Search Results for "mass-migration-to-modern-latin-america"

Mass Migration to Modern Latin America

Mass Migration to Modern Latin America

  • Author: Samuel L. Baily,Eduardo José Míguez
  • Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
  • ISBN: 9780842028318
  • Category: History
  • Page: 293
  • View: 5433
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It is well known that large numbers of Europeans migrated overseas during the century preceding the Great Depression of 1930, many of them to the United States. What is not well known is that more than 20 percent of these migrants emigrated to Latin America, significantly influencing the demographic, economic, and cultural evolution of many areas in the region. Mass Migration to Modern Latin America includes original contributions from more than a dozen leading scholars of the innovative new Latin American migration history that has emerged in the past 20 years. Though the authors focus primarily on the nature and impact of mass migration to Argentina and Brazil from 1870–1930, they place their analysis in broader historical and comparative contexts. Each section of the book begins with personal stories of individual immigrants and their families, providing students with a glimpse of how the complex process of migration played out in various situations. This book demonstrates the crucial impact of the mass migrations of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries on the formation of some Latin American societies.

Hispanic Spaces, Latino Places

Hispanic Spaces, Latino Places

Community and Cultural Diversity in Contemporary America

  • Author: Daniel Arreola
  • Publisher: University of Texas Press
  • ISBN: 029278399X
  • Category: History
  • Page: 344
  • View: 7862
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Hispanics/Latinos are the largest ethnic minority in the United States—but they are far from being a homogenous group. Mexican Americans in the Southwest have roots that extend back four centuries, while Dominicans and Salvadorans are very recent immigrants. Cuban Americans in South Florida have very different occupational achievements, employment levels, and income from immigrant Guatemalans who work in the poultry industry in Virginia. In fact, the only characteristic shared by all Hispanics/Latinos in the United States is birth or ancestry in a Spanish-speaking country. In this book, sixteen geographers and two sociologists map the regional and cultural diversity of the Hispanic/Latino population of the United States. They report on Hispanic communities in all sections of the country, showing how factors such as people's country/culture of origin, length of time in the United States, and relations with non-Hispanic society have interacted to create a wide variety of Hispanic communities. Identifying larger trends, they also discuss the common characteristics of three types of Hispanic communities—those that have always been predominantly Hispanic, those that have become Anglo-dominated, and those in which Hispanics are just becoming a significant portion of the population.

The Japanese in Latin America

The Japanese in Latin America

  • Author: Daniel M. Masterson,Sayaka Funada-Classen
  • Publisher: University of Illinois Press
  • ISBN: 9780252071447
  • Category: History
  • Page: 335
  • View: 2631
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"Japanese migration to Latin America began in the late nineteenth century, and today the continent is home to 1.5 million persons of Japanese descent. Combining detailed scholarship with rich personal histories, The Japanese in Latin America is the first comprehensive study of the patterns of Japanese migration on the continent as a whole. When the United States and Canada tightened their immigration restrictions in 1907, Japanese contract laborers began to arrive in mines and plantations in Latin America. Daniel M. Masterson, with the assistance of Sayaka Funada-Classen, examines Japanese agricultural colonies in Latin America, As well as the subsequent cultural networks that sprang up within and among them, And The changes that occurred as the Japanese moved from wage labor to ownership of farms and small businesses. Masterson also explores recent economic crises in Brazil, Argentina, and Peru, which combined with a strong Japanese economy to cause at least a quarter million Latin American Japanese to migrate back to Japan.Illuminating authoritative research with extensive interviews with migrants and their families, The Japanese in Latin America examines the dilemma of immigrants who maintained strong allegiances to their Japanese roots, even while they struggled to build lives in their new countries. "

