Search Results for "empire-s-workshop"

Empire's Workshop

Empire's Workshop

Latin America, the United States, and the Rise of the New Imperialism

  • Author: Greg Grandin
  • Publisher: Macmillan
  • ISBN: 9780805077384
  • Category: History
  • Page: 286
  • View: 5877
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Provides a thought-provoking study of the role of Latin America as a proving ground for American imperial strategies and tactics, from Thomas Jefferson's campaign in Cuba and Spanish Florida to Reagan's support for oppresive, U.S.-friendly regimes in Central America. 25,000 first printing.

Empire's Workshop

Empire's Workshop

Latin America, the United States, and the Rise of the New Imperialism

  • Author: Greg Grandin
  • Publisher: Metropolitan Books
  • ISBN: 9781429959155
  • Category: History
  • Page: 304
  • View: 1758
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An eye-opening examination of Latin America's role as proving ground for U.S. imperial strategies and tactics In recent years, one book after another has sought to take the measure of the Bush administration's aggressive foreign policy. In their search for precedents, they invoke the Roman and British empires as well as postwar reconstructions of Germany and Japan. Yet they consistently ignore the one place where the United States had its most formative imperial experience: Latin America. A brilliant excavation of a long-obscured history, Empire's Workshop is the first book to show how Latin America has functioned as a laboratory for American extraterritorial rule. Historian Greg Grandin follows the United States' imperial operations, from Thomas Jefferson's aspirations for an "empire of liberty" in Cuba and Spanish Florida, to Ronald Reagan's support for brutally oppressive but U.S.-friendly regimes in Central America. He traces the origins of Bush's policies to Latin America, where many of the administration's leading lights—John Negroponte, Elliott Abrams, Otto Reich—first embraced the deployment of military power to advance free-market economics and first enlisted the evangelical movement in support of their ventures. With much of Latin America now in open rebellion against U.S. domination, Grandin concludes with a vital question: If Washington has failed to bring prosperity and democracy to Latin America—its own backyard "workshop"—what are the chances it will do so for the world?

Fordlandia

Fordlandia

The Rise and Fall of Henry Ford's Forgotten Jungle City

  • Author: Greg Grandin
  • Publisher: Metropolitan Books
  • ISBN: 9781429938013
  • Category: History
  • Page: 432
  • View: 7491
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The stunning, never before told story of the quixotic attempt to recreate small-town America in the heart of the Amazon In 1927, Henry Ford, the richest man in the world, bought a tract of land twice the size of Delaware in the Brazilian Amazon. His intention was to grow rubber, but the project rapidly evolved into a more ambitious bid to export America itself, along with its golf courses, ice-cream shops, bandstands, indoor plumbing, and Model Ts rolling down broad streets. Fordlandia, as the settlement was called, quickly became the site of an epic clash. On one side was the car magnate, lean, austere, the man who reduced industrial production to its simplest motions; on the other, the Amazon, lush, extravagant, the most complex ecological system on the planet. Ford's early success in imposing time clocks and square dances on the jungle soon collapsed, as indigenous workers, rejecting his midwestern Puritanism, turned the place into a ribald tropical boomtown. Fordlandia's eventual demise as a rubber plantation foreshadowed the practices that today are laying waste to the rain forest. More than a parable of one man's arrogant attempt to force his will on the natural world, Fordlandia depicts a desperate quest to salvage the bygone America that the Ford factory system did much to dispatch. As Greg Grandin shows in this gripping and mordantly observed history, Ford's great delusion was not that the Amazon could be tamed but that the forces of capitalism, once released, might yet be contained. Fordlandia is a 2009 National Book Award Finalist for Nonfiction.

