Search Results for "everything-you-need-to-know-about-asian-american-history"

Everything You Need to Know About Asian-American History

Everything You Need to Know About Asian-American History

  • Author: Lan Cao
  • Publisher: Turtleback
  • ISBN: 9780613100861
  • Category: Juvenile Nonfiction
  • Page: N.A
  • View: 9857
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Utilizing a question-and-answer format, an overview of Asian American history documents the impact of Chinese, Japanese, Vietnamese, Korean, Indian, and Pacific Island cultures on American society

Everything You Need to Know about Latino History

Everything You Need to Know about Latino History

  • Author: Himilce Novas
  • Publisher: Penguin
  • ISBN: 9780452288898
  • Category: History
  • Page: 412
  • View: 937
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Provides an overview of Latino culture and history, examining Mexican Americans, Puerto Ricans, and other groups, and discusses such topics as immigration, politics, and social, cultural, and economic trends.

A Kid's Guide to Asian American History

A Kid's Guide to Asian American History

More Than 70 Activities

  • Author: Valerie Petrillo
  • Publisher: Chicago Review Press
  • ISBN: 1613740379
  • Category: Juvenile Nonfiction
  • Page: 256
  • View: 708
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Hands-on activities, games, and crafts introduce children to the diversity of Asian American cultures and teach them about the people, experiences, and events that have shaped Asian American history. This book is broken down into sections covering American descendents from various Asian countries, including China, Japan, Korea, Philippines, India, Vietnam, Laos, and Cambodia. Topics include the history of immigration from Asian countries, important events in U.S. history, sidebars on famous Asian Americans, language lessons, and activities that highlight arts, games, food, clothing, unique celebrations, and folklore. Kids can paint a calligraphy banner, practice Tai Chi, fold an origami dog or cat, build a Japanese rock garden, construct a Korean kite, cook bibingka, and create a chalk rangoli. A time line, glossary, and recommendations for Web sites, books, movies, and museums round out this multicultural guide.

The Making of Asian America

The Making of Asian America

A History

  • Author: Erika Lee
  • Publisher: Simon and Schuster
  • ISBN: 1476739412
  • Category: History
  • Page: 528
  • View: 7670
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"The definitive history of Asian Americans by one of the nation's preeminent scholars on the subject. In the past fifty years, Asian Americans have helped change the face of America and are now the fastest growing group in the United States. But as award-winning historian Erika Lee reminds us, Asian Americans also have deep roots in the country. The Making of Asian America tells the little-known history of Asian Americans and their role in American life, from the arrival of the first Asians in the Americas to the present-day. An epic history of global journeys and new beginnings, this book shows how generations of Asian immigrants and their American-born descendants have made and remade Asian American life in the United States: sailors who came on the first trans-Pacific ships in the 1500s; indentured "coolies" who worked alongside African slaves in the Caribbean; and Chinese, Japanese, Filipino, Korean, and South Asian immigrants who were recruited to work in the United States only to face massive racial discrimination, Asian exclusion laws, and for Japanese Americans, incarceration during World War II. Over the past fifty years, a new Asian America has emerged out of community activism and the arrival of new immigrants and refugees. No longer a "despised minority," Asian Americans are now held up as America's "model minorities" in ways that reveal the complicated role that race still plays in the United States. Published to commemorate the fiftieth anniversary of the passage of the United States' Immigration and Nationality Act of 1965 that has remade our "nation of immigrants," this is a new and definitive history of Asian Americans. But more than that, it is a new way of understanding America itself, its complicated histories of race and immigration, and its place in the world today"--

Strangers from a Different Shore

Strangers from a Different Shore

A History of Asian Americans (Updated and Revised)

  • Author: Professor of Ethnic Studies Ronald Takaki,Ronald Takaki
  • Publisher: eBookIt.com
  • ISBN: 1456611070
  • Category: History
  • Page: 591
  • View: 2668
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In an extraordinary blend of narrative history, personal recollection, & oral testimony, the author presents a sweeping history of Asian Americans. He writes of the Chinese who laid tracks for the transcontinental railroad, of plantation laborers in the canefields of Hawaii, of "picture brides" marrying strangers in the hope of becoming part of the American dream. He tells stories of Japanese Americans behind the barbed wire of U.S. internment camps during World War II, Hmong refugees tragically unable to adjust to Wisconsin's alien climate & culture, & Asian American students stigmatized by the stereotype of the "model minority." This is a powerful & moving work that will resonate for all Americans, who together make up a nation of immigrants from other shores.