Mass Migration to the United States

Mass Migration to the United States

Classical and Contemporary Periods

  • Author: Pyong Gap Min
  • Publisher: Rowman Altamira
  • ISBN: 9780759102323
  • Category: History
  • Page: 325
  • View: 3973
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During the mass migration period in the United States-between the years 1880 and 1930-an astounding 28 million people immigrated into the country. Min and his contributors offer a detailed evaluation of the differences and similarities between the immigrant groups from this earlier period and from the post-1965 contemporary period of immigration. In particular, they analyze trends in anti-immigrant attitudes and actions, changes in settlement patterns, entrepreneurship and business patterns, ethnic diversity, immigrant women's work, the intergenerational transmission of culture, and the naturalization process. The authors draw historical comparisons between the successive phases of immigration and the impact that they have had on evolving race relations in America. The book will be a valuable resource for instructors and researchers in the fields of immigration, race and ethnic studies, minorities and public policy, urban studies, ethnic history, demography, human geography, and sociology.

Expectations Unfulfilled: Norwegian Migrants in Latin America, 1820-1940

Expectations Unfulfilled: Norwegian Migrants in Latin America, 1820-1940

  • Author: N.A
  • Publisher: BRILL
  • ISBN: 9004307397
  • Category: Social Science
  • Page: 280
  • View: 9221
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In Expectations Unfulfilled scholars from Argentina, Belgium, Brazil, Mexico, Norway, Spain and Sweden study the experiences of Norwegian migrants in Latin America between the Wars of Independence and World War II.

Between Two Worlds

Between Two Worlds

Mexican Immigrants in the United States

  • Author: David Gregory Gutiérrez
  • Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
  • ISBN: 9780842024747
  • Category: Social Science
  • Page: 271
  • View: 1186
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This work explores the controversial issues surrounding the influx of Mexicans to America. Drawing on insights provoked by recent trends in immigration research, these 11 essays offer an overview of some of the more important interpretations of the dimensions of the Mexican diaspora.

Global Migration: Old Assumptions, New Dynamics [3 volumes]

Global Migration: Old Assumptions, New Dynamics [3 volumes]

  • Author: Diego Acosta Arcarazo,Anja Wiesbrock
  • Publisher: ABC-CLIO
  • ISBN: 1440804230
  • Category: Social Science
  • Page: 791
  • View: 2903
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This three-volume work exposes myths and debunks misinformation about global migration, an issue generating emotional debate from the highest levels of power to kitchen tables across the United States, Europe, and worldwide. • Offers the university student or interested lay reader a broad and accessible introduction to key questions on migration issues in 50 countries spanning 5 continents • Presents cutting-edge research drawn from the eight academic perspectives of law, economics, politics, sociology, demography, geography, anthropology, and history to allow the activist, journalist, or specialist to discuss the issues more thoroughly • Dispels numerous common myths surrounding migration, providing more depth and perspective than what is usually presented in the media • Supplies the broad scope, accessibility, and utility to serve nearly every audience, making this three-volume work an ideal choice for libraries seeking to purchase one reference work on immigration • View the introductory chapter of this book at http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2604184

Latin American Migrations to the U.S. Heartland

Latin American Migrations to the U.S. Heartland

Changing Social Landscapes in Middle America

  • Author: Linda Allegro,Andrew Grant Wood
  • Publisher: University of Illinois Press
  • ISBN: 0252094921
  • Category: Social Science
  • Page: 344
  • View: 1382
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Responding to inaccuracies concerning Latino immigrants in the United States as well as an anti-immigrant strain in the American psyche, this collection of essays examines the movement of the Latin American labor force to the central states of Oklahoma, Kansas, Nebraska, Arkansas, Missouri, and Iowa. Contributors look at the outside factors that affect migration including corporate agriculture, technology, globalization, and government, as well as factors that have attracted Latin Americans to the Heartland including religion, strong family values, hard work, farming, and cowboy culture. Several essays also point to hostile neoliberal policy reforms that have made it difficult for Latino Americans to find social and economic stability. The varied essays in Latin American Migrations to the U.S. Heartland seek to reveal the many ways in which identities, economies, and geographies are changing as Latin Americans adjust to their new homes, jobs, and communities. Contributors are Linda Allegro, Tisa M. Anders, Scott Carter, Caitlin Didier, Miranda Cady Hallett, Edmund Hamann, Albert Iaroi, Errol D. Jones, Jane Juffer, Laszlo J. Kulcsar, Janelle Reeves, Jennifer F. Reynolds, Sandi Smith-Nonini, and Andrew Grant Wood.

