Search Results for "medieval-foundations-of-the-western-intellectual-tradition-400-1400"

Medieval Foundations of the Western Intellectual Tradition, 400-1400

Medieval Foundations of the Western Intellectual Tradition, 400-1400

  • Author: Marcia L. Colish
  • Publisher: Yale University Press
  • ISBN: 9780300078527
  • Category: History
  • Page: 388
  • View: 8476
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An analysis of the course of Western intellectual history between A.D. 400 and 1400, this book is divided into two parts: the first surveys the comparative modes of thought and varying success of Byzantine, Latin-Christian and Muslim cultures, and the second takes readers from the 11th century revival of learning to the high Middle Ages and beyond, the period in which the vibrancy of Western intellectual culture enabled it to stamp its imprint well beyond the frontiers of Christendom. 24 illustrations.

Medieval Foundations of the Western Intellectual Tradition, 400-1400

Medieval Foundations of the Western Intellectual Tradition, 400-1400

  • Author: Marcia L. Colish
  • Publisher: N.A
  • ISBN: 9780300071429
  • Category: History
  • Page: 388
  • View: 3393
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An analysis of the course of Western intellectual history between A.D. 400 and 1400, this book is divided into two parts: the first surveys the comparative modes of thought and varying success of Byzantine, Latin-Christian and Muslim cultures, and the second takes readers from the 11th century revival of learning to the high Middle Ages and beyond, the period in which the vibrancy of Western intellectual culture enabled it to stamp its imprint well beyond the frontiers of Christendom. 24 illustrations.

Women in Western Intellectual Culture, 600–1500

Women in Western Intellectual Culture, 600–1500

  • Author: P. Ranft
  • Publisher: Springer
  • ISBN: 0230108253
  • Category: Social Science
  • Page: 279
  • View: 4410
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Western intellectual tradition has long been viewed as an exclusive male bastion, but Women in Western Intellectual Culture, 600-1500 proves that this thesis is no longer tenable. By identifying and analyzing the intellectual writings and activities of women throughout the centuries this study, the first of two volumes, documents a level of participation in intellectual matters that will surprise many readers. The quality and quantity of these contributions show that women's voices deserve more attention in intellectual history.

The Waning of the Renaissance, 1550-1640

The Waning of the Renaissance, 1550-1640

  • Author: William James Bouwsma
  • Publisher: Yale University Press
  • ISBN: 9780300097177
  • Category: History
  • Page: 288
  • View: 7854
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Historians have conventionally viewed intellectual and artistic achievement as a seamless progression in a single direction, with the Renaissance, as identified by Jacob Burckhardt, as the root and foundation of modern culture. But in this brilliant new analysis William Bouwsma rethinks the accepted view, arguing that while the Renaissance had a beginning and, unquestionably, a climax, it also had an ending. Examining the careers of some of the greatest figures of the age - Montaigne, Galileo, Jonson, Descartes, Hooker, Shakespeare, and Cervantes among many others - Bouwsma perceives in their work a growing sense of doubt and anxiety about the modern world. He considers first those features of modern European culture generally associated with the traditional Renaissance, features which reached their climax in the late sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries. But even as the movements of the Renaissance gathered strength, simultaneous impulses operated in a contrary direction. Bouwsma identifies a growing concern with personal identity, shifts in the interests of major thinkers, a decline in confidence about the future, and a heightening of anxiety.

Early Medieval Philosophy 480-1150

Early Medieval Philosophy 480-1150

An Introduction

  • Author: John Marenbon
  • Publisher: Routledge
  • ISBN: 1134989636
  • Category: Philosophy
  • Page: 216
  • View: 3455
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Compact but singularly well thought out material of a theological, logical, poetic as well as philosophical nature.

The Crisis of Reason

The Crisis of Reason

European Thought, 1848-1914

  • Author: John Wyon Burrow
  • Publisher: Yale University Press
  • ISBN: 9780300097184
  • Category: History
  • Page: 271
  • View: 4783
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Burrow examines the impact of science and social thought on European intellectual life prior to World War I. He considers ideas in physics, social evolution and social Darwinism, and anxieties about modernity and personal identity.

The Coming of the Book

The Coming of the Book

The Impact of Printing 1450-1800

  • Author: Lucien Febvre,Henri-Jean Martin
  • Publisher: Verso
  • ISBN: 9781859841082
  • Category: History
  • Page: 378
  • View: 8369
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Books, and the printed word more generally, are aspects of modern life that are all too often taken for granted. Yet the emergence of the book was a process of immense historical importance and heralded the dawning of the epoch of modernity. In this much praised history of that process, Lucien Febvre and Henri-Jean Martin mesh together economic and technological history, sociology and anthropology, as well as the study of modes of consciousness, to root the development of the printed word in the changing social relations and ideological struggles of Western Europe.