Asian American History and Culture: An Encyclopedia

Asian American History and Culture: An Encyclopedia

An Encyclopedia

  • Author: Huping Ling,Allan W. Austin
  • Publisher: Routledge
  • ISBN: 1317476441
  • Category: Business & Economics
  • Page: 670
  • View: 4758
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With overview essays and more than 400 A-Z entries, this exhaustive encyclopedia documents the history of Asians in America from earliest contact to the present day. Organized topically by group, with an in-depth overview essay on each group, the encyclopedia examines the myriad ethnic groups and histories that make up the Asian American population in the United States. "Asian American History and Culture" covers the political, social, and cultural history of immigrants from East Asia, Southeast Asia, South Asia, the Pacific Islands, and their descendants, as well as the social and cultural issues faced by Asian American communities, families, and individuals in contemporary society. In addition to entries on various groups and cultures, the encyclopedia also includes articles on general topics such as parenting and child rearing, assimilation and acculturation, business, education, and literature. More than 100 images round out the set.

Crazy Rich Asians

Crazy Rich Asians

  • Author: Kevin Kwan
  • Publisher: Anchor
  • ISBN: 0385536984
  • Category: Fiction
  • Page: 416
  • View: 1992
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A hilarious and heartwarming New York Times bestselling novel—now a major motion picture! “This 48-karat beach read is crazy fun.” —Entertainment Weekly When New Yorker Rachel Chu agrees to spend the summer in Singapore with her boyfriend, Nicholas Young, she envisions a humble family home and quality time with the man she hopes to marry. But Nick has failed to give his girlfriend a few key details. One, that his childhood home looks like a palace; two, that he grew up riding in more private planes than cars; and three, that he just happens to be the country’s most eligible bachelor. On Nick’s arm, Rachel may as well have a target on her back the second she steps off the plane, and soon, her relaxed vacation turns into an obstacle course of old money, new money, nosy relatives, and scheming social climbers.

The Asian American Achievement Paradox

The Asian American Achievement Paradox

  • Author: Jennifer Lee,Min Zhou
  • Publisher: Russell Sage Foundation
  • ISBN: 1610448502
  • Category: Social Science
  • Page: 266
  • View: 5926
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Asian Americans are often stereotyped as the “model minority.” Their sizeable presence at elite universities and high household incomes have helped construct the narrative of Asian American “exceptionalism.” While many scholars and activists characterize this as a myth, pundits claim that Asian Americans’ educational attainment is the result of unique cultural values. In The Asian American Achievement Paradox, sociologists Jennifer Lee and Min Zhou offer a compelling account of the academic achievement of the children of Asian immigrants. Drawing on in-depth interviews with the adult children of Chinese immigrants and Vietnamese refugees and survey data, Lee and Zhou bridge sociology and social psychology to explain how immigration laws, institutions, and culture interact to foster high achievement among certain Asian American groups. For the Chinese and Vietnamese in Los Angeles, Lee and Zhou find that the educational attainment of the second generation is strikingly similar, despite the vastly different socioeconomic profiles of their immigrant parents. Because immigration policies after 1965 favor individuals with higher levels of education and professional skills, many Asian immigrants are highly educated when they arrive in the United States. They bring a specific “success frame,” which is strictly defined as earning a degree from an elite university and working in a high-status field. This success frame is reinforced in many local Asian communities, which make resources such as college preparation courses and tutoring available to group members, including their low-income members. While the success frame accounts for part of Asian Americans’ high rates of achievement, Lee and Zhou also find that institutions, such as public schools, are crucial in supporting the cycle of Asian American achievement. Teachers and guidance counselors, for example, who presume that Asian American students are smart, disciplined, and studious, provide them with extra help and steer them toward competitive academic programs. These institutional advantages, in turn, lead to better academic performance and outcomes among Asian American students. Yet the expectations of high achievement come with a cost: the notion of Asian American success creates an “achievement paradox” in which Asian Americans who do not fit the success frame feel like failures or racial outliers. While pundits ascribe Asian American success to the assumed superior traits intrinsic to Asian culture, Lee and Zhou show how historical, cultural, and institutional elements work together to confer advantages to specific populations. An insightful counter to notions of culture based on stereotypes, The Asian American Achievement Paradox offers a deft and nuanced understanding how and why certain immigrant groups succeed.

