Search Results for "medieval-foundations-of-international-relations"

Medieval Foundations of International Relations

Medieval Foundations of International Relations

  • Author: William Bain
  • Publisher: Routledge
  • ISBN: 1317635493
  • Category: Political Science
  • Page: 210
  • View: 1740
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The purpose of this volume is to explore the medieval inheritance of modern international relations. Recent years have seen a flourishing of work on the history of international political thought, but the bulk of this has focused on the early modern and modern periods, leaving continuities with the medieval world largely ignored. The medieval is often used as a synonym for the barbaric and obsolete, yet this picture does not match that found in relevant work in the history of political thought. The book thus offers a chance to correct this misconception of the evolution of Western international thought, highlighting that the history of international thought should be regarded as an important dimension of thinking about the international and one that should not be consigned to history departments. Questions addressed include: what is the medieval influence on modern conception of rights, law, and community? how have medieval ideas shaped modern conceptions of self-determination, consent, and legitimacy? are there ‘medieval’ answers to ‘modern’ questions? is the modern world still working its way through the Middle Ages? to what extent is the ‘modern outlook’ genuinely secular? is there a ‘theology’ of international relations? what are the implications of continuity for predominant historical narrative of the emergence and expansion of international society? Medieval and modern are certainly different; however, this collection of essays proceeds from the conviction that the modern world was not built on a new plot with new building materials. Instead, it was constructed out of the rubble, that is, the raw materials, of the Middle Ages.This will be of great interest to students and scholars of IR, IR theory and political theory. .

Medieval Foundations of International Relations

Medieval Foundations of International Relations

  • Author: William Bain
  • Publisher: Routledge
  • ISBN: 1317635507
  • Category: Political Science
  • Page: 196
  • View: 8584
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The purpose of this volume is to explore the medieval inheritance of modern international relations. Recent years have seen a flourishing of work on the history of international political thought, but the bulk of this has focused on the early modern and modern periods, leaving continuities with the medieval world largely ignored. The medieval is often used as a synonym for the barbaric and obsolete, yet this picture does not match that found in relevant work in the history of political thought. The book thus offers a chance to correct this misconception of the evolution of Western international thought, highlighting that the history of international thought should be regarded as an important dimension of thinking about the international and one that should not be consigned to history departments. Questions addressed include: what is the medieval influence on modern conception of rights, law, and community? how have medieval ideas shaped modern conceptions of self-determination, consent, and legitimacy? are there ‘medieval’ answers to ‘modern’ questions? is the modern world still working its way through the Middle Ages? to what extent is the ‘modern outlook’ genuinely secular? is there a ‘theology’ of international relations? what are the implications of continuity for predominant historical narrative of the emergence and expansion of international society? Medieval and modern are certainly different; however, this collection of essays proceeds from the conviction that the modern world was not built on a new plot with new building materials. Instead, it was constructed out of the rubble, that is, the raw materials, of the Middle Ages.This will be of great interest to students and scholars of IR, IR theory and political theory. .

Medieval Foundations of International Relations

Medieval Foundations of International Relations

  • Author: Lecturer in International Politics William Bain,William Bain
  • Publisher: N.A
  • ISBN: 9781138795792
  • Category: Political Science
  • Page: 224
  • View: 974
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The purpose of this volume is to explore the medieval inheritance of modern international relations. Recent years have seen a flourishing of work on the history of international political thought, but the bulk of this has focused on the early modern and modern periods, leaving continuities with the medieval world largely ignored. The medieval is often used as a synonym for the barbaric and obsolete, yet this picture does not match that found in relevant work in the history of political thought. The book thus offers a chance to correct this misconception of the evolution of Western international thought, highlighting that the history of international thought should be regarded as an important dimension of thinking about the international and one that should not be consigned to history departments. Questions addressed include: what is the medieval influence on modern conception of rights, law, and community? how have medieval ideas shaped modern conceptions of self-determination, consent, and legitimacy? are there 'medieval' answers to 'modern' questions? is the modern world still working its way through the Middle Ages? to what extent is the 'modern outlook' genuinely secular? is there a 'theology' of international relations? what are the implications of continuity for predominant historical narrative of the emergence and expansion of international society? Medieval and modern are certainly different; however, this collection of essays proceeds from the conviction that the modern world was not built on a new plot with new building materials. Instead, it was constructed out of the rubble, that is, the raw materials, of the Middle Ages.This will be of great interest to students and scholars of IR, IR theory and political theory. .

