Search Results for "missions-nationalism-and-the-end-of-empire"

Missions, Nationalism and the End of Empire

Missions, Nationalism and the End of Empire

  • Author: Stanley
  • Publisher: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing
  • ISBN: 9780802821164
  • Category: Religion
  • Page: 313
  • View: 5903
DOWNLOAD NOW »
British and US historians explore linkages between Christian churches, and in particular their missionary bodies, and the dynamics of anti- colonial nationalism and decolonization in the non-Western world during the 20th century. The 13 papers were originally presented at a September 2000 conference

Capitalism and Nationalism at the End of Empire

Capitalism and Nationalism at the End of Empire

State and Business in Decolonizing Egypt, Nigeria, and Kenya, 1945-1963

  • Author: Robert L. Tignor
  • Publisher: Princeton Legacy Library
  • ISBN: 9780691606101
  • Category: Business & Economics
  • Page: 434
  • View: 9515
DOWNLOAD NOW »
The two decades that followed World War II witnessed the end of the great European empires in Asia and Africa. Robert Tignor's new study of the decolonization experiences of Egypt, Nigeria, and Kenya elucidates the major factors that led to the transfer of power from British to African hands in these three territories. Employing a comparative method in order to explain the different decolonizing narratives in each territory, he argues that the different state policies toward the private business sector and foreign capital were the result of nationalist policies and attitudes and the influence of Cold War pressures on local events. Using business records as well as official government sources, the work highlights the economic aspects of decolonization and weighs the influence of nationalist movements, changes in metropolitan attitudes toward the empire, and shifts in the international balance of power in bringing about the transfer of authority. The author concludes that the business communities did not play decisive roles, adhering instead to their time-honored role of leaving political issues to colonial officials and their nationalist critics. Tignor also finds that the nationalist movements, far from being ineffective, largely realized the primary goals of nationalist leaders that had been articulated for many decades. Originally published in 1997. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback and hardcover editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.

No Enchanted Palace

No Enchanted Palace

The End of Empire and the Ideological Origins of the United Nations

  • Author: Mark Mazower
  • Publisher: Princeton University Press
  • ISBN: 9781400831661
  • Category: History
  • Page: 248
  • View: 5502
DOWNLOAD NOW »
No Enchanted Palace traces the origins and early development of the United Nations, one of the most influential yet perhaps least understood organizations active in the world today. Acclaimed historian Mark Mazower forces us to set aside the popular myth that the UN miraculously rose from the ashes of World War II as the guardian of a new and peaceful global order, offering instead a strikingly original interpretation of the UN's ideological roots, early history, and changing role in world affairs. Mazower brings the founding of the UN brilliantly to life. He shows how the UN's creators envisioned a world organization that would protect the interests of empire, yet how this imperial vision was decisively reshaped by the postwar reaffirmation of national sovereignty and the unanticipated rise of India and other former colonial powers. This is a story told through the clash of personalities, such as South African statesman Jan Smuts, who saw in the UN a means to protect the old imperial and racial order; Raphael Lemkin and Joseph Schechtman, Jewish intellectuals at odds over how the UN should combat genocide and other atrocities; and Jawaharlal Nehru, India's first prime minister, who helped transform the UN from an instrument of empire into a forum for ending it. A much-needed historical reappraisal of the early development of this vital world institution, No Enchanted Palace reveals how the UN outgrew its origins and has exhibited an extraordinary flexibility that has enabled it to endure to the present day.

Cinema at the End of Empire

Cinema at the End of Empire

A Politics of Transition in Britain and India

  • Author: Priya Jaikumar
  • Publisher: Duke University Press
  • ISBN: 9780822337935
  • Category: History
  • Page: 318
  • View: 4111
DOWNLOAD NOW »
DIVHistory of the relationship between government regulation of the film industry in the UK and the the developing film industry in India between the 1920s and 1940s./div