Witchcraft in the Middle Ages

Witchcraft in the Middle Ages

  • Author: Jeffrey Burton Russell
  • Publisher: Cornell University Press
  • ISBN: 9780801492891
  • Category: History
  • Page: 394
  • View: 9835
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Traces the origin, development and practice of medieval witchcraft throughout western Europe, and describes the movement's social and religious significance

Plague Ports

Plague Ports

The Global Urban Impact of Bubonic Plague,1894-1901

  • Author: Myron Echenberg
  • Publisher: NYU Press
  • ISBN: 0814722326
  • Category: History
  • Page: 347
  • View: 1927
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The Assemblies of God (AG) is the ninth largest American and the world’s largest Pentecostal denomination, with over 50 million followers worldwide. The AG embraces a worldview of miracles and mystery that makes“supernatural” experiences, such as speaking in tongues, healing, and prophecy, normal for Christian believers. Ever since it first organized in 1916, however, the “charismata” or “gifts of the Holy Spirit” have felt tension from institutional forces. Over the decades, vital charismatic experiences have been increasingly tamed by rituals, doctrine, and denominational structure. Yet the path towards institutionalization has not been clear-cut. New revivals and direct personal experience of God—the hallmarks of Pentecostalism—continue as an important part of the AG tradition, particularly in the growing number of ethnic congregations in the United States. The Assemblies of God draws on fresh, up-to-date research including quantitative surveys and interviews from twenty-two diverse Assemblies of God congregations to offer a new sociological portrait of the AG for the new millennium. The authors suggest that there is indeed a potential revitalization of the movement in the works within the context of the larger global Pentecostal upswing, and that this revitalization may be spurred by what the authors call “godly love:” the dynamic interaction between divine and human love that enlivens and expands benevolence. The volume provides a wealth of data about how the second-largest American Pentecostal denomination sees itself today, and suggests trends to illuminate where it is headed in the future.

The Cambridge History of Medieval Political Thought C.350-c.1450

The Cambridge History of Medieval Political Thought C.350-c.1450

  • Author: J. H. Burns,James Henderson Burns
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press
  • ISBN: 9780521423885
  • Category: History
  • Page: 808
  • View: 9785
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This volume examines the history of a complex and varied body of ideas over a period of more than a thousand years.

God's Philosophers

God's Philosophers

How the Medieval World Laid the Foundations of Modern Science

  • Author: James Hannam
  • Publisher: Icon Books Ltd
  • ISBN: 1848311583
  • Category: History
  • Page: 432
  • View: 3264
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This is a powerful and a thrilling narrative history revealing the roots of modern science in the medieval world. The adjective 'medieval' has become a synonym for brutality and uncivilized behavior. Yet without the work of medieval scholars there could have been no Galileo, no Newton and no Scientific Revolution. In "God's Philosophers", James Hannam debunks many of the myths about the Middle Ages, showing that medieval people did not think the earth is flat, nor did Columbus 'prove' that it is a sphere; the Inquisition burnt nobody for their science nor was Copernicus afraid of persecution; no Pope tried to ban human dissection or the number zero. "God's Philosophers" is a celebration of the forgotten scientific achievements of the Middle Ages - advances which were often made thanks to, rather than in spite of, the influence of Christianity and Islam. Decisive progress was also made in technology: spectacles and the mechanical clock, for instance, were both invented in thirteenth-century Europe. Charting an epic journey through six centuries of history, "God's Philosophers" brings back to light the discoveries of neglected geniuses like John Buridan, Nicole Oresme and Thomas Bradwardine, as well as putting into context the contributions of more familiar figures like Roger Bacon, William of Ockham and Saint Thomas Aquinas.

The Genesis of Science

The Genesis of Science

How the Christian Middle Ages Launched the Scientific Revolution

  • Author: James Hannam
  • Publisher: Simon and Schuster
  • ISBN: 1596982055
  • Category: History
  • Page: 448
  • View: 2378
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The Not-So-Dark Dark Ages What they forgot to teach you in school: People in the Middle Ages did not think the world was flat The Inquisition never executed anyone because of their scientific ideologies It was medieval scientific discoveries, including various methods, that made possible Western civilization’s “Scientific Revolution” As a physicist and historian of science James Hannam debunks myths of the Middle Ages in his brilliant book The Genesis of Science: How the Christian Middle Ages Launched the Scientific Revolution. Without the medieval scholars, there would be no modern science. Discover the Dark Ages and their inventions, research methods, and what conclusions they actually made about the shape of the world.