The Empire of Necessity

The Empire of Necessity

Slavery, Freedom, and Deception in the New World

  • Author: Greg Grandin
  • Publisher: Metropolitan Books
  • ISBN: 1429943173
  • Category: History
  • Page: 384
  • View: 1768
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From the acclaimed author of Fordlandia, the story of a remarkable slave rebellion that illuminates America's struggle with slavery and freedom during the Age of Revolution and beyond One morning in 1805, off a remote island in the South Pacific, Captain Amasa Delano, a New England seal hunter, climbed aboard a distressed Spanish ship carrying scores of West Africans he thought were slaves. They weren't. Having earlier seized control of the vessel and slaughtered most of the crew, they were staging an elaborate ruse, acting as if they were humble servants. When Delano, an idealistic, anti-slavery republican, finally realized the deception, he responded with explosive violence. Drawing on research on four continents, The Empire of Necessity explores the multiple forces that culminated in this extraordinary event—an event that already inspired Herman Melville's masterpiece Benito Cereno. Now historian Greg Grandin, with the gripping storytelling that was praised in Fordlandia, uses the dramatic happenings of that day to map a new transnational history of slavery in the Americas, capturing the clash of peoples, economies, and faiths that was the New World in the early 1800s.

A Century of Revolution

A Century of Revolution

Insurgent and Counterinsurgent Violence during Latin America’s Long Cold War

  • Author: Gilbert M. Joseph,Greg Grandin
  • Publisher: Duke University Press
  • ISBN: 0822392852
  • Category: History
  • Page: 456
  • View: 1756
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Latin America experienced an epochal cycle of revolutionary upheavals and insurgencies during the twentieth century, from the Mexican Revolution of 1910 through the mobilizations and terror in Central America, the Southern Cone, and the Andes during the 1970s and 1980s. In his introduction to A Century of Revolution, Greg Grandin argues that the dynamics of political violence and terror in Latin America are so recognizable in their enforcement of domination, their generation and maintenance of social exclusion, and their propulsion of historical change, that historians have tended to take them for granted, leaving unexamined important questions regarding their form and meaning. The essays in this groundbreaking collection take up these questions, providing a sociologically and historically nuanced view of the ideological hardening and accelerated polarization that marked Latin America’s twentieth century. Attentive to the interplay among overlapping local, regional, national, and international fields of power, the contributors focus on the dialectical relations between revolutionary and counterrevolutionary processes and their unfolding in the context of U.S. hemispheric and global hegemony. Through their fine-grained analyses of events in Chile, Colombia, Cuba, El Salvador, Guatemala, Mexico, Nicaragua, and Peru, they suggest a framework for interpreting the experiential nature of political violence while also analyzing its historical causes and consequences. In so doing, they set a new agenda for the study of revolutionary change and political violence in twentieth-century Latin America. Contributors Michelle Chase Jeffrey L. Gould Greg Grandin Lillian Guerra Forrest Hylton Gilbert M. Joseph Friedrich Katz Thomas Miller Klubock Neil Larsen Arno J. Mayer Carlota McAllister Jocelyn Olcott Gerardo Rénique Corey Robin Peter Winn

Forgotten Continent

Forgotten Continent

The Battle for Latin America's Soul

  • Author: Michael Reid
  • Publisher: Yale University Press
  • ISBN: 0300145268
  • Category: Business & Economics
  • Page: 401
  • View: 8156
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Latin America has often been condemned to failure. Not as poor as Africa, nor as booming as India and China, it has largely been overlooked. Yet this vast continent, home to half a billion people, the world's largest reserves of arable land, and 8.5 percent of global oil, is transforming its political and economic landscape. This book argues that Latin America's efforts to build fairer and more prosperous societies make it one of the world's most vigorous laboratories for capitalist democracy. In many countries--including Brazil, Chile and Mexico--democratic leaders are laying the foundations for faster economic growth and more inclusive politics, as well as tackling deep-rooted problems. Failure will increase the flow of drugs and illegal immigrants to the United States and Europe, jeopardize stability in a region rich in strategic commodities, and threaten some of the world's most majestic natural environments.--From publisher description.

Who Is Rigoberta Menchu?

Who Is Rigoberta Menchu?

  • Author: Greg Grandin
  • Publisher: Verso Books
  • ISBN: 1844674584
  • Category: History
  • Page: 159
  • View: 8142
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In 1984, Nobel Peace Prize–winner and indigenous rights activist RigobertaMenchú published I, RigobertaMenchú, her autobiographical account of life in Guatemala undera military dictatorship to great acclaim. The book rapidly transformedthe study and understanding of modern Guatemalan history. Since then,her memoir has increasingly become a target for rightwing historians andcommentators seeking to discredit Menchú’s account and to deny thegenocide carried out by the Guatemalan military regime with US support.Greg Grandin, in this crucial accompaniment to Menchú’s work, takes onher critics to set the story straight. He investigates the historical contextand political realities that underlie Menchú’s past and the ongoing debatesurrounding it, in this substantial new work on Guatemalan history.

