Search Results for "immigrant-acts"

Immigrant Acts

Immigrant Acts

On Asian American Cultural Politics

  • Author: Lisa Lowe
  • Publisher: Duke University Press
  • ISBN: 9780822318644
  • Category: Literary Criticism
  • Page: 252
  • View: 1876
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In Immigrant Acts, Lisa Lowe argues that understanding Asian immigration to the United States is fundamental to understanding the racialized economic and political foundations of the nation. Lowe discusses the contradictions whereby Asians have been included in the workplaces and markets of the U.S. nation-state, yet, through exclusion laws and bars from citizenship, have been distanced from the terrain of national culture. Lowe argues that a national memory haunts the conception of Asian American, persisting beyond the repeal of individual laws and sustained by U.S. wars in Asia, in which the Asian is seen as the perpetual immigrant, as the “foreigner-within.” In Immigrant Acts, she argues that rather than attesting to the absorption of cultural difference into the universality of the national political sphere, the Asian immigrant—at odds with the cultural, racial, and linguistic forms of the nation—displaces the temporality of assimilation. Distance from the American national culture constitutes Asian American culture as an alternative site that produces cultural forms materially and aesthetically in contradiction with the institutions of citizenship and national identity. Rather than a sign of a “failed” integration of Asians into the American cultural sphere, this critique preserves and opens up different possibilities for political practice and coalition across racial and national borders. In this uniquely interdisciplinary study, Lowe examines the historical, political, cultural, and aesthetic meanings of immigration in relation to Asian Americans. Extending the range of Asian American critique, Immigrant Acts will interest readers concerned with race and ethnicity in the United States, American cultures, immigration, and transnationalism.

Immigrant Rights in the Shadows of Citizenship

Immigrant Rights in the Shadows of Citizenship

  • Author: Rachel Ida Buff
  • Publisher: NYU Press
  • ISBN: 0814789749
  • Category: Social Science
  • Page: 448
  • View: 3906
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Punctuated by marches across the United States in the spring of 2006, immigrant rights has reemerged as a significant and highly visible political issue. Immigrant Rights in the Shadows of U.S. Citizenship brings prominent activists and scholars together to examine the emergence and significance of the contemporary immigrant rights movement. Contributors place the contemporary immigrant rights movement in historical and comparative contexts by looking at the ways immigrants and their allies have staked claims to rights in the past, and by examining movements based in different communities around the United States. Scholars explain the evolution of immigration policy, and analyze current conflicts around issues of immigrant rights; activists engaged in the current movement document the ways in which coalitions have been built among immigrants from different nations, and between immigrant and native born peoples. The essays examine the ways in which questions of immigrant rights engage broader issues of identity, including gender, race, and sexuality.

Intersectionality

Intersectionality

A Foundations and Frontiers Reader

  • Author: Patrick R. Grzanka
  • Publisher: Routledge
  • ISBN: 0429979320
  • Category: Social Science
  • Page: 386
  • View: 1136
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Intersectionality: A Foundations and Frontiers Reader is an accessible, primary-source driven exploration of intersectionality in sociology and related fields. The book maps the origins of the concept, particularly in Black feminist thought and sociology, opens the discourse to challenges and applications across disciplines and outside academia, and explores the leading edges of scholarship to reveal important new directions for inquiry and activism. Charting the development of intersectionality as an intellectual and political movement, Patrick R. Grzanka brings together in one text both foundational readings and emerging classics. Original material includes: Grzanka's nuanced introduction which provides broad context and poses guiding questions; thematic unit introductions; author biographies and suggestions for further reading to ground each excerpt; and a conclusion by Bonnie Thornton Dill reflecting on the past, present, and future of intersectionality. With its balanced mix of analytical, applied, and original content, Intersectionality is an essential component of any course on race, class, and gender, feminist theory, or social inequalities.