Latin America During World War II

Latin America During World War II

  • Author: Thomas M. Leonard,John F. Bratzel
  • Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
  • ISBN: 1461638623
  • Category: History
  • Page: 246
  • View: 6518
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The first full-length study of World War II from the Latin American perspective, this unique volume offers an in-depth analysis of the region during wartime. Each country responded to World War II according to its own national interests, which often conflicted with those of the Allies, including the United States. The contributors systematically consider how each country dealt with commonly shared problems: the Axis threat to the national order, the extent of military cooperation with the Allies, and the war's impact on the national economy and domestic political and social structures. Drawing on both U.S. and Latin American primary sources, the book offers a rigorous comparison of the wartime experiences of Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Central America, Gran Colombia, the Dominican Republic, Mexico, Panama, and Puerto Rico.

The Idea of Latin America

The Idea of Latin America

  • Author: Walter D. Mignolo
  • Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
  • ISBN: 1405150173
  • Category: History
  • Page: 224
  • View: 8871
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The Idea of Latin America is a geo-political manifesto which insists on the need to leave behind an idea which belonged to the nation-building mentality of nineteenth-century Europe. Charts the history of the concept of Latin America from its emergence in Europe in the second half of the nineteenth century through various permutations to the present day. Asks what is at stake in the survival of an idea which subdivides the Americas. Reinstates the indigenous peoples and migrations excluded by the image of a homogenous Latin America with defined borders. Insists on the pressing need to leave behind an idea which belonged to the nation-building mentality of nineteenth-century Europe.

The Age of Mass Migration

The Age of Mass Migration

Causes and Economic Impact

  • Author: Timothy J. Hatton,Jeffrey G. Williamson
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press
  • ISBN: 9780195353792
  • Category: Business & Economics
  • Page: 320
  • View: 1961
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About 55 million Europeans migrated to the New World between 1850 and 1914, landing in North and South America and in Australia. This mass migration marked a profound shift in the distribution of global population and economic activity. In this book, Timothy J. Hatton and Jeffrey G. Williamson describe the migration and analyze its causes and effects. Their study offers a comprehensive treatment of a vital period in the modern economic development of the Western world. Moreover, it explores questions that we still debate today: Why does a nation's emigration rate typically rise with early industrialization? How do immigrants choose their destinations? Are international labor markets segmented? Do immigrants "rob" jobs from locals? What impact do migrants have on living standards in the host and sending countries? Did mass migration make an important contribution to the catching-up of poor countries on rich? Did it create a globalization backlash? This work takes a new view of mass migration. Although often bold and controversial in method, it is the first to assign an explicitly economic interpretation to this important social phenomenon. The Age of Mass Migration will be useful to all students of migration, and to anyone interested in economic growth and globalization.

Telling Migrant Stories

Telling Migrant Stories

Latin American Diaspora in Documentary Film

  • Author: Esteban Loustaunau,Lauren E. Shaw
  • Publisher: Reframing Media, Technology, a
  • ISBN: 9781683400233
  • Category: History
  • Page: 336
  • View: 4035
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This book is a collection of edited theoretical essays on the power of contemporary documentary film to voice the social agency of Latin American immigrants to the United States and Europe, and to reveal some of the global systemic conditions that generate mass migrations and lead to the dehumanization of undocumented immigrants. Linking the function of documentary to represent immigrants as performing agents whose voices generally are not heard publicly, this volume also features interviews with prominent documentarians whose films and videos respond to conditions of migration from a variety of perspectives.

