Search Results for "doing-empirical-political-research"

Doing Empirical Political Research

Doing Empirical Political Research

  • Author: James M. Carlson,Mark S. Hyde
  • Publisher: Houghton Mifflin College Division
  • ISBN: 9780618116720
  • Category: Political Science
  • Page: 436
  • View: 2046
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This text emphasizes active learning through the use of real data and a hands-on approach to SPSS. By placing coverage of the philosophy of science and the building blocks of research at the beginning, the structure of the text follows the actual process students would employ in their own research. Activities and exercises help students master research concepts and skills.

Empirical Research and Writing

Empirical Research and Writing

A Political Science Student’s Practical Guide

  • Author: Leanne C. Powner
  • Publisher: CQ Press
  • ISBN: 1483370666
  • Category: Political Science
  • Page: 320
  • View: 8928
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Students can easily misstep when they first begin to do research. Leanne C. Powner’s new title Empirical Research and Writing: A Student's Practical Guide provides valuable advice and guidance on conducting and writing about empirical research. Chapter by chapter, students are guided through the key steps in the research process. Written in a lively and engaging manner and with a dose of humor, this practical text shows students exactly how to choose a research topic, conduct a literature review, make research design decisions, collect and analyze data, and then write up and present the results. The book's approachable style and just-in-time information delivery make it a text students will want to read, and its wide-ranging and surprisingly sophisticated coverage will make it an important resource for their later coursework.

Doing Research in Political Science

Doing Research in Political Science

An Introduction to Comparative Methods and Statistics

  • Author: Paul Pennings,Hans Keman,Jan Kleinnijenhuis
  • Publisher: SAGE
  • ISBN: 1446226905
  • Category: Political Science
  • Page: 336
  • View: 783
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This is an immensely helpful book for students starting their own research... an excellent introduction to the comparative method giving an authoritative overview over the research process - Klaus Armingeon, University of Bern Doing Research in Political Science is the book for mastering the comparative method in all the social sciences - Jan-Erik Lane, University of Geneva This book has established itself as a concise and well-readable text on comparative methods and statistics in political science I...strongly recommend it. - Dirk Berg-Schlosser, Philipps-University Marburg This thoroughly revised edition of the popular textbook offers an accessible but comprehensive introduction to comparative research methods and statistics for students of political science. Clearly organized around three parts, the text introduces the main theories and methodologies used in the discipline. Part 1 frames the comparative approach within the methodological framework of the political and social sciences. Part 2 introduces basic descriptive and inferential statistical methods as well as more advanced multivariate methods used in quantitative political analysis. Part 3 applies the methods and techniques of Parts 1 & 2 to research questions drawn from contemporary themes and issues in political science. Incorporating practice exercises, ideas for further reading and summary questions throughout, Doing Research in Political Science provides an invaluable step-by-step guide for students and researchers in political science, comparative politics and empirical political analysis.

Research Methods for Political Science

Research Methods for Political Science

Quantitative and Qualitative Methods

  • Author: David E McNabb
  • Publisher: Routledge
  • ISBN: 1317460979
  • Category: Business & Economics
  • Page: 448
  • View: 6834
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Thoroughly updated, more concise than the previous edition, and available for the first time in paperback, "Research Methods for Political Science" is designed to help students learn what to research, why to research, and how to research. The text integrates both quantitative and qualitative approaches to research in one volume, and includes the most comprehensive coverage of qualitative methods currently available. It covers such important topics as research design, specifying research problems, designing questionnaries and writing questions, designing and carrying out qualitative research, and analyzing both quantitative and qualitative research data. Heavily illustrated, classroom tested, and exceptionally readable and engaging, the text also provides specific instructions on the use of available statistical software programs such as Excel and SPSS.