The Virtue of Nationalism

The Virtue of Nationalism

  • Author: Yoram Hazony
  • Publisher: Basic Books
  • ISBN: 1541645383
  • Category: Political Science
  • Page: 304
  • View: 1945
DOWNLOAD NOW »
A leading conservative thinker argues that a nationalist order is the only realistic safeguard of liberty in the world today Nationalism is the issue of our age. From Donald Trump's "America First" politics to Brexit to the rise of the right in Europe, events have forced a crucial debate: Should we fight for international government? Or should the world's nations keep their independence and self-determination? In The Virtue of Nationalism, Yoram Hazony contends that a world of sovereign nations is the only option for those who care about personal and collective freedom. He recounts how, beginning in the sixteenth century, English, Dutch, and American Protestants revived the Old Testament's love of national independence, and shows how their vision eventually brought freedom to peoples from Poland to India, Israel to Ethiopia. It is this tradition we must restore, he argues, if we want to limit conflict and hate--and allow human difference and innovation to flourish.

Anti-Imperial Metropolis

Anti-Imperial Metropolis

Interwar Paris and the Seeds of Third World Nationalism

  • Author: Michael Goebel
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press
  • ISBN: 1316352188
  • Category: History
  • Page: N.A
  • View: 9767
DOWNLOAD NOW »
This book traces the spread of a global anti-imperialism from the vantage point of Paris between the two World Wars, where countless future leaders of Third World countries spent formative stints. Exploring the local social context in which these emergent activists moved, the study delves into assassination plots allegedly hatched by Chinese students, demonstrations by Latin American nationalists, and the everyday lives of Algerian, Senegalese and Vietnamese workers. On the basis of police reports and other primary sources, the book foregrounds the role of migration and interaction as driving forces enabling challenges to the imperial world order, weaving together the stories of peoples of three continents. Drawing on the scholarship of twentieth-century imperial, international and global history as well as migration, race and ethnicity in France, it ultimately proposes a new understanding of the roots of the Third World idea.

The End of Tsarist Russia

The End of Tsarist Russia

The March to World War I and Revolution

  • Author: Dominic Lieven
  • Publisher: Penguin
  • ISBN: 0698195566
  • Category: History
  • Page: 448
  • View: 5652
DOWNLOAD NOW »
An Economist Best Book of the Year A Financial Times Best Book of the Year Winner of the the Pushkin House Russian Book Prize Finalist for the Lionel Gelber Prize An Amazon Best Book of the Month (History) One of the world’s leading scholars offers a fresh interpretation of the linked origins of World War I and the Russian Revolution "Lieven has a double gift: first, for harvesting details to convey the essence of an era and, second, for finding new, startling, and clarifying elements in familiar stories. This is history with a heartbeat, and it could not be more engrossing."—Foreign Affairs World War I and the Russian Revolution together shaped the twentieth century in profound ways. In The End of Tsarist Russia, acclaimed scholar Dominic Lieven connects for the first time the two events, providing both a history of the First World War’s origins from a Russian perspective and an international history of why the revolution happened. Based on exhaustive work in seven Russian archives as well as many non-Russian sources, Dominic Lieven’s work is about far more than just Russia. By placing the crisis of empire at its core, Lieven links World War I to the sweep of twentieth-century global history. He shows how contemporary hot issues such as the struggle for Ukraine were already crucial elements in the run-up to 1914. By incorporating into his book new approaches and comparisons, Lieven tells the story of war and revolution in a way that is truly original and thought-provoking. From the Hardcover edition.

Tensions of Empire

Tensions of Empire

Colonial Cultures in a Bourgeois World

  • Author: Frederick Cooper,Ann Laura Stoler
  • Publisher: Univ of California Press
  • ISBN: 9780520206052
  • Category: History
  • Page: 470
  • View: 8121
DOWNLOAD NOW »
Starting with the premise that Europe was made by its imperial projects as much as colonial encounters were shaped by events and conflicts in Europe, this volume investigates metropolitan-colonial relationships. It shows how "civilizing missions" often provided new sites for a bourgeois order.