U.S. Central Americans

U.S. Central Americans

Reconstructing Memories, Struggles, and Communities of Resistance

  • Author: Karina Oliva Alvarado,Alicia I. Estrada,Ester E. Hernández
  • Publisher: University of Arizona Press
  • ISBN: 0816534063
  • Category: History
  • Page: 256
  • View: 5851
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This interdisciplinary edited volume of thirteen essays presents a broad look at the Central American experience in the United States with a focus on Southern California. By examining oral histories, art, poetry, and community formation, the contributors fill a void in the scholarship on the multiple histories, experiences, and forms of resistance of Central American groups in the United States. The contributors provide new research on the 1.5 generation and beyond and how the transnational dynamics manifest in California, home to one of the largest U.S. Central American populations.

The New Humor in the Progressive Era

The New Humor in the Progressive Era

Americanization and the Vaudeville Comedian

  • Author: R. DesRochers
  • Publisher: Springer
  • ISBN: 1137357185
  • Category: Performing Arts
  • Page: 187
  • View: 5260
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By tracing the effects of unprecedented immigration, the advent of the new woman, and the little-known vaudeville careers of performers like the Elinore Sisters, Buster Keaton, and the Marx Brothers, DesRochers examines the relation between comedic vaudeville acts and progressive reformers as they fought over the new definition of "Americanness."

Southeastern Geographer

Southeastern Geographer

Innovations in Southern Studies, Winter 2011

  • Author: Robert Brinkmann,Graham A. Tobin
  • Publisher: UNC Press Books
  • ISBN: 0807882879
  • Category: Social Science
  • Page: 152
  • View: 5328
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Table of Contents for Volume 51, Number 4 (Winter 2011) Introduction: With Thanks Graham A. Tobin and Robert Brinkmann Innovations in Southern Studies within Geography Derek H. Alderman and William Graves The Bible Belt in a Changing South: Shrinking, Relocating, and Multiple Buckles Stanley D. Brunn, Gerald R. Webster, and J. Clark Archer Emerging Patterns of Growth and Change in the Southeast Benjamin J. Shultz Geographies of Race in the American South: The Continuing Legacies of Jim Crow Segregation Joshua F. J. Inwood Jim Crow, Civil Defense, and the Hydrogen Bomb: Race, Evacuation Planning, and the Geopolitics of Fear in 1950s Savannah, Georgia Jonathan Leib and Thomas Chapman Representing the Immigrant: Social Movements, Political Discourse, and Immigration in the U.S. South Jamie Winders Water, Water, Everywhere? Toward a Critical Water Geography of the South Christopher F. Meindl The Politics of Mobility in the South: A Commentary on Sprawl,Automobility, and the Gulf Oil Spill Jason Henderson Southeastern Geographer is published by UNC Press for the Southeastern Division of the Association of American Geographers (www.sedaag.org). The quarterly journal publishes the academic work of geographers and other social and physical scientists, and features peer-reviewed articles and essays that reflect sound scholarship and contain significant contributions to geographical understanding, with a special interest in work that focuses on the southeastern United States.

A Race So Different

A Race So Different

Performance and Law in Asian America

  • Author: Joshua Takano Chambers-Letson
  • Publisher: NYU Press
  • ISBN: 0814771610
  • Category: Social Science
  • Page: 279
  • View: 4955
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Winner of the 2014 Outstanding Book Award presented by the Association for Theatre in Higher Education Taking a performance studies approach to understanding Asian American racial subjectivity, Joshua Takano Chambers-Letson argues that the law influences racial formation by compelling Asian Americans to embody and perform recognizable identities in both popular aesthetic forms (such as theater, opera, or rock music) and in the rituals of everyday life. Tracing the production of Asian American selfhood from the era of Asian Exclusion through the Global War on Terror, A Race So Different explores the legal paradox whereby U.S. law apprehends the Asian American body as simultaneously excluded from and included within the national body politic. Bringing together broadly defined forms of performance, from artistic works such as Madame Butterfly to the Supreme Court’s oral arguments in the Cambodian American deportation cases of the twenty-first century, this book invites conversation about how Asian American performance uses the stage to document, interrogate, and complicate the processes of racialization in U.S. law. Through his impressive use of a rich legal and cultural archive, Chambers-Letson articulates a robust understanding of the construction of social and racial realities in the contemporary United States.