The Asian American Movement

The Asian American Movement

  • Author: William Wei
  • Publisher: Temple University Press
  • ISBN: 1439903743
  • Category: Social Science
  • Page: 376
  • View: 1791
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The first history and analysis of the Asian American Movement.

Mobilizing an Asian American Community

Mobilizing an Asian American Community

  • Author: Linda Trinh Võ
  • Publisher: Temple University Press
  • ISBN: 9781592132621
  • Category: Social Science
  • Page: 288
  • View: 5430
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Focusing on San Diego in the post-Civil Rights era, Linda Trinh Vo examines the ways Asian Americans drew together - despite many differences within the group - to construct a community that supports a variety of social, economic, political, and cultural organizations. Using historical materials, ethnographic fieldwork, and interviews, Vo traces the political strategies that enable Asian Americans to bridge ethnicity, generation, gender, language, and class differences, among others. She demonstrates that mobilization is not a smooth, linear process and shows how the struggle over ideologies, political strategies, and resources affects the development of community organizations. Vo also analyzes how Asian Americans construct their relationship with Asia and how they forge relationships with other racialized communities of color. Vo argues that the situation in San Diego illuminates other localities across the country where Asians face challenges trying to organize, find sufficient resources, create leaders, and define strategies.

Asian American History: a Very Short Introduction

Asian American History: a Very Short Introduction

  • Author: Madeline Y. Hsu
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press
  • ISBN: 0190219769
  • Category:
  • Page: 184
  • View: 5365
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A 2012 survey by the Pew Research Center reported that Asian Americans are the best-educated, highest-income, and best-assimilated racial group in the United States. Before reaching this level of economic success and social assimilation, however, Asian immigrants' path was full of difficult, even demeaning, moments. This book provides a sweeping and nuanced history of Asian Americans, revealing how and why the perception of Asian immigrants changed over time. Asian migrants, in large part Chinese, arrived in significant numbers on the West Coast during the 1850s and 1860s to work in gold mining and on the construction of the transcontinental Railroad. Unlike their contemporary European counterparts, Asians, often stigmatized as "coolies," challenged American ideals of equality with the problem of whether all racial groups could be integrated into America's democracy. The fear of the "Yellow Peril" soon spurred an array of legislative and institutional efforts to segregate them through immigration laws, restrictions on citizenship, and limits on employment, property ownership, access to public services, and civil rights. Prejudices against Asian Americans reached a peak during World War II, when Japanese Americans were interned en masse. It was only with changes in the immigration laws and the social and political activism of the 1960s and 1970s that Asian Americans gained ground and acceptance, albeit in the still stereotyped category of "model minorities." Madeline Y. Hsu weaves a fascinating historical narrative of this "American Dream." She shows how Asian American success, often attributed to innate cultural values, is more a result of the immigration laws, which have largely pre-selected immigrants of high economic and social potential. Asian Americans have, in turn, been used by politicians to bludgeon newer (and more populous) immigrant groups for their purported lack of achievement. Hsu deftly reveals how public policy, which can restrict and also selectively promote certain immigrant populations, is a key reason why some immigrant groups appear to be more naturally successful and why the identity of those groups evolves differently from others.