Our Own Backyard

Our Own Backyard

The United States in Central America, 1977-1992

  • Author: William M. LeoGrande
  • Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press
  • ISBN: 9780807898802
  • Category: Political Science
  • Page: 792
  • View: 7844
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In this remarkable and engaging book, William LeoGrande offers the first comprehensive history of U.S. foreign policy toward Central America in the waning years of the Cold War. From the overthrow of the Somoza dynasty in Nicaragua and the outbreak of El Salvador's civil war in the late 1970s to the final regional peace settlements negotiated a decade later, he chronicles the dramatic struggles--in Washington and Central America--that shaped the region's destiny. For good or ill, LeoGrande argues, Central America's fate hinged on decisions that were subject to intense struggles among, and within, Congress, the CIA, the Pentagon, the State Department, and the White House--decisions over which Central Americans themselves had little influence. Like the domestic turmoil unleashed by Vietnam, he says, the struggle over Central America was so divisive that it damaged the fabric of democratic politics at home. It inflamed the tug-of-war between Congress and the executive branch over control of foreign policy and ultimately led to the Iran-contra affair, the nation's most serious political crisis since Watergate.

The Last Colonial Massacre

The Last Colonial Massacre

Latin America in the Cold War, Updated Edition

  • Author: Greg Grandin,Naomi Klein
  • Publisher: University of Chicago Press
  • ISBN: 0226306909
  • Category: History
  • Page: 319
  • View: 8283
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After decades of bloodshed and political terror, many lament the rise of the left in Latin America. Since the triumph of Castro, politicians and historians have accused the left there of rejecting democracy, embracing communist totalitarianism, and prompting both revolutionary violence and a right-wing backlash. Through unprecedented archival research and gripping personal testimonies, Greg Grandin powerfully challenges these views in this classic work. In doing so, he uncovers the hidden history of the Latin American Cold War: of hidebound reactionaries holding on to their power and privilege; of Mayan Marxists blending indigenous notions of justice with universal ideas of equality; and of a United States supporting new styles of state terror throughout the region. With Guatemala as his case study, Grandin argues that the Latin American Cold War was a struggle not between political liberalism and Soviet communism but two visions of democracy—one vibrant and egalitarian, the other tepid and unequal—and that the conflict’s main effect was to eliminate homegrown notions of social democracy. Updated with a new preface by the author and an interview with Naomi Klein, The Last Colonial Massacre is history of the highest order—a work that will dramatically recast our understanding of Latin American politics and the role of the United States in the Cold War and beyond. “This work admirably explains the process in which hopes of democracy were brutally repressed in Guatemala and its people experienced a civil war lasting for half a century.”—International History Review “A richly detailed, humane, and passionately subversive portrait of inspiring reformers tragically redefined by the Cold War as enemies of the state.”—Journal of American History

Kissinger's Shadow

Kissinger's Shadow

The Long Reach of America's Most Controversial Statesman

  • Author: Greg Grandin
  • Publisher: Metropolitan Books
  • ISBN: 1627794506
  • Category: Biography & Autobiography
  • Page: 224
  • View: 3119
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A new account of America's most controversial diplomat that moves beyond praise or condemnation to reveal Kissinger as the architect of America's current imperial stance In his fascinating new book Kissinger's Shadow, acclaimed historian Greg Grandin argues that to understand the crisis of contemporary America—its never-ending wars abroad and political polarization at home—we have to understand Henry Kissinger. Examining Kissinger's own writings, as well as a wealth of newly declassified documents, Grandin reveals how Richard Nixon's top foreign policy advisor, even as he was presiding over defeat in Vietnam and a disastrous, secret, and illegal war in Cambodia, was helping to revive a militarized version of American exceptionalism centered on an imperial presidency. Believing that reality could be bent to his will, insisting that intuition is more important in determining policy than hard facts, and vowing that past mistakes should never hinder future bold action, Kissinger anticipated, even enabled, the ascendance of the neoconservative idealists who took America into crippling wars in Afghanistan and Iraq. Going beyond accounts focusing either on Kissinger's crimes or accomplishments, Grandin offers a compelling new interpretation of the diplomat's continuing influence on how the United States views its role in the world.