Racial Stigma on the Hollywood Screen from World War II to the Present

Racial Stigma on the Hollywood Screen from World War II to the Present

The Orientalist Buddy Film

  • Author: Brian Locke
  • Publisher: Springer
  • ISBN: 0230101674
  • Category: Performing Arts
  • Page: 208
  • View: 4858
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Racial Stigma on the Hollywood Screen from WWII to the Present charts how the dominant white and black binary of American racial discourse influences Hollywood s representation of the Asian. The Orientalist buddy film draws a scenario in which two buddies, one white and one black, transcend an initial hatred for one another by joining forces against a foreign Asian menace. Alongside an analysis of multiple genres of film, Brian Locke argues that this triangulated rendering of race ameliorates the longstanding historical contradiction between U.S. democratic ideals and white America s persistent domination over blacks.

The Racial Mundane

The Racial Mundane

Asian American Performance and the Embodied Everyday

  • Author: Ju Yon Kim
  • Publisher: NYU Press
  • ISBN: 1479821748
  • Category: Social Science
  • Page: 304
  • View: 4612
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Winner, Lois P. Rudnick Book Prize presented by the New England American Studies Association Across the twentieth century, national controversies involving Asian Americans have drawn attention to such seemingly unremarkable activities as eating rice, greeting customers, and studying for exams. While public debates about Asian Americans have invoked quotidian practices to support inconsistent claims about racial difference, diverse aesthetic projects have tested these claims by experimenting with the relationships among habit, body, and identity. In The Racial Mundane, Ju Yon Kim argues that the ambiguous relationship between behavioral tendencies and the body has sustained paradoxical characterizations of Asian Americans as ideal and impossible Americans. The body’s uncertain attachment to its routine motions promises alternately to materialize racial distinctions and to dissolve them. Kim’s study focuses on works of theater, fiction, and film that explore the interface between racialized bodies and everyday enactments to reveal new and latent affiliations. The various modes of performance developed in these works not only encourage audiences to see habitual behaviors differently, but also reveal the stakes of noticing such behaviors at all. Integrating studies of race, performance, and the everyday, The Racial Mundane invites readers to reflect on how and to what effect perfunctory behaviors become objects of public scrutiny.

The Gun and the Pen

The Gun and the Pen

Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Faulkner, and the Fiction of Mobilization

  • Author: Keith Gandal
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press
  • ISBN: 0199313989
  • Category: Literary Criticism
  • Page: 288
  • View: 9675
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Ernest Hemingway, F. Scott Fitzgerald, and William Faulkner stand as the American voice of the Great War. But was it warfare that drove them to write? Not according to Keith Gandal, who argues that the authors' famous postwar novels were motivated not by their experiences of the horrors of war but rather by their failure to have those experiences. These 'quintessential' male American novelists of the 1920s were all, for different reasons, deemed unsuitable as candidates for full military service or command. As a result, Gandal contends, they felt themselves emasculated--not, as the usual story goes, due to their encounters with trench warfare, but because they got nowhere near the real action. Bringing to light previously unexamined Army records, including new information about the intelligence tests, The Gun and the Pen demonstrates that the authors' frustrated military ambitions took place in the forgotten context of the unprecedented U.S. mobilization for the Great War, a radical effort to transform the Army into a meritocratic institution, indifferent to ethnic and class difference (though not to racial difference). For these Lost Generation writers, the humiliating failure vis-?-vis the Army meant an embarrassment before women and an inability to compete successfully in a rising social order, against a new set of people. The Gun and the Pen restores these seminal novels to their proper historical context and offers a major revision of our understanding of America's postwar literature.