Interview Research in Political Science

Interview Research in Political Science

  • Author: Layna Mosley
  • Publisher: Cornell University Press
  • ISBN: 0801467969
  • Category: Social Science
  • Page: 272
  • View: 5919
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Interviews are a frequent and important part of empirical research in political science, but graduate programs rarely offer discipline-specific training in selecting interviewees, conducting interviews, and using the data thus collected. Interview Research in Political Science addresses this vital need, offering hard-won advice for both graduate students and faculty members. The contributors to this book have worked in a variety of field locations and settings and have interviewed a wide array of informants, from government officials to members of rebel movements and victims of wartime violence, from lobbyists and corporate executives to workers and trade unionists. The authors encourage scholars from all subfields of political science to use interviews in their research, and they provide a set of lessons and tools for doing so. The book addresses how to construct a sample of interviewees; how to collect and report interview data; and how to address ethical considerations and the Institutional Review Board process. Other chapters discuss how to link interview-based evidence with causal claims; how to use proxy interviews or an interpreter to improve access; and how to structure interview questions. A useful appendix contains examples of consent documents, semistructured interview prompts, and interview protocols. Contributors: Frank R. Baumgartner, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Matthew N. Beckmann, University of California, Irvine; Jeffrey M. Berry, Tufts University; Erik Bleich, Middlebury College; Sarah M. Brooks, The Ohio State University; Melani Cammett, Brown University; Lee Ann Fujii, University of Toronto; Mary Gallagher, University of Michigan; Richard L. Hall, University of Michigan; Marie Hojnacki, Pennsylvania State University; David C. Kimball, University of Missouri, St. Louis; Beth L. Leech, Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey; Julia F. Lynch, University of Pennsylvania; Cathie Jo Martin, Boston University; Lauren Maclean, Indiana University; Layna Mosley, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Robert Pekkanen, University of Washington; William Reno, Northwestern University; Reuel R. Rogers, Northwestern University

Designing Social Inquiry

Designing Social Inquiry

Scientific Inference in Qualitative Research

  • Author: Gary King,Robert O. Keohane,Sidney Verba
  • Publisher: Princeton University Press
  • ISBN: 9781400821211
  • Category: Social Science
  • Page: 264
  • View: 5908
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While heated arguments between practitioners of qualitative and quantitative research have begun to test the very integrity of the social sciences, Gary King, Robert Keohane, and Sidney Verba have produced a farsighted and timely book that promises to sharpen and strengthen a wide range of research performed in this field. These leading scholars, each representing diverse academic traditions, have developed a unified approach to valid descriptive and causal inference in qualitative research, where numerical measurement is either impossible or undesirable. Their book demonstrates that the same logic of inference underlies both good quantitative and good qualitative research designs, and their approach applies equally to each. Providing precepts intended to stimulate and discipline thought, the authors explore issues related to framing research questions, measuring the accuracy of data and uncertainty of empirical inferences, discovering causal effects, and generally improving qualitative research. Among the specific topics they address are interpretation and inference, comparative case studies, constructing causal theories, dependent and explanatory variables, the limits of random selection, selection bias, and errors in measurement. Mathematical notation is occasionally used to clarify concepts, but no prior knowledge of mathematics or statistics is assumed. The unified logic of inference that this book explicates will be enormously useful to qualitative researchers of all traditions and substantive fields.

Thinking Like a Political Scientist

Thinking Like a Political Scientist

A Practical Guide to Research Methods

  • Author: Christopher Howard
  • Publisher: University of Chicago Press
  • ISBN: 022632768X
  • Category: Political Science
  • Page: 248
  • View: 6262
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Each year, tens of thousands of students who are interested in politics go through a rite of passage: they take a course in research methods. Many find the subject to be boring or confusing, and with good reason. Most of the standard books on research methods fail to highlight the most important concepts and questions. Instead, they brim with dry technical definitions and focus heavily on statistical analysis, slighting other valuable methods. This approach not only dulls potential enjoyment of the course, but prevents students from mastering the skills they need to engage more directly and meaningfully with a wide variety of research. With wit and practical wisdom, Christopher Howard draws on more than a decade of experience teaching research methods to transform a typically dreary subject and teach budding political scientists the critical skills they need to read published research more effectively and produce better research of their own. The first part of the book is devoted to asking three fundamental questions in political science: What happened? Why? Who cares? In the second section, Howard demonstrates how to answer these questions by choosing an appropriate research design, selecting cases, and working with numbers and written documents as evidence. Drawing on examples from American and comparative politics, international relations, and public policy, Thinking Like a Political Scientist highlights the most common challenges that political scientists routinely face, and each chapter concludes with exercises so that students can practice dealing with those challenges.