foundations of the conciliar theory

foundations of the conciliar theory

  • Author: Brian Tierney
  • Publisher: CUP Archive
  • ISBN: N.A
  • Category: Canon law
  • Page: 280
  • View: 5719
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Medieval Foundations of the Western Intellectual Tradition, 400-1400

Medieval Foundations of the Western Intellectual Tradition, 400-1400

  • Author: Marcia L. Colish
  • Publisher: Yale University Press
  • ISBN: 9780300078527
  • Category: History
  • Page: 388
  • View: 6793
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An analysis of the course of Western intellectual history between A.D. 400 and 1400, this book is divided into two parts: the first surveys the comparative modes of thought and varying success of Byzantine, Latin-Christian and Muslim cultures, and the second takes readers from the 11th century revival of learning to the high Middle Ages and beyond, the period in which the vibrancy of Western intellectual culture enabled it to stamp its imprint well beyond the frontiers of Christendom. 24 illustrations.

History of International Relations Theory

History of International Relations Theory

  • Author: Torbjorn L. Knutsen
  • Publisher: Manchester University Press
  • ISBN: 9780719049309
  • Category: Political Science
  • Page: 354
  • View: 1500
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Torbjorn L. Knutsen introduces ideas on international relations expressed by thinkers from the High Middle Ages to the present day, and traces the developments of four ever-present themes: war, wealth, peace and power. The book counters the assumption that international relations has no theoretical tradition and shows that scholars, soldiers and statesmen have been speculating about the subject for the last 700 years. Beginning with the roots of the state and the concept of sovereignty in the Middle Ages, the author draws upon the insights of outstanding political thinkers. Clearly and succinctly the theories of Aquinas, Machiavelli, Hegel, Rousseau, Bentham, Marx and Lenin amongst others are discussed and analysed. The ideas of these thinkers are placed in context with the societies and intellectual ideas that produced them. The text is fully revised and updated to include the place of international relations after the Cold War and new ways of thinking opened up by developments in information technology.

Medieval Law and the Foundations of the State

Medieval Law and the Foundations of the State

  • Author: Alan Harding
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand
  • ISBN: 019821958X
  • Category: Law
  • Page: 392
  • View: 8932
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The state is the most powerful and contested of political ideas, loved for its promise of order but hated for its threat of coercion. In this broad-ranging new study, Alan Harding challenges the orthodoxy that there was no state in the Middle Ages, arguing instead that it was precisely then that the concept acquired its force. He explores how the word 'state' was used by medieval rulers and their ministers and connects the growth of the idea of the state with the development of systemsfor the administration of justice and the enforcement of peace. He shows how these systems provided new models for government from the centre, successfully in France and England but less so in Germany. The courts and legislation of French and English kings are described establishing public order, defining rights to property and liberty, and structuring commonwealths by 'estates'. In the final chapters the author reveals how the concept of the state was taken up by political commentators inthe wars of the later Middle Ages and the Reformation Period, and how the law-based 'state of the king and the kingdom' was transformed into the politically dynamic 'modern state'.