The Sea and Civilization

The Sea and Civilization

A Maritime History of the World

  • Author: Lincoln Paine
  • Publisher: Vintage
  • ISBN: 0307962253
  • Category: History
  • Page: 784
  • View: 960
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A monumental retelling of world history through the lens of maritime enterprise, revealing in breathtaking depth how people first came into contact with one another by ocean and river, lake and stream, and how goods, languages, religions, and entire cultures spread across and along the world’s waterways, bringing together civilizations and defining what makes us most human. Lincoln Paine takes us back to the origins of long-distance migration by sea with our ancestors’ first forays from Africa and Eurasia to Australia and the Americas. He demonstrates the critical role of maritime trade to the civilizations of ancient Egypt, Mesopotamia, and the Indus Valley. He reacquaints us with the great seafaring cultures of antiquity like those of the Phoenicians and Greeks, as well as those of India and Southeast and East Asia, who parlayed their navigational skills, shipbuilding techniques, and commercial acumen to establish thriving overseas colonies and trade routes in the centuries leading up to the age of European expansion. And finally, his narrative traces how commercial shipping and naval warfare brought about the enormous demographic, cultural, and political changes that have globalized the world throughout the post–Cold War era. This tremendously readable intellectual adventure shows us the world in a new light, in which the sea reigns supreme. We find out how a once-enslaved East African king brought Islam to his people, what the American “sail-around territories” were, and what the Song Dynasty did with twenty-wheel, human-powered paddleboats with twenty paddle wheels and up to three hundred crew. Above all, Paine makes clear how the rise and fall of civilizations can be linked to the sea. An accomplishment of both great sweep and illuminating detail, The Sea and Civilization is a stunning work of history.

Dancing with Dynamite

Dancing with Dynamite

Social Movements and States in Latin America

  • Author: Benjamin Dangl
  • Publisher: AK Press
  • ISBN: 1849350469
  • Category: Political Science
  • Page: 160
  • View: 1213
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Grassroots social movements played a major role electing left-leaning governments throughout Latin America. Subsequent relations between these states and "the streets" remain troubled. Contextualizing recent developments historically, Dangl untangles the contradictions of state-focused social change, providing lessons for activists everywhere.

Latin American Social Movements

Latin American Social Movements

Globalization, Democratization, and Transnational Networks

  • Author: Hank Johnston,Paul Almeida
  • Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
  • ISBN: 9780742553323
  • Category: Political Science
  • Page: 270
  • View: 4204
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The two current trends of democratization and deepening economic liberalization have made Latin American countries a ground for massive defensive mobilization campaigns and have created new sites of popular struggle. In this edited volume on Latin American social movements, original chapters are combined with peer-reviewed articles from the well-regarded journal Mobilization. Each section represents a major theme in Latin American social movement research. Original chapters discuss the Madres de Plaza de Mayo movement in Argentina and the Zapatista movement in Chiapas, Mexico. Also included in the book's coverage of the region's major movements are los piqueteros and antisweatshop labor organizing. This is the first study to focus closely on the related issues of neoliberal globalization, democratization, and the workings of transnational advocacy networks in Latin America.

Exodus

Exodus

How Migration is Changing Our World

  • Author: Paul Collier
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
  • ISBN: 0195398653
  • Category: Business & Economics
  • Page: 309
  • View: 4313
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The best-selling author of The Bottom Billion lays out the effects of both encouraging and restricting migration.