That Pride of Race and Character

That Pride of Race and Character

The Roots of Jewish Benevolence in the Jim Crow South

  • Author: Caroline E. Light
  • Publisher: NYU Press
  • ISBN: 1479835773
  • Category: History
  • Page: 304
  • View: 6227
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“It has ever been the boast of the Jewish people, that they support their own poor,” declared Kentucky attorney Benjamin Franklin Jonas in 1856. “Their reasons are partly founded in religious necessity, and partly in that pride of race and character which has supported them through so many ages of trial and vicissitude.” In That Pride of Race and Character, Caroline E. Light examines the American Jewish tradition of benevolence and charity and explores its southern roots. Light provides a critical analysis of benevolence as it was inflected by regional ideals of race and gender, showing how a southern Jewish benevolent empire emerged in response to the combined pressures of post-Civil War devastation and the simultaneous influx of eastern European immigration. In an effort to combat the voices of anti-Semitism and nativism, established Jewish leaders developed a sophisticated and cutting-edge network of charities in the South to ensure that Jews took care of those considered “their own” while also proving themselves to be exemplary white citizens. Drawing from confidential case files and institutional records from various southern Jewish charities, the book relates how southern Jewish leaders and their immigrant clients negotiated the complexities of “fitting in” in a place and time of significant socio-political turbulence. Ultimately, the southern Jewish call to benevolence bore the particular imprint of the region’s racial mores and left behind a rich legacy.

Cities of Others

Cities of Others

Reimagining Urban Spaces in Asian American Literature

  • Author: Xiaojing Zhou
  • Publisher: University of Washington Press
  • ISBN: 0295805420
  • Category: Literary Criticism
  • Page: 344
  • View: 3791
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Asian American literature abounds with complex depictions of American cities as spaces that reinforce racial segregation and prevent interactions across boundaries of race, culture, class, and gender. However, in Cities of Others, Xiaojing Zhou uncovers a much different narrative, providing the most comprehensive examination to date of how Asian American writers - both celebrated and overlooked - depict urban settings. Zhou goes beyond examining popular portrayals of Chinatowns by paying equal attention to life in other parts of the city. Her innovative and wide-ranging approach sheds new light on the works of Chinese, Filipino, Indian, Japanese, Korean, and Vietnamese American writers who bear witness to a variety of urban experiences and reimagine the American city as other than a segregated nation-space. Drawing on critical theories on space from urban geography, ecocriticism, and postcolonial studies, Zhou shows how spatial organization shapes identity in the works of Sui Sin Far, Bienvenido Santos, Meena Alexander, Frank Chin, Chang-rae Lee, Karen Tei Yamashita, and others. She also shows how the everyday practices of Asian American communities challenge racial segregation, reshape urban spaces, and redefine the identity of the American city. From a reimagining of the nineteenth-century flaneur figure in an Asian American context to providing a framework that allows readers to see ethnic enclaves and American cities as mutually constitutive and transformative, Zhou gives us a provocative new way to understand some of the most important works of Asian American literature.