Empress Adelheid and Countess Matilda

Empress Adelheid and Countess Matilda

Medieval Female Rulership and the Foundations of European Society

  • Author: Penelope Nash
  • Publisher: Springer
  • ISBN: 1137585145
  • Category: History
  • Page: 268
  • View: 8375
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This book compares two successful, elite women, Empress Adelheid (931-999) and Countess Matilda (1046-1115), for their relative ability to retain their wealth and power in the midst of the profound social changes of the eleventh century. The careers of the Ottonian queen and empress Adelheid and Countess Matilda of Tuscany reveal a growth of opportunities for women to access wealth and power. These two women are analyzed under three categories: their relationships with family and friends, how they managed their property (particularly land), and how they ruled. This analysis encourages a better understanding of gender relations in both the past and the present.

The Cambridge History of Medieval Political Thought C.350-c.1450

The Cambridge History of Medieval Political Thought C.350-c.1450

  • Author: J. H. Burns,James Henderson Burns
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press
  • ISBN: 9780521423885
  • Category: History
  • Page: 808
  • View: 7591
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This volume examines the history of a complex and varied body of ideas over a period of more than a thousand years.

The Government of Philip Augustus

The Government of Philip Augustus

Foundations of French Royal Power in the Middle Ages

  • Author: John W. Baldwin
  • Publisher: Univ of California Press
  • ISBN: 0520073916
  • Category: History
  • Page: 611
  • View: 4961
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In the thirteenth century the French kings won ascendancy over France, while France achieved political and cultural supremacy over western Europe. Based on French sources, this meticulously documented study provides an account of how Philip Augustus (1179-1223) brought about this transformation of royal power.

The Foundations of International Investment Law

The Foundations of International Investment Law

Bringing Theory Into Practice

  • Author: Zachary Douglas,Joost Pauwelyn,Jorge E. Viñuales
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press
  • ISBN: 019968538X
  • Category: Law
  • Page: 541
  • View: 1198
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Bringing together conceptual theories of international investment law with the practical application of the law in treaty arbitration, this book investigates the key controversies in the field. It provides a detailed examination of how a different theoretical approach would have led to a different outcome in a number of important arbitral awards.

Economic Foundations of International Law

Economic Foundations of International Law

  • Author: Eric A. Posner,A. O Sykes
  • Publisher: Harvard University Press
  • ISBN: 0674067630
  • Category: Law
  • Page: 374
  • View: 6934
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Exchange of goods and ideas among nations, cross-border pollution, global warming, and international crime pose formidable questions for international law. Two respected scholars provide an intellectual framework for assessing these problems from a rational choice perspective and describe conditions under which international law succeeds or fails.

Foundations of Modern International Thought

Foundations of Modern International Thought

  • Author: David Armitage
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press
  • ISBN: 0521807077
  • Category: History
  • Page: 300
  • View: 4142
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This insightful and wide-ranging volume traces the genesis of international intellectual thought, connecting international and global history with intellectual history.

Arts of the Medieval Cathedrals

Arts of the Medieval Cathedrals

Studies on Architecture, Stained Glass and Sculpture in Honor of Anne Prache

  • Author: Kathleen Nolan,Dany Sandron
  • Publisher: Routledge
  • ISBN: 1351956892
  • Category: Art
  • Page: 314
  • View: 6882
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The touchstones of Gothic monumental art in France - the abbey church of Saint-Denis and the cathedrals of Chartres, Reims, and Bourges - form the core of this collection dedicated to the memory of Anne Prache. The essays reflect the impact of Prache’s career, both as a scholar of wide-ranging interests and as a builder of bridges between the French and American academic communities. Thus the authors include scholars in France and the United States, both academics and museum professionals, while the thematic matrix of the book, divided into architecture, stained glass, and sculpture, reflects the multiple media explored by Prache during her long career. The essays employ a varied range of methodologies to explore Gothic monuments. The chapters in the architectural section include an intensive archeological analysis of the foundations of Reims Cathedral, the close reading of a late medieval literary text for a symbolic understanding of Paris, and essays that explore the medieval use of practical geometry in designing entire buildings and their components. Saint-Denis, Reims, and Chartres, all monuments studied by Prache, are discussed in the next part, on stained glass. These chapters demonstrate how old problems can be clarified by new evidence, whether from the accessibility of previously unknown archival information, for Reims, or through revelations that arise from restoration, at Chartres. These essays also include a study showing the complexity of making attributions for the storied glass of Saint-Denis. The final set of essays likewise takes different approaches to sculpture, whether constructing links to the liturgy at Reims, or discussing the meaning of a sculptural ensemble studied by Prache early in her career, the cloister of Notre-Dame-en-Vaux in Châlons-en-Champagne, or scrupulously examining the façade sculpture at Bourges Cathedral for insights into the design process. As a whole, the volume provides a window onto key directions in the study of