The Great Departure: Mass Migration from Eastern Europe and the Making of the Free World

The Great Departure: Mass Migration from Eastern Europe and the Making of the Free World

  • Author: Tara Zahra
  • Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
  • ISBN: 0393285596
  • Category: History
  • Page: 320
  • View: 8191
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“With a combination of deft historical analysis, sparkling prose, and careful attention to individual stories, both poignant and instructive, The Great Departure is brimming with important and suggestive lessons from the past for thinking about the worldwide dynamics of emigrants and refugees in our own day.”—Norman M. Naimark, Stanford University Between 1846 and 1940, more than 50 million Europeans moved to the Americas, irrevocably changing both their new homes and the ones they left behind. In this groundbreaking study, Tara Zahra explores the deeper story of this astonishing movement of people—one of the largest in human history. The great exodus out of Eastern Europe hollowed out villages with dizzying speed. As villages emptied and the fear of depopulation ran rampant, anxiety over “American fever” prevailed, leading to the scapegoating of Jewish emigration agents. Yet others saw vast opportunity: to seed colonies of migrants like the Polish community in Argentina, to gain economic advantage from an inflow of foreign currency, or to reshape their communities in a new land. In the United States, their migration fostered the notion of the “land of the free.” Globally, the policies that gave shape to this migration provided the precedent for future events such as the Holocaust, the closing of the Iron Curtain, and the tragedies of ethnic cleansing. A sweeping history of the most consequential social phenomenon of the twentieth century, The Great Departure gives poignant attention to the individuals whose lives were transformed by these decades of mass departure, and a keen historical perspective on their continuing legacy.

Immigration and the Next America

Immigration and the Next America

Renewing the Soul of Our Nation

  • Author: Archbishop Jose H. Gomez
  • Publisher: Our Sunday Visitor
  • ISBN: 1612783392
  • Category: Religion
  • Page: 128
  • View: 9049
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Archbishop José Gomez has written a personal, passionate and practical contribution to the national debate about immigration - pointing the way toward a recovery of America's highest ideals. "Immigration is a human rights test of our generation. It's also a defining historical moment for America. The meaning of this hour is that we need to renew our country in the image of her founding promises of universal rights rooted in God. Immigration is about more than immigration. It's about renewing the soul of America."- Archbishop José H. Gomez Archbishop José H. Gomez is one of the leading moral voices in the American Catholic Church. He is the Archbishop of Los Angeles, the nation's largest Catholic community and the Chairman of the United States Catholic Bishops' Committee on Migration and a papal appointee to the Pontifical Commission for Latin America. Archbishop Gomez is a native of Monterrey, Mexico and a naturalized American citizen.

Migrants and Migration in Modern North America

Migrants and Migration in Modern North America

Cross-Border Lives, Labor Markets, and Politics

  • Author: Dirk Hoerder,Nora Faires
  • Publisher: Duke University Press Books
  • ISBN: 9780822350347
  • Category: History
  • Page: 456
  • View: 3744
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Presenting an unprecedented, integrated view of migration in North America, this interdisciplinary collection of essays illuminates the movements of people within and between Canada, the Caribbean, Mexico, and the United States over the past two centuries. Several essays discuss recent migrations from Central America as well. In the introduction, Dirk Hoerder provides a sweeping historical overview of North American societies in the Atlantic world. He also develops and advocates what he and Nora Faires call “transcultural societal studies,” an interdisciplinary approach to migration studies that combines migration research across disciplines and at the local, regional, national, and transnational levels. The contributors examine the movements of diverse populations across North America in relation to changing cultural, political, and economic patterns. They describe the ways that people have fashioned cross-border lives, as well as the effects of shifting labor markets in facilitating or hindering cross-border movement, the place of formal and informal politics in migration processes and migrants’ lives, and the creation and transformation of borderlands economies, societies, and cultures. This collection offers rich new perspectives on migration in North America and on the broader study of migration history. Contributors Jaime R. Aguila Rodolfo Casillas-R. Nora Faires Maria Cristina Garcia Delia Gonzáles de Reufels Brian Gratton Susan E. Gray James N. Gregory John Mason Hart Dirk Hoerder Dan Killoren Sarah-Jane (Saje) Mathieu Catherine O’Donnell Kerry Preibisch Lara Putnam Bruno Ramirez Angelika Sauer Melanie Shell-Weiss Yukari Takai Omar S. Valerio-Jiménez Carlos G. Vélez-Ibáñez