1930; the fever epidemic of 1919-1922; the typhus and small pox epidemics in the Andes; attempts to control and eradicate malaria, and the cholera epidemics of 1991. In each case he studies the biological and ecological factors that caused the outbreak, and the techniques and policies applied to fight it, together with the response of the affected society. The experience of epidemics in Peru has been cyclical. Poverty breeds disease which in turn results in further poverty. One of the aims of this study is to highlight areas of success and failure in the fight against epidemics in the hope that such awareness may help break this vicious circle.

Plagues and Peoples

Plagues and Peoples

  • Author: William McNeill
  • Publisher: Anchor
  • ISBN: 0307773663
  • Category: Social Science
  • Page: 368
  • View: 5448
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Upon its original publication, Plagues and Peoples was an immediate critical and popular success, offering a radically new interpretation of world history as seen through the extraordinary impact--political, demographic, ecological, and psychological--of disease on cultures. From the conquest of Mexico by smallpox as much as by the Spanish, to the bubonic plague in China, to the typhoid epidemic in Europe, the history of disease is the history of humankind. With the identification of AIDS in the early 1980s, another chapter has been added to this chronicle of events, which William McNeill explores in his new introduction to this updated editon. Thought-provoking, well-researched, and compulsively readable, Plagues and Peoples is that rare book that is as fascinating as it is scholarly, as intriguing as it is enlightening. "A brilliantly conceptualized and challenging achievement" (Kirkus Reviews), it is essential reading, offering a new perspective on human history.

The Experiential Caribbean

The Experiential Caribbean

Creating Knowledge and Healing in the Early Modern Atlantic

  • Author: Pablo F. Gómez
  • Publisher: UNC Press Books
  • ISBN: 1469630885
  • Category: History
  • Page: 314
  • View: 9380
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Opening a window on a dynamic realm far beyond imperial courts, anatomical theaters, and learned societies, Pablo F. Gomez examines the strategies that Caribbean people used to create authoritative, experientially based knowledge about the human body and the natural world during the long seventeenth century. Gomez treats the early modern intellectual culture of these mostly black and free Caribbean communities on its own merits and not only as it relates to well-known frameworks for the study of science and medicine. Drawing on an array of governmental and ecclesiastical sources—notably Inquisition records—Gomez highlights more than one hundred black ritual practitioners regarded as masters of healing practices and as social and spiritual leaders. He shows how they developed evidence-based healing principles based on sensorial experience rather than on dogma. He elucidates how they nourished ideas about the universality of human bodies, which contributed to the rise of empirical testing of disease origins and cures. Both colonial authorities and Caribbean people of all conditions viewed this experiential knowledge as powerful and competitive. In some ways, it served to respond to the ills of slavery. Even more crucial, however, it demonstrates how the black Atlantic helped creatively to fashion the early modern world.

American Trypanosomiasis Chagas Disease

American Trypanosomiasis Chagas Disease

One Hundred Years of Research

  • Author: Jenny Telleria,Michel Tibayrenc
  • Publisher: Elsevier
  • ISBN: 012801069X
  • Category: Medical
  • Page: 844
  • View: 7461
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American Trypanosomiasis, Chagas Disease: One Hundred Years of Research, Second Edition, provides a comprehensive overview of Chagas disease and discusses the latest discoveries concerning the three elements that compose the transmission chain of the disease, the host, the insect vectors, and the causative parasite. In addition, new insights on the molecular biology and diagnostics of Chagas diseases, the persistence of infections in the host, and the interaction of the parasite and host metabolism are now included in this new and updated edition. Provides a thoroughly revised, updated, and streamlined new edition with contributions from leading authorities and industry experts Informs and updates on all the latest developments of Chagas disease, covering biology, clinical aspects, and human sciences Includes a summarizing chapter that provides key insights of practical significance for prevention efforts