Beneath the United States

Beneath the United States

A History of U. S. Policy Toward Latin America

  • Author: Lars Schoultz
  • Publisher: Harvard University Press
  • ISBN: 9780674043282
  • Category: Biography & Autobiography
  • Page: 496
  • View: 3655
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In this sweeping history of United States policy toward Latin America, Lars Schoultz shows that the United States has always perceived Latin America as a fundamentally inferior neighbor, unable to manage its affairs and stubbornly underdeveloped. This perception of inferiority was apparent from the beginning. John Quincy Adams, who first established diplomatic relations with Latin America, believed that Hispanics were "lazy, dirty, nasty...a parcel of hogs." In the early nineteenth century, ex-President John Adams declared that any effort to implant democracy in Latin America was "as absurd as similar plans would be to establish democracies among the birds, beasts, and fishes." Drawing on extraordinarily rich archival sources, Schoultz, one of the country's foremost Latin America scholars, shows how these core beliefs have not changed for two centuries. We have combined self-interest with a "civilizing mission"--a self-abnegating effort by a superior people to help a substandard civilization overcome its defects. William Howard Taft felt the way to accomplish this task was "to knock their heads together until they should maintain peace," while in 1959 CIA Director Allen Dulles warned that "the new Cuban officials had to be treated more or less like children." Schoultz shows that the policies pursued reflected these deeply held convictions. While political correctness censors the expression of such sentiments today, the actions of the United States continue to assume the political and cultural inferiority of Latin America. Schoultz demonstrates that not until the United States perceives its southern neighbors as equals can it anticipate a constructive hemispheric alliance.

Until the Rulers Obey

Until the Rulers Obey

Voices from Latine American Social Movements

  • Author: Clifton Ross,Marcy Rein
  • Publisher: PM Press
  • ISBN: 1604867949
  • Category: Political Science
  • Page: 544
  • View: 6903
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Collects interviews with social movement organizers, activists, writers, and scholars examining the wave of change in Latin America and debating pressing questions of power, organizational form, and relations with the state.

Dependency and Development in Latin America (Dependencia Y Desarrollo en América Latina, Engl.)

Dependency and Development in Latin America (Dependencia Y Desarrollo en América Latina, Engl.)

  • Author: Fernando Henrique Cardoso,Enzo Faletto
  • Publisher: Univ of California Press
  • ISBN: 9780520035270
  • Category: Business & Economics
  • Page: 227
  • View: 7467
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At the end of World War II, several Latin American countries seemed to be ready for industrialization and self-sustaining economic growth. Instead, they found that they had exchanged old forms of political and economic dependence for a new kind of dependency on the international capitalism of multinational corporations. In the much-acclaimed original Spanish edition (Dependencia y Desarrollo en Am�rica Latina) and now in the expanded and revised English version, Cardoso and Faletto offer a sophisticated analysis of the economic development of Latin America. The economic dependency of Latin America stems not merely from the domination of the world market over internal national and "enclave” economies, but also from the much more complex interact ion of economic drives, political structures, social movements, and historically conditioned alliances. While heeding the unique histories of individual nations, the authors discern four general stages in Latin America's economic development: the early outward expansion of newly independent nations, the political emergence of the middle sector, the formation of internal markets in response to population growth, and the new dependence on international markets. In a postscript for this edition, Cardoso and Faletto examine the political, social and economic changes of the past ten years in light of their original hypotheses.

The World's Richest Neighborhood

The World's Richest Neighborhood

How Pittsburgh's East Enders Forged American Industry

  • Author: Quentin R. Skrabec
  • Publisher: Algora Publishing
  • ISBN: 0875867979
  • Category: Biography & Autobiography
  • Page: 233
  • View: 2303
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The residents of Pittsburgh's East End controlled as much a 40% of America's assets at the turn of the last century. Mail was delivered seven times a day to keep America's greatest capitalists in touch with their factories, banks, and markets. The neighborhood had its own private station of the Pennsylvania Railroad with a daily non-stop express to New York's financial district. Many of the world's most powerful men - princes, artists, politicians, scientists, and American Presidents such as William McKinley, Teddy Roosevelt, William Taft, Calvin Coolidge, and Herbert Hoover, came to visit the hard-working and high-flying captains of industry. Two major corporations, Standard Oil and ALCOA Aluminum were formed in East End homes. It was the first neighborhood to adopt the telephone with direct lines from the homes to the biggest banks in Pittsburgh, which at the time was America's fifth largest city. The story of this neighborhood is a story of America at its greatest point of wealth and includes rags-to-riches stories, political corruption, scandals, and greed. The history of this unique piece of American geography makes for enjoyable reading that will satisfy a large cross section of readers.