Charlemagne

Charlemagne

  • Author: Matthias Becher
  • Publisher: Yale University Press
  • ISBN: 9780300107586
  • Category: Biography & Autobiography
  • Page: 170
  • View: 1901
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Charlemagne--ruler of the vast Frankish kingdom from 768 to his death in 814 and Holy Roman emperor from the year 800--is considered the father of Europe. He founded the first empire in western Europe after the fall of Rome, and his court at Aix-la-Chapelle was a center of classical learning and a focus of the Carolingian Renaissance. This book is a splendid introduction to Charlemagne’s life and legend. Matthias Becher describes Charlemagne’s rise to emperor and traces his political and military maneuvering against the Saxons, the Lombards, and others, as Charlemagne incorporated these lands into his own realm. Becher points out that under Charlemagne, jury courts were introduced, the laws of the Franks revised and written down, new coinage introduced, weights and measures reformed, and a Frankish grammar begun. Charlemagne tried to give his kingdom a spiritual basis by referring to antique traditions, says Becher, and he explores the tensions that existed in Charlemagne’s court between modern ideas and traditional thinking. He concludes by discussing Charlemagne’s kinship network, the evolving arrangements for his succession, the effects of his reign, and his posthumous fame. Concise, insightful, and eminently readable, this biography of Charlemagne provides a wealth of information about a remarkable man and his times.

Medieval Thought

Medieval Thought

The Western Intellectual Tradition from Antiquity to the Thirteenth Century

  • Author: Michael Haren
  • Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan
  • ISBN: 9780333573549
  • Category: History
  • Page: 328
  • View: 8596
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This classic text is known asan authoritative introduction to medieval thought for historians. Now, revised throughout,its second edition includesan extensive Supplementary Bibliography of recent primary and secondary scholarship and a new concluding chapter which critically surveys and sets in context the implications of the latest research. The text offers students a clear overview of thefield whose current vigor testifies to its contemporary importance in European intellectual culture.

The Beginnings of Western Science

The Beginnings of Western Science

The European Scientific Tradition in Philosophical, Religious, and Institutional Context, 600 B.C. to A.D. 1450

  • Author: David C. Lindberg
  • Publisher: University of Chicago Press
  • ISBN: 9780226482064
  • Category: Science
  • Page: 474
  • View: 2901
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This landmark book represents the first attempt in two decades to survey the science of the ancient world, the first attempt in four decades to write a comprehensive history of medieval science, and the first attempt ever to present a full, unified account of both ancient and medieval science in a single volume. In The Beginnings of Western Science, David C. Lindberg provides a rich chronicle of the development of scientific ideas, practices, and institutions from the pre-Socratic Greek philosophers to the late-medieval scholastics. Lindberg surveys all the most important themes in the history of ancient and medieval science, including developments in cosmology, astronomy, mechanics, optics, alchemy, natural history, and medicine. He synthesizes a wealth of information in superbly organized, clearly written chapters designed to serve students, scholars, and nonspecialists alike. In addition, Lindberg offers an illuminating account of the transmission of Greek science to medieval Islam and subsequently to medieval Europe. And throughout the book he pays close attention to the cultural and institutional contexts within which scientific knowledge was created and disseminated and to the ways in which the content and practice of science were influenced by interaction with philosophy and religion. Carefully selected maps, drawings, and photographs complement the text. Lindberg's story rests on a large body of important scholarship produced by historians of science, philosophy, and religion over the past few decades. However, Lindberg does not hesitate to offer new interpretations and to hazard fresh judgments aimed at resolving long-standing historical disputes. Addressed to the general educated reader as well as to students, his book will also appeal to any scholar whose interests touch on the history of the scientific enterprise.

On the Muslim Question

On the Muslim Question

  • Author: Anne Norton
  • Publisher: Princeton University Press
  • ISBN: 0691157049
  • Category: Political Science
  • Page: 265
  • View: 5596
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In the post-9/11 West, there is no shortage of strident voices telling us that Islam is a threat to the security, values, way of life, and even existence of the United States and Europe. For better or worse, "the Muslim question" has become the great question of our time. It is a question bound up with others--about freedom of speech, terror, violence, human rights, women's dress, and sexuality. Above all, it is tied to the possibility of democracy. In this fearless, original, and surprising book, Anne Norton demolishes the notion that there is a "clash of civilizations" between the West and Islam. What is really in question, she argues, is the West's commitment to its own ideals: to democracy and the Enlightenment trinity of liberty, equality, and fraternity. In the most fundamental sense, the Muslim question is about the values not of Islamic, but of Western, civilization. Moving between the United States and Europe, Norton provides a fresh perspective on iconic controversies, from the Danish cartoon of Muhammad to the murder of Theo van Gogh. She examines the arguments of a wide range of thinkers--from John Rawls to Slavoj Žižek. And she describes vivid everyday examples of ordinary Muslims and non-Muslims who have accepted each other and built a common life together. Ultimately, Norton provides a new vision of a richer and more diverse democratic life in the West, one that makes room for Muslims rather than scapegoating them for the West's own anxieties.