Lies My Teacher Told Me

Lies My Teacher Told Me

Everything Your American History Textbook Got Wrong

  • Author: James W. Loewen
  • Publisher: The New Press
  • ISBN: 162097455X
  • Category: History
  • Page: N.A
  • View: 2261
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“Every teacher, every student of history, every citizen should read this book. It is both a refreshing antidote to what has passed for history in our educational system and a one-volume education in itself.” —Howard Zinn A new edition of the national bestseller and American Book Award winner, with a new preface by the author Since its first publication in 1995, Lies My Teacher Told Me has become one of the most important—and successful—history books of our time. Having sold nearly two million copies, the book also won an American Book Award and the Oliver Cromwell Cox Award for Distinguished Anti-Racist Scholarship and was heralded on the front page of the New York Times in the summer of 2006. For this new edition, Loewen has added a new preface that shows how inadequate history courses in high school help produce adult Americans who think Donald Trump can solve their problems, and calls out academic historians for abandoning the concept of truth in a misguided effort to be “objective.” What started out as a survey of the twelve leading American history textbooks has ended up being what the San Francisco Chronicle calls “an extremely convincing plea for truth in education.” In Lies My Teacher Told Me, James W. Loewen brings history alive in all its complexity and ambiguity. Beginning with pre-Columbian history and ranging over characters and events as diverse as Reconstruction, Helen Keller, the first Thanksgiving, the My Lai massacre, 9/11, and the Iraq War, Loewen offers an eye-opening critique of existing textbooks, and a wonderful retelling of American history as it should—and could—be taught to American students.

Asian Americans: An Encyclopedia of Social, Cultural, Economic, and Political History [3 volumes]

Asian Americans: An Encyclopedia of Social, Cultural, Economic, and Political History [3 volumes]

An Encyclopedia of Social, Cultural, Economic, and Political History

  • Author: Xiaojian Zhao,Edward J.W. Park Ph.D.
  • Publisher: ABC-CLIO
  • ISBN: 1598842404
  • Category: Social Science
  • Page: 1401
  • View: 5775
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This is the most comprehensive and up-to-date reference work on Asian Americans, comprising three volumes that address a broad range of topics on various Asian and Pacific Islander American groups from 1848 to the present day. • Presents information on Asian Americans and individual Asian ethnic groups that provides comprehensive overviews of the respective groups • Includes special topic entries that contain source information regarding major historical events • Comprises work from a truly outstanding list of contributors that include scholars, journalists, writers, community activists, graduate students, and other specialists • Expands the boundaries of Asian American studies through innovative entries that address transnationalism, gender and sexuality, and inter- and cross-disciplinarity

A Part, Yet Apart

A Part, Yet Apart

South Asians in Asian America

  • Author: Lavina Dhingra Shankar,Rajini Srikanth
  • Publisher: Temple University Press
  • ISBN: 9781439904558
  • Category:
  • Page: N.A
  • View: 9336
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Asian Americans

Asian Americans

an interpretive history

  • Author: Sucheng Chan
  • Publisher: Twayne Publishers
  • ISBN: N.A
  • Category: History
  • Page: 242
  • View: 5633
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Traces the history of Asian immigration from the California gold rush to Vietnamese boat people, describes patterns of work, social adaptation, and family formation, and explains how they coped with discrimination

Immigrant Acts

Immigrant Acts

On Asian American Cultural Politics

  • Author: Lisa Lowe
  • Publisher: Duke University Press
  • ISBN: 9780822318644
  • Category: Literary Criticism
  • Page: 252
  • View: 2860
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In Immigrant Acts, Lisa Lowe argues that understanding Asian immigration to the United States is fundamental to understanding the racialized economic and political foundations of the nation. Lowe discusses the contradictions whereby Asians have been included in the workplaces and markets of the U.S. nation-state, yet, through exclusion laws and bars from citizenship, have been distanced from the terrain of national culture. Lowe argues that a national memory haunts the conception of Asian American, persisting beyond the repeal of individual laws and sustained by U.S. wars in Asia, in which the Asian is seen as the perpetual immigrant, as the “foreigner-within.” In Immigrant Acts, she argues that rather than attesting to the absorption of cultural difference into the universality of the national political sphere, the Asian immigrant—at odds with the cultural, racial, and linguistic forms of the nation—displaces the temporality of assimilation. Distance from the American national culture constitutes Asian American culture as an alternative site that produces cultural forms materially and aesthetically in contradiction with the institutions of citizenship and national identity. Rather than a sign of a “failed” integration of Asians into the American cultural sphere, this critique preserves and opens up different possibilities for political practice and coalition across racial and national borders. In this uniquely interdisciplinary study, Lowe examines the historical, political, cultural, and aesthetic meanings of immigration in relation to Asian Americans. Extending the range of Asian American critique, Immigrant Acts will interest readers concerned with race and ethnicity in the United States, American cultures, immigration, and transnationalism.