Blood Brothers

Blood Brothers

  • Author: Steve J. King
  • Publisher: N.A
  • ISBN: 9781420844856
  • Category: Fiction
  • Page: 232
  • View: 6899
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This book describes all the different feelings I have felt throughout my life about love. Times when I thought I was in love and times when I was in love. These feelings for me started as a teenager and continued during my life. Sometimes we can't explain to our love ones what we need to say, and since I have that gift, I want to share it with all the lovers and friends throughout the world.

The Blood of Guatemala

The Blood of Guatemala

A History of Race and Nation

  • Author: Greg Grandin
  • Publisher: Duke University Press
  • ISBN: 0822380331
  • Category: Social Science
  • Page: 364
  • View: 4870
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Over the latter half of the twentieth century, the Guatemalan state slaughtered more than two hundred thousand of its citizens. In the wake of this violence, a vibrant pan-Mayan movement has emerged, one that is challenging Ladino (non-indigenous) notions of citizenship and national identity. In The Blood of Guatemala Greg Grandin locates the origins of this ethnic resurgence within the social processes of eighteenth- and nineteenth-century state formation rather than in the ruins of the national project of recent decades. Focusing on Mayan elites in the community of Quetzaltenango, Grandin shows how their efforts to maintain authority over the indigenous population and secure political power in relation to non-Indians played a crucial role in the formation of the Guatemalan nation. To explore the close connection between nationalism, state power, ethnic identity, and political violence, Grandin draws on sources as diverse as photographs, public rituals, oral testimony, literature, and a collection of previously untapped documents written during the nineteenth century. He explains how the cultural anxiety brought about by Guatemala’s transition to coffee capitalism during this period led Mayan patriarchs to develop understandings of race and nation that were contrary to Ladino notions of assimilation and progress. This alternative national vision, however, could not take hold in a country plagued by class and ethnic divisions. In the years prior to the 1954 coup, class conflict became impossible to contain as the elites violently opposed land claims made by indigenous peasants. This “history of power” reconsiders the way scholars understand the history of Guatemala and will be relevant to those studying nation building and indigenous communities across Latin America.

A History of Latin America

A History of Latin America

  • Author: Benjamin Keen,Keith Haynes
  • Publisher: Cengage Learning
  • ISBN: 1133711367
  • Category: History
  • Page: 464
  • View: 2689
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This best-selling text for introductory Latin American history courses encompasses political and diplomatic theory, class structure and economic organization, culture and religion, and the environment. The integrating framework is the dependency theory, the most popular interpretation of Latin American history, which stresses the economic relationship of Latin American nations to wealthier nations, particularly the United States. Spanning pre-historic times to the present, A HISTORY OF LATIN AMERICA takes both a chronological and a nation-by-nation approach, and includes the most recent historical analysis and the most up-to-date scholarship. The Ninth Edition includes expanded coverage of social and cultural history (including music) throughout and increased attention to women, indigenous cultures, and Afro-Latino people assures well balanced coverage of the region's diverse histories. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.

Inevitable Revolutions

Inevitable Revolutions

The United States in Central America

  • Author: Walter LaFeber
  • Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
  • ISBN: 9780393309645
  • Category: Political Science
  • Page: 452
  • View: 2657
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Analyzes and evaluates United States activities, over the decades, in Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador, Nicaragua, and Costa Rica

Turning the Tide

Turning the Tide

U.S. Intervention in Central America and the Struggle for Peace

  • Author: Noam Chomsky
  • Publisher: Haymarket Books
  • ISBN: 1608464474
  • Category: Political Science
  • Page: 298
  • View: 4624
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Noam Chomsky addresses relations throughout Central America and relates these to superpower conflicts and the overall role of the Cold War in contemporary international relations.