A Feeling of Belonging

A Feeling of Belonging

Asian American Women's Public Culture, 1930-1960

  • Author: Shirley Jennifer Lim
  • Publisher: NYU Press
  • ISBN: 0814751938
  • Category: History
  • Page: 241
  • View: 4481
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When we imagine the activities of Asian American women in the mid-twentieth century, our first thoughts are not of skiing, beauty pageants, magazine reading, and sororities. Yet, Shirley Jennifer Lim argues, these are precisely the sorts of leisure practices many second generation Chinese, Filipina, and Japanese American women engaged in during this time. In A Feeling of Belonging, Lim highlights the cultural activities of young, predominantly unmarried Asian American women from 1930 to 1960. This period marks a crucial generation—the first in which American-born Asians formed a critical mass and began to make their presence felt in the United States. Though they were distinguished from previous generations by their American citizenship, it was only through these seemingly mundane “American”activities that they were able to overcome two-dimensional stereotypes of themselves as kimono-clad “Orientals.” Lim traces the diverse ways in which these young women sought claim to cultural citizenship, exploring such topics as the nation's first Asian American sorority, Chi Alpha Δ the cultural work of Chinese American actress Anna May Wong; Asian American youth culture and beauty pageants; and the achievement of fame of three foreign-born Asian women in the late 1950s. By wearing poodle skirts, going to the beach, and producing magazines, she argues, they asserted not just their American-ness, but their humanity: a feeling of belonging.

Guarding the Golden Door

Guarding the Golden Door

American Immigration Policy and Immigrants since 1882

  • Author: Roger Daniels
  • Publisher: Hill and Wang
  • ISBN: 1466806850
  • Category: Social Science
  • Page: 344
  • View: 2884
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As renowned historian Roger Daniels shows in this brilliant new work, America's inconsistent, often illogical, and always cumbersome immigration policy has profoundly affected our recent past. The federal government's efforts to pick and choose among the multitude of immigrants seeking to enter the United States began with the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882. Conceived in ignorance and falsely presented to the public, it had undreamt of consequences, and this pattern has been rarely deviated from since. Immigration policy in Daniels' skilled hands shows Americans at their best and worst, from the nativist violence that forced Theodore Roosevelt's 1907 "gentlemen's agreement" with Japan to the generous refugee policies adopted after World War Two and throughout the Cold War. And in a conclusion drawn from today's headlines, Daniels makes clear how far ignorance, partisan politics, and unintended consequences have overtaken immigration policy during the current administration's War on Terror. Irreverent, deeply informed, and authoritative, Guarding the Golden Door presents an unforgettable interpretation of modern American history.

Criminalization, Representation, Regulation

Criminalization, Representation, Regulation

Thinking Differently about Crime

  • Author: Deborah Brock,Amanda Glasbeek,Carmela Murdocca
  • Publisher: University of Toronto Press
  • ISBN: 1442607130
  • Category: Social Science
  • Page: 480
  • View: 7149
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What is a crime and how do we construct it? The answers to these questions are complex and entangled in a web of power relations that require us to think differently about processes of criminalization and regulation. This book draws on Foucault's concept of governmentality as a lens to analyze and critique how crime is understood, reproduced, and challenged. It explores the dynamic interplay between practices of representation, processes of criminalization, and the ways that these circulate to both reflect and constitute crime and "justice."

What’s Left of Blackness

What’s Left of Blackness

Feminisms, Transracial Solidarities, and the Politics of Belonging in Britain

  • Author: T. Fisher
  • Publisher: Springer
  • ISBN: 1137038438
  • Category: Social Science
  • Page: 189
  • View: 6288
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This book analyzes the political transformations in black women's socially engaged community-based political work in England in the late twentieth century. It situates these shifts alongside Britain's political economy and against the discourse and deployment of blackness as a political imaginary in which to engage in struggles for social justice.