The Crime of Nationalism

The Crime of Nationalism

Britain, Palestine, and Nation-Building on the Fringe of Empire

  • Author: Matthew Kelly
  • Publisher: Univ of California Press
  • ISBN: 0520965256
  • Category: History
  • Page: 264
  • View: 7784
DOWNLOAD NOW »
The Palestinian national movement gestated in the early decades of the twentieth century, but it was born during the Great Revolt of 1936–39, a period of Arab rebellion against British policy in the Palestine mandate. In The Crime of Nationalism, Matthew Kraig Kelly makes the unique case that the key to understanding the Great Revolt lies in what he calls the “crimino-national” domain—the overlap between the criminological and the nationalist dimensions of British imperial discourse, and the primary terrain upon which the war of 1936–39 was fought. Kelly’s analysis amounts to a new history of one of the major anticolonial insurgencies of the interwar period and a critical moment in the lead-up to Israel’s founding. The Crime of Nationalism offers crucial lessons for the scholarly understanding of nationalism and insurgency more broadly.

Missions and Empire

Missions and Empire

  • Author: Norman Etherington
  • Publisher: OUP Oxford
  • ISBN: 9780191531064
  • Category: History
  • Page: 352
  • View: 5338
DOWNLOAD NOW »
The explosive expansion of Christianity in Africa and Asia during the last two centuries constitutes one of the most remarkable cultural transformations in the history of mankind. Because it coincided with the spread of European economic and political hegemony, it tends to be taken for granted that Christian missions went hand in hand with imperialism and colonial conquest. In this book historians survey the relationship between Christian missions and the British Empire from the seventeenth century to the 1960s and treat the subject thematically, rather than regionally or chronologically. Many of these themes are treated at length for the first time, relating the work of missions to language, medicine, anthropology, and decolonization. Other important chapters focus on the difficult relationship between missionaries and white settlers, women and mission, and the neglected role of the indigenous evangelists who did far more than European or North American missionaries to spread the Christian religion - belying the image of Christianity as the 'white man's religion'.

Incoherent Empire

Incoherent Empire

  • Author: Michael Mann
  • Publisher: Verso
  • ISBN: 9781844675289
  • Category: Political Science
  • Page: 278
  • View: 6884
DOWNLOAD NOW »
A provocative critique of George W. Bush and his administration analyzes the dangerous, self-interested, anti-democratic, and imperialistic policies of the Bush administration, arguing that they have resulted in increasing stagnation, militarism, and new threats of terrorism. Reprint.

Visions of Empire

Visions of Empire

How Five Imperial Regimes Shaped the World

  • Author: Krishan Kumar
  • Publisher: Princeton University Press
  • ISBN: 1400884918
  • Category: History
  • Page: 600
  • View: 933
DOWNLOAD NOW »
What the rulers of empire can teach us about navigating today's increasingly interconnected world The empires of the past were far-flung experiments in multinationalism and multiculturalism, and have much to teach us about navigating our own increasingly globalized and interconnected world. Until now, most recent scholarship on empires has focused on their subject peoples. Visions of Empire looks at their rulers, shedding critical new light on who they were, how they justified their empires, how they viewed themselves, and the styles of rule they adopted toward their subjects. Krishan Kumar provides panoramic and multifaceted portraits of five major European empires—Ottoman, Habsburg, Russian/Soviet, British, and French—showing how each, like ancient Rome, saw itself as the carrier of universal civilization to the rest of the world. Sometimes these aims were couched in religious terms, as with Islam for the Ottomans or Catholicism for the Habsburgs. Later, the imperial missions took more secular forms, as with British political traditions or the world communism of the Soviets. Visions of Empire offers new insights into the interactions between rulers and ruled, revealing how empire was as much a shared enterprise as a clash of oppositional interests. It explores how these empires differed from nation-states, particularly in how the ruling peoples of empires were forced to downplay or suppress their own national or ethnic identities in the interests of the long-term preservation of their rule. This compelling and in-depth book demonstrates how the rulers of empire, in their quest for a universal world order, left behind a legacy of multiculturalism and diversity that is uniquely relevant for us today.