Nationalism

Nationalism

Five Roads to Modernity

  • Author: Liah Greenfeld
  • Publisher: Harvard University Press
  • ISBN: 9780674603196
  • Category: History
  • Page: 581
  • View: 1071
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Nationalism is a movement and a state of mind that brings together national identity, consciousness, and collectivities. A five-country study that spans five hundred years, this historically oriented work in sociology bids well to replace all previous works on the subject.

The Pagan Religions of the Ancient British Isles

The Pagan Religions of the Ancient British Isles

Their Nature and Legacy

  • Author: Ronald Hutton
  • Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell
  • ISBN: 9780631189466
  • Category: Religion
  • Page: 422
  • View: 6091
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This is the first survey of religious beliefs in the British Isles from the Old Stone Age to the coming of Christianity, one of the least familiar periods in Britain's history. Ronald Hutton draws upon a wealth of new data, much of it archaeological, that has transformed interpretation over the past decade. Giving more or less equal weight to all periods, from the Neolithic to the Middle Ages, he examines a fascinating range of evidence for Celtic and Romano-British paganism, from burial sites, cairns, megaliths and causeways, to carvings, figurines, jewellery, weapons, votive objects, literary texts and folklore.

The Mirror of Language (Revised Edition)

The Mirror of Language (Revised Edition)

A Study of the Medieval Theory of Knowledge

  • Author: Marcia L. Colish
  • Publisher: U of Nebraska Press
  • ISBN: 9780803264472
  • Category: Philosophy
  • Page: 339
  • View: 3114
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Early Christianity faced the problem of the human word versus Christ the Word. Could language accurately describe spiritual reality? The Mirror of Language brilliantly traces the development of one prominent theory of signs from Augustine through Anselm of Canterbury, Thomas Aquinas, and Dante. Their shared epistemology validated human language as an authentic but limited index of preexistent reality, both material and spiritual. This sign theory could thereby account for the ways men receive, know, and transmit religious knowledge, always mediated through faith. Marcia L. Colish demonstrates how the three theologians used different branches of the medieval trivium to express a common sign theory: Augustine stressed rhetoric, Anselm shifted to grammar (including grammatical proofs of God's existence), and Thomas Aquinas stressed dialectic. Dante, the one poet included in this study, used the Augustinian sign theory to develop a Christian poetics that culminates in the Divine Comedy. The author points out not only the commonality but also the sharp contrasts between these writers and shows the relation between their sign theories and the intellectual ferment of the times. When first published in 1968, The Mirror of Language was recognized as a pathfinding study. This completely revised edition incorporates the scholarship of the intervening years and reflects the refinements of the author's thought. Greater prominence is given to the role of Stoicism, and sharper attention is paid to some of the thinkers and movements surrounding the major thinkers treated. Concerns of semiotics, philosophy, and literary criticism are elucidated further. The original thesis, still controversial, is now even wider ranging and more salient to current intellectual debate.

Aristotle's Children

Aristotle's Children

How Christians, Muslims, and Jews Rediscovered Ancient Wisdom and Illuminated the Middle Ages

  • Author: Richard E. Rubenstein
  • Publisher: HMH
  • ISBN: 9780547350974
  • Category: History
  • Page: 384
  • View: 6837
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A true account of a turning point in medieval history that shaped the modern world, from “a superb storyteller” and the author of When Jesus Became God (Los Angeles Times). Europe was in the long slumber of the Middle Ages, the Roman Empire was in tatters, and the Greek language was all but forgotten—until a group of twelfth-century scholars rediscovered and translated the works of Aristotle. The philosopher’s ideas spread like wildfire across Europe, offering the scientific view that the natural world, including the soul of man, was a proper subject of study. The rediscovery of these ancient ideas would spark riots and heresy trials, cause major upheavals in the Catholic Church—and also set the stage for today’s rift between reason and religion. Aristotle’s Children transports us back to this pivotal moment in world history, rendering the controversies of the Middle Ages lively and accessible, and allowing us to understand the philosophical ideas that are fundamental to modern thought. “A superb storyteller who breathes new life into such fascinating figures as Peter Abelard, Albertus Magnus, St. Thomas Aquinas, Roger Bacon, William of Ockham and Aristotle himself.” —Los Angeles Times “Rubenstein’s lively prose, his lucid insights and his crystal-clear historical analyses make this a first-rate study in the history of ideas.” —Publishers Weekly