The Weimar Century

The Weimar Century

German Emigres and the Ideological Foundations of the Cold War

  • Author: Udi Greenberg
  • Publisher: Princeton University Press
  • ISBN: 1400852390
  • Category: History
  • Page: 288
  • View: 6079
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The Weimar Century reveals the origins of two dramatic events: Germany's post–World War II transformation from a racist dictatorship to a liberal democracy, and the ideological genesis of the Cold War. Blending intellectual, political, and international histories, Udi Greenberg shows that the foundations of Germany’s reconstruction lay in the country’s first democratic experiment, the Weimar Republic (1918–33). He traces the paths of five crucial German émigrés who participated in Weimar’s intense political debates, spent the Nazi era in the United States, and then rebuilt Europe after a devastating war. Examining the unexpected stories of these diverse individuals—Protestant political thinker Carl J. Friedrich, Socialist theorist Ernst Fraenkel, Catholic publicist Waldemar Gurian, liberal lawyer Karl Loewenstein, and international relations theorist Hans Morgenthau—Greenberg uncovers the intellectual and political forces that forged Germany’s democracy after dictatorship, war, and occupation. In restructuring German thought and politics, these émigrés also shaped the currents of the early Cold War. Having borne witness to Weimar’s political clashes and violent upheavals, they called on democratic regimes to permanently mobilize their citizens and resources in global struggle against their Communist enemies. In the process, they gained entry to the highest levels of American power, serving as top-level advisors to American occupation authorities in Germany and Korea, consultants for the State Department in Latin America, and leaders in universities and philanthropic foundations across Europe and the United States. Their ideas became integral to American global hegemony. From interwar Germany to the dawn of the American century, The Weimar Century sheds light on the crucial ideas, individuals, and politics that made the trans-Atlantic postwar order.

The Expansion of Central Europe in the Middle Ages

The Expansion of Central Europe in the Middle Ages

  • Author: Nora Berend
  • Publisher: Routledge
  • ISBN: 1351890085
  • Category: History
  • Page: 544
  • View: 2013
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This volume brings together a set of key studies on the history of medieval Central Europe (Bohemia, Hungary, Poland), along with others specially commissioned for the book or translated, and a new introduction. This region was both an area of immigration, and one of polities in expansion. Such expansion included the settlement and exploitation of previously empty lands as well as rulers' attempts to incorporate new territories under their rule, although these attempts did not always succeed. Often, German immigration has been prioritized in scholarship, and the medieval expansion of Central Europe has been equated with the expansion of Germans. Debates then focused on the positive or negative contribution of Germans to local life, and the consequences of their settlement. This perspective, however, distorts our understanding of medieval processes. On the one hand, Central Europe was not a passive recipient of immigrants. Local rulers and eventually nobles benefited from and encouraged immigration; they played an active role. On the other hand, German immigration was not a unified movement, and cannot be equated with a drang nach osten. Finally, not just Germans, but also various Romance-speaking and other immigrant groups settled in Central Europe. This volume, therefore, seeks to present a more complex picture of medieval expansion in Central Europe.