Political Research

Political Research

Methods and Practical Skills

  • Author: Sandra Halperin,Oliver Heath
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press
  • ISBN: 0199558418
  • Category: Political Science
  • Page: 440
  • View: 8114
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This new book has been designed to equip students of politics and international relations with the analytical skills and resources to evaluate, understand and criticise research findings in political research, as well as the practical skills to carry out their own research.

Political Science Research Methods

Political Science Research Methods

  • Author: Janet Buttolph Johnson,H. T. Reynolds,Jason D. Mycoff
  • Publisher: CQ Press
  • ISBN: 1506307841
  • Category: Political Science
  • Page: 656
  • View: 8793
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Understand the “how” and the “why” behind research in political science. Step by step, Political Science Research Methods walks students through the logic of research design, carefully explaining how researchers choose which method to employ. The Eighth Edition of this trusted resource offers a greater emphasis on the ways in which particular methods are used by undergraduates, expanded coverage of the role of the Internet in research and analysis, and more international examples. Practice makes perfect. In the new fourth edition of the accompanying workbook, Working with Political Science Research Methods, students are given the perfect opportunity to practice each of the methods presented in the core text. This helpful supplement breaks each aspect of the research process into manageable parts and features new exercises and updated data sets. A solutions manual with answers to the workbook is available to adopters.

Understanding Political Science Research Methods

Understanding Political Science Research Methods

The Challenge of Inference

  • Author: Maryann Barakso,Daniel M. Sabet,Brian Schaffner
  • Publisher: Routledge
  • ISBN: 1136622381
  • Category: Political Science
  • Page: 250
  • View: 2197
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This text starts by explaining the fundamental goal of good political science research—the ability to answer interesting and important questions by generating valid inferences about political phenomena. Before the text even discusses the process of developing a research question, the authors introduce the reader to what it means to make an inference and the different challenges that social scientists face when confronting this task. Only with this ultimate goal in mind will students be able to ask appropriate questions, conduct fruitful literature reviews, select and execute the proper research design, and critically evaluate the work of others. The authors' primary goal is to teach students to critically evaluate their own research designs and others’ and analyze the extent to which they overcome the classic challenges to making inference: internal and external validity concerns, omitted variable bias, endogeneity, measurement, sampling, and case selection errors, and poor research questions or theory. As such, students will not only be better able to conduct political science research, but they will also be more savvy consumers of the constant flow of causal assertions that they confront in scholarship, in the media, and in conversations with others. Three themes run through Barakso, Sabet, and Schaffner’s text: minimizing classic research problems to making valid inferences, effective presentation of research results, and the nonlinear nature of the research process. Throughout their academic years and later in their professional careers, students will need to effectively convey various bits of information. Presentation skills gleaned from this text will benefit students for a lifetime, whether they continue in academia or in a professional career. Several distinctive features make this book noteworthy: A common set of examples threaded throughout the text give students a common ground across chapters and expose them to a broad range of subfields in the discipline. Box features throughout the book illustrate the nonlinear, "non-textbook" reality of research, demonstrate the often false inferences and poor social science in the way the popular press covers politics, and encourage students to think about ethical issues at various stages of the research process.

Conducting Empirical Analysis

Conducting Empirical Analysis

Public Opinion in Action

  • Author: Rosalee A. Clawson,Zoe M. Oxley
  • Publisher: SAGE
  • ISBN: 1483305155
  • Category: Political Science
  • Page: 192
  • View: 1020
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Conducting Empirical Analysis is an ideal way to marry substance with skills, getting students to experience the joy of discovery firsthand. Through straightforward instruction and guided examples, Clawson and Oxley show students how to conduct web-based data analysis using UC Berkeley’s Survey Documentation and Analysis (available online for free) to answer questions about party identification or attitude stability, and to measure racial prejudice and political knowledge. Exercises cover a range of data collection techniques, survey research, and statistical analyses, ramping up from multiple-choice and open-ended questions to mini-research projects. An instructor’s guide with solutions is available for adopters.

The Relevance of Political Science

The Relevance of Political Science

  • Author: Gerry Stoker,B. Guy Peters,Jon Pierre
  • Publisher: Macmillan International Higher Education
  • ISBN: 1137506601
  • Category: Political Science
  • Page: 296
  • View: 2986
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What does political science tell us about important real-world problems and issues? And to what extent does and can political analysis contribute to solutions? This is the challenge addressed by leading political scientists in this original text which will be essential reading for students and scholars alike.