A New History of Asian America

A New History of Asian America

  • Author: Shelley Sang-Hee Lee
  • Publisher: Routledge
  • ISBN: 1135071063
  • Category: History
  • Page: 368
  • View: 6798
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A New History of Asian America is a fresh and up-to-date history of Asians in the United States from the late eighteenth century to the present. Drawing on current scholarship, Shelley Lee brings forward the many strands of Asian American history, highlighting the distinctive nature of the Asian American experience while placing the narrative in the context of the major trajectories and turning points of U.S. history. Covering the history of Filipinos, Koreans, Asian Indians, and Southeast Indians as well as Chinese and Japanese, the book gives full attention to the diversity within Asian America. A robust companion website features additional resources for students, including primary documents, a timeline, links, videos, and an image gallery. From the building of the transcontinental railroad to the celebrity of Jeremy Lin, people of Asian descent have been involved in and affected by the history of America. A New History of Asian America gives twenty-first-century students a clear, comprehensive, and contemporary introduction to this vital history.

The Color of Success

The Color of Success

Asian Americans and the Origins of the Model Minority

  • Author: Ellen D. Wu
  • Publisher: Princeton University Press
  • ISBN: 1400848873
  • Category: History
  • Page: 376
  • View: 8676
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The Color of Success tells of the astonishing transformation of Asians in the United States from the "yellow peril" to "model minorities"--peoples distinct from the white majority but lauded as well-assimilated, upwardly mobile, and exemplars of traditional family values--in the middle decades of the twentieth century. As Ellen Wu shows, liberals argued for the acceptance of these immigrant communities into the national fold, charging that the failure of America to live in accordance with its democratic ideals endangered the country's aspirations to world leadership. Weaving together myriad perspectives, Wu provides an unprecedented view of racial reform and the contradictions of national belonging in the civil rights era. She highlights the contests for power and authority within Japanese and Chinese America alongside the designs of those external to these populations, including government officials, social scientists, journalists, and others. And she demonstrates that the invention of the model minority took place in multiple arenas, such as battles over zoot suiters leaving wartime internment camps, the juvenile delinquency panic of the 1950s, Hawaii statehood, and the African American freedom movement. Together, these illuminate the impact of foreign relations on the domestic racial order and how the nation accepted Asians as legitimate citizens while continuing to perceive them as indelible outsiders. By charting the emergence of the model minority stereotype, The Color of Success reveals that this far-reaching, politically charged process continues to have profound implications for how Americans understand race, opportunity, and nationhood.

Asian American Art

Asian American Art

A History, 1850-1970

  • Author: Gordon H. Chang,Mark Dean Johnson,Paul J. Karlstrom,Sharon Spain
  • Publisher: Stanford University Press
  • ISBN: 0804757526
  • Category: Art
  • Page: 547
  • View: 486
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Presents a comprehensive study of the lives and artistic productions of Asian American artists from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

This Is All I Choose to Tell

This Is All I Choose to Tell

History and Hybridity in Vietnamese American Literature

  • Author: Isabelle Thuy Pelaud
  • Publisher: Temple University Press
  • ISBN: 1439902178
  • Category: Literary Criticism
  • Page: 198
  • View: 5703
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In the first book-length study of Vietnamese American literature, Isabelle Thuy Pelaud probes the complexities of Vietnamese American identity and politics. She provides an analytical introduction to the literature, showing how generational differences play out in genre and text. In addition, she asks, can the term Vietnamese American be disassociated from representations of the war without erasing its legacy? Pelaud delineates the historical, social, and cultural terrains of the writing as well as the critical receptions and responses to them. She moves beyond the common focus on the Vietnam war to develop an interpretive framework that integrates post-colonialism with the multi-generational refugee, immigrant, and transnational experiences at the center of Vietnamese American narratives. Her readings of key works, such as Andrew Pham's Catfish and Mandala and Lan Cao's Monkey Bridge show how trauma, racism, class and gender play a role in shaping the identities of Vietnamese American characters and narrators.