Medieval Monasticism

Medieval Monasticism

Forms of Religious Life in Western Europe in the Middle Ages

  • Author: C.H. Lawrence
  • Publisher: Routledge
  • ISBN: 1317504682
  • Category: History
  • Page: 300
  • View: 9609
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Medieval Monasticism traces the Western Monastic tradition from its fourth century origins in the deserts of Egypt and Syria, through the many and varied forms of religious life it assumed during the Middle Ages. Hugh Lawrence explores the many sided relationship between monasteries and the secular world around them. For a thousand years, the great monastic houses and religious orders were a prominent feature of the social landscape of the West, and their leaders figured as much in the political as on the spiritual map of the medieval world. In this book many of them, together with their supporters and critics, are presented to us and speak their minds to us. We are shown, for instance, the controversy between the Benedictines and the reformed monasticism of the twelfth century and the problems that confronted women in religious life. A detailed glossary offers readers a helpful vocabulary of the subject. This book is essential reading for both students and scholars of the medieval world.

Philosophical Foundations of Human Rights

Philosophical Foundations of Human Rights

  • Author: Rowan Cruft,S. Matthew Liao,Massimo Renzo
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press
  • ISBN: 0199688621
  • Category: Law
  • Page: 650
  • View: 6363
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Readership: This book would be suitable for students, academics and scholars of law, philosophy, politics, international relations and economics

Reading the Bible in the Middle Ages

Reading the Bible in the Middle Ages

  • Author: Jinty Nelson,Damien Kempf
  • Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing
  • ISBN: 1474245730
  • Category: History
  • Page: 288
  • View: 1649
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For earlier medieval Christians, the Bible was the book of guidance above all others, and the route to religious knowledge, used for all kinds of practical purposes, from divination to models of government in kingdom or household. This book's focus is on how medieval people accessed Scripture by reading, but also by hearing and memorizing sound-bites from the liturgy, chants and hymns, or sermons explicating Scripture in various vernaculars. Time, place and social class determined access to these varied forms of Scripture. Throughout the earlier medieval period, the Psalms attracted most readers and searchers for meanings. This book's contributors probe readers' motivations, intellectual resources and religious concerns. They ask for whom the readers wrote, where they expected their readers to be located and in what institutional, social and political environments they belonged; why writers chose to write about, or draw on, certain parts of the Bible rather than others, and what real-life contexts or conjunctures inspired them; why the Old Testament so often loomed so large, and how its law-books, its histories, its prophetic books and its poetry were made intelligible to readers, hearers and memorizers. This book's contributors, in raising so many questions, do justice to both uniqueness and diversity.

Living Together, Living Apart

Living Together, Living Apart

Rethinking Jewish-Christian Relations in the Middle Ages

  • Author: Jonathan Elukin
  • Publisher: Princeton University Press
  • ISBN: 9781400827695
  • Category: History
  • Page: 208
  • View: 4072
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This book challenges the standard conception of the Middle Ages as a time of persecution for Jews. Jonathan Elukin traces the experience of Jews in Europe from late antiquity through the Renaissance and Reformation, revealing how the pluralism of medieval society allowed Jews to feel part of their local communities despite recurrent expressions of hatred against them. Elukin shows that Jews and Christians coexisted more or less peacefully for much of the Middle Ages, and that the violence directed at Jews was largely isolated and did not undermine their participation in the daily rhythms of European society. The extraordinary picture that emerges is one of Jews living comfortably among their Christian neighbors, working with Christians, and occasionally cultivating lasting friendships even as Christian culture often demonized Jews. As Elukin makes clear, the expulsions of Jews from England, France, Spain, and elsewhere were not the inevitable culmination of persecution, but arose from the religious and political expediencies of particular rulers. He demonstrates that the history of successful Jewish-Christian interaction in the Middle Ages in fact laid the social foundations that gave rise to the Jewish communities of modern Europe. Elukin compels us to rethink our assumptions about this fascinating period in history, offering us a new lens through which to appreciate the rich complexities of the Jewish experience in medieval Christendom.