Post-Foundational Discourse Analysis

Post-Foundational Discourse Analysis

From Political Difference to Empirical Research

  • Author: Tomas Marttila
  • Publisher: Springer
  • ISBN: 1137538406
  • Category: Language Arts & Disciplines
  • Page: 238
  • View: 6273
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This book adds the missing link between post-foundational discourse theory and the methods of empirical research, and in doing so it develops a post-foundational discourse analysis research program. The book offers a structure of the research program, and explores the methodologization of other discourse analytical approaches.

The Oxford Handbook of Empirical Legal Research

The Oxford Handbook of Empirical Legal Research

  • Author: Peter Cane,Herbert Kritzer
  • Publisher: OUP Oxford
  • ISBN: 019163543X
  • Category: Law
  • Page: 1112
  • View: 4971
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The empirical study of law, legal systems and legal institutions is widely viewed as one of the most exciting and important intellectual developments in the modern history of legal research. Motivated by a conviction that legal phenomena can and should be understood not only in normative terms but also as social practices of political, economic and ethical significance, empirical legal researchers have used quantitative and qualitative methods to illuminate many aspects of law's meaning, operation and impact. In the 43 chapters of The Oxford Handbook of Empirical Legal Research leading scholars provide accessible and original discussions of the history, aims and methods of empirical research about law, as well as its achievements and potential. The Handbook has three parts. The first deals with the development and institutional context of empirical legal research. The second - and largest - part consists of critical accounts of empirical research on many aspects of the legal world - on criminal law, civil law, public law, regulatory law and international law; on lawyers, judicial institutions, legal procedures and evidence; and on legal pluralism and the public understanding of law. The third part introduces readers to the methods of empirical research, and its place in the law school curriculum.

The Fundamentals of Political Science Research

The Fundamentals of Political Science Research

  • Author: Paul M. Kellstedt,Guy D. Whitten
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press
  • ISBN: 1107245273
  • Category: Political Science
  • Page: N.A
  • View: 3417
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The Fundamentals of Political Science Research provides an introduction to the scientific study of politics. It offers the basic tools necessary for readers to become both critical consumers and beginning producers of scientific research on politics. Professors Kellstedt and Whitten present an integrated approach to research design and empirical analyses in which researchers can develop and test causal theories. The authors use examples from political science research that students will find interesting and inspiring, and that will help them understand key concepts. The book makes technical material accessible to students who might otherwise be intimidated by mathematical examples. This revised second edition refines discussions from the first edition, with a new chapter on how to write an original research project. The second edition also contains an additional forty exercises and adds definitions for terms discussed in each chapter.

Empirical Legal Research

Empirical Legal Research

A Guidance Book for Lawyers, Legislators and Regulators

  • Author: Frans L. Leeuw,Hans Schmeets
  • Publisher: Edward Elgar Publishing
  • ISBN: 1782549412
  • Category: Law
  • Page: 320
  • View: 8418
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Empirical Legal Research describes how to investigate the roles of legislation, regulation, legal policies and other legal arrangements at play in society. It is invaluable as a guide to legal scholars, practitioners and students on how to do empirical legal research, covering history, methods, evidence, growth of knowledge and links with normativity. This multidisciplinary approach combines insights and approaches from different social sciences, evaluation studies, Big Data analytics and empirically informed ethics. The authors present an overview of the roots of this blossoming interdisciplinary domain, going back to legal realism, the fields of law, economics and the social sciences, and also to civilology and evaluation studies. The book addresses not only data analysis and statistics, but also how to formulate adequate research problems, to use (and test) different types of theories (explanatory and intervention theories) and to apply new forms of literature research to the field of law such as the systematic, rapid and realist reviews and synthesis studies. The choice and architecture of research designs, the collection of data, including Big Data, and how to analyze and visualize data are also covered. The book discusses the tensions between the normative character of law and legal issues and the descriptive and causal character of empirical legal research, and suggests ways to help handle this seeming disconnect. This comprehensive guide is vital reading for law practitioners as well as for students and researchers dealing with regulation, legislation and other legal arrangements.