Passport Photos

Passport Photos

  • Author: Amitava Kumar
  • Publisher: Univ of California Press
  • ISBN: 0520218175
  • Category: Photography
  • Page: 276
  • View: 7863
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"Passport Photos is a radiant text. It connects its own ironic lyricism with an acute awareness of historical context, and is a moving document of the questions posed by symbolic migration."—Sara Suleri Goodyear, author of Meatless Days "Amitava Kumar brings his talents as a photographer, poet, scriptwriter, and journalist to the job of critical commentary, refusing to partition and delegate these skills to separate provinces of his intellectual life. The result is an ethical voice and a technical style that often defies our expectations of the critical commentator. I find that voice and style immensely appealing, no more so than in the multi-genre documentary work of Passport Photos. This is not a heavy-handed screed on the conditions of immigrants. It is a sensuous guide to the common contradictions and experiences faced by immigrants to the U.S., whether they are coming from the underside of the international division of labor or from well-heeled and credentialed birthrights. An undeniably original contribution to several academic and journalistic fields, Passport Photos will, I expect, be a widely-acclaimed publication and much cited as a fresh paradigm-shaker."—Andrew Ross, author of The Celebration Chronicles "An important, timely, and unique book that seems to have multiple lines of descent--as if postcolonial theory were cross-pollinated with poetry, photojournalism, and memoir all at once."—Michael Bérubé, author of Life As We Know It: A Father, a Family, and an Exceptional Child "Amitava Kumar is the most grounded of the postcolonial writers today. Passport Photos is a brilliant illustration of his skills. A must read for anybody interested in immigration, transnational identities, and globalization."—Manthia Diawara, author of In Search of Africa "Passport Photos is a meditation on the modalities of the immigrant: on language as law and record of living immigrant dailiness; on place as a world one loses that gives rise to identity and belonging; on knowledge as the possession of some and not others, as what the immigrant can be but cannot have." Lisa Lowe, author of Immigrant Acts

Transforming America: Perspectives on U.S. Immigration [3 volumes]

Transforming America: Perspectives on U.S. Immigration [3 volumes]

Perspectives on U.S. Immigration

  • Author: Michael C. LeMay
  • Publisher: ABC-CLIO
  • ISBN: 0313396442
  • Category: Social Science
  • Page: 807
  • View: 9361
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Utilizing multiple perspectives of related academic disciplines, this three-volume set of contributed essays enables readers to understand the complexity of immigration to the United States and grasp how our history of immigration has made this nation what it is today.

Chinese Mexicans

Chinese Mexicans

Transpacific Migration and the Search for a Homeland, 1910-1960

  • Author: Julia María Schiavone Camacho
  • Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press
  • ISBN: 0807882593
  • Category: History
  • Page: 248
  • View: 7353
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At the turn of the twentieth century, a wave of Chinese men made their way to the northern Mexican border state of Sonora to work and live. The ties--and families--these Mexicans and Chinese created led to the formation of a new cultural identity: Chinese Mexican. During the tumult of the Mexican Revolution of 1910, however, anti-Chinese sentiment ultimately led to mass expulsion of these people. Julia Maria Schiavone Camacho follows the community through the mid-twentieth century, across borders and oceans, to show how they fought for their place as Mexicans, both in Mexico and abroad. Tracing transnational geography, Schiavone Camacho explores how these men and women developed a strong sense of Mexican national identity while living abroad--in the United States, briefly, and then in southeast Asia where they created a hybrid community and taught their children about the Mexican homeland. Schiavone Camacho also addresses how Mexican women challenged their legal status after being stripped of Mexican citizenship because they married Chinese men. After repatriation in the 1930s-1960s, Chinese Mexican men and women, who had left Mexico with strong regional identities, now claimed national cultural belonging and Mexican identity in ways they had not before.

Choreographing Asian America

Choreographing Asian America

  • Author: Yutian Wong
  • Publisher: Wesleyan University Press
  • ISBN: 0819571083
  • Category: Performing Arts
  • Page: 280
  • View: 1060
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Poised at the intersection of Asian American studies and dance studies, Choreographing Asian America is the first book-length examination of the role of Orientalist discourse in shaping Asian Americanist entanglements with U.S. modern dance history. Moving beyond the acknowledgement that modern dance has its roots in Orientalist appropriation, Yutian Wong considers the effect that invisible Orientalism has on the reception of work by Asian American choreographers and the conceptualization of Asian American performance as a category. Drawing on ethnographic and choreographic research methods, the author follows the work of Club O’ Noodles—a Vietnamese American performance ensemble—to understand how Asian American artists respond to competing narratives of representation, aesthetics, and social activism that often frame the production of Asian American performance.