Experimental Political Science and the Study of Causality

Experimental Political Science and the Study of Causality

From Nature to the Lab

  • Author: Rebecca B. Morton,Kenneth C. Williams
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press
  • ISBN: 1139490532
  • Category: Political Science
  • Page: N.A
  • View: 9875
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Increasingly, political scientists use the term 'experiment' or 'experimental' to describe their empirical research. One of the primary reasons for doing so is the advantage of experiments in establishing causal inferences. In this book, Rebecca B. Morton and Kenneth C. Williams discuss in detail how experiments and experimental reasoning with observational data can help researchers determine causality. They explore how control and random assignment mechanisms work, examining both the Rubin causal model and the formal theory approaches to causality. They also cover general topics in experimentation such as the history of experimentation in political science; internal and external validity of experimental research; types of experiments - field, laboratory, virtual, and survey - and how to choose, recruit, and motivate subjects in experiments. They investigate ethical issues in experimentation, the process of securing approval from institutional review boards for human subject research, and the use of deception in experimentation.

Case Studies and Theory Development in the Social Sciences

Case Studies and Theory Development in the Social Sciences

  • Author: Alexander L. George,Andrew Bennett
  • Publisher: MIT Press
  • ISBN: 9780262572224
  • Category: Political Science
  • Page: 331
  • View: 7773
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A text that emphasizes the importance of case studies in social science scholarship and shows how to make case study practices more rigorous.

Field Experiments in Political Science and Public Policy

Field Experiments in Political Science and Public Policy

Practical Lessons in Design and Delivery

  • Author: Peter John
  • Publisher: Taylor & Francis
  • ISBN: 1317680189
  • Category: Political Science
  • Page: 208
  • View: 6061
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Field experiments -- randomized controlled trials -- have become ever more popular in political science, as well as in other disciplines, such as economics, social policy and development. Policy-makers have also increasingly used randomization to evaluate public policies, designing trials of tax reminders, welfare policies and international aid programs to name just a few of the interventions tested in this way. Field experiments have become successful because they assess causal claims in ways that other methods of evaluation find hard to emulate. Social scientists and evaluators have rediscovered how to design and analyze field experiments, but they have paid much less attention to the challenges of organizing and managing them. Field experiments pose unique challenges and opportunities for the researcher and evaluator which come from working in the field. The research experience can be challenging and at times hard to predict. This book aims to help researchers and evaluators plan and manage their field experiments so they can avoid common pitfalls. It is also intended to open up discussion about the context and backdrop to trials so that these practical aspects of field experiments are better understood. The book sets out ten steps researchers can use to plan their field experiments, then nine threats to watch out for when they implement them. There are cases studies of voting and political participation, elites, welfare and employment, nudging citizens, and developing countries.

Are Judges Political?

Are Judges Political?

An Empirical Analysis of the Federal Judiciary

  • Author: Cass R. Sunstein,David Schkade,Lisa M. Ellman,Andres Sawicki
  • Publisher: Brookings Institution Press
  • ISBN: 9780815782353
  • Category: Political Science
  • Page: 177
  • View: 6130
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Over the past two decades, the United States has seen an intense debate about the composition of the federal judiciary. Are judges "activists"? Should they stop "legislating from the bench"? Are they abusing their authority? Or are they protecting fundamental rights, in a way that is indispensable in a free society? Are Judges Political? cuts through the noise by looking at what judges actually do. Drawing on a unique data set consisting of thousands of judicial votes, Cass Sunstein and his colleagues analyze the influence of ideology on judicial voting, principally in the courts of appeal. They focus on two questions: Do judges appointed by Republican Presidents vote differently from Democratic appointees in ideologically contested cases? And do judges vote differently depending on the ideological leanings of the other judges hearing the same case? After examining votes on a broad range of issues--including abortion, affirmative action, and capital punishment--the authors do more than just confirm that Democratic and Republican appointees often vote in different ways. They inject precision into an all-too-often impressionistic debate by quantifying this effect and analyzing the conditions under which it holds. This approach sometimes generates surprising results: under certain conditions, for example, Democrat-appointed judges turn out to have more conservative voting patterns than Republican appointees. As a general rule, ideology should not and does not affect legal judgments. Frequently, the law is clear and judges simply implement it, whatever their political commitments. But what happens when the law is unclear? Are Judges Political? addresses this vital question.