The Oxford History of the British Empire: The eighteenth century

The Oxford History of the British Empire: The eighteenth century

  • Author: Alaine M. Low,P. J. Marshall
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand
  • ISBN: 9780199246779
  • Category: History
  • Page: 639
  • View: 3473
DOWNLOAD NOW »
The Oxford History of the British Empire is a major new assessment by leading scholars. Volume II examines the history of British worldwide expansion from the Glorious Revolution of 1689 to the end of the Napoleonic Wars, a crucial phase in the creation of the modern British Empire. This is the age of General Wolfe, Clive of India, and Captain Cook. Although the Empire was ruptured by the American Revolution, it survived and grew into the British Empire that was to dominate the world during the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

Tournament of Shadows

Tournament of Shadows

The Great Game and the Race for Empire in Central Asia

  • Author: Karl E. Meyer,Shareen Blair Brysac
  • Publisher: Basic Books
  • ISBN: 078673678X
  • Category: History
  • Page: 704
  • View: 2715
DOWNLOAD NOW »
From the romantic conflicts of the Victorian Great Game to the war-torn history of the region in recent decades, Tournament of Shadows traces the struggle for control of Central Asia and Tibet from the 1830s to the present. The original Great Game, the clandestine struggle between Russia and Britain for mastery of Central Asia, has long been regarded as one of the greatest geopolitical conflicts in history. Many believed that control of the vast Eurasian heartland was the key to world dominion. The original Great Game ended with the Russian Revolution, but the geopolitical struggles in Central Asia continue to the present day. In this updated edition, the authors reflect on Central Asia's history since the end of the Russo-Afghan war, and particularly in the wake of 9/11.

Ambiguities of Empire

Ambiguities of Empire

Essays in Honour of Andrew Porter

  • Author: Robert Holland,Sarah Stockwell
  • Publisher: Routledge
  • ISBN: 1317990749
  • Category: History
  • Page: 240
  • View: 6634
DOWNLOAD NOW »
This book comprises essays offered by friends, colleagues, and former students in tribute to Andrew Porter, on the occasion of his retirement from the Rhodes Chair in Imperial History at the University of London. The contributors, including many distinguished historians, explore through a variety of case studies ‘ambiguities of empire’ and of imperial and quasi-imperial relationships, reflecting important themes in Professor Porter’s own writing. Whilst the range of articles reflects the breadth of Andrew Porter’s scholarly collaborations and interests, the chapters focus in particular on two aspects of imperial history which have been the subject of his particular attention: religion and empire and the end of empire. The book contains original pieces on the history of British imperialism currently the subject of considerable scholarly attention. The book will be invaluable to students and scholars of empire, religion and colonialism. This book was published as a special issue of the Journal of Imperial and Commonwealth History.

The Decolonization Of Africa

The Decolonization Of Africa

  • Author: Professor David Birmingham,David Birmingham
  • Publisher: Routledge
  • ISBN: 1135363676
  • Category: History
  • Page: 117
  • View: 8006
DOWNLOAD NOW »
This bold, popularizing synthesis presents a readily accessible introduction to one of the major themes of the twentieth-century world history. Between 1922, when self-government was restored to Egypt, and 1994, when non-racial democracy was achieved in South Africa, no less than 54 new nations were established in Africa. Written within the parameters of African history, as opposed to imperial history, this study charts the process of nationalism, liberation and independence that recast the political map of Africa in these years. Ranging from Algeria in the North, where a French colonial government used armed force to combat the Algerian aspirations of home rule, to the final overthrow of aparthied in the South, this is an authoritative survey that will be welcomed by all students tackling this complex and challenging topic.

In the Ruins of Empire

In the Ruins of Empire

The Japanese Surrender and the Battle for Postwar Asia

  • Author: Ronald Spector
  • Publisher: Random House
  • ISBN: 1588367215
  • Category: History
  • Page: 400
  • View: 1361
DOWNLOAD NOW »
The New York Times said of Ronald H. Spector’s classic account of the American struggle against the Japanese in World War II, “No future book on the Pacific War will be written without paying due tribute to Eagle Against the Sun.” Now Spector has returned with a book that is even more revealing. In the Ruins of Empire chronicles the startling aftermath of this crucial twentieth-century conflict. With access to recently available firsthand accounts by Chinese, Japanese, British, and American witnesses and previously top secret U.S. intelligence records, Spector tells for the first time the fascinating story of the deadly confrontations that broke out–or merely continued–in Asia after peace was proclaimed at the end of World War II. Under occupation by the victorious Allies, this part of the world was plunged into new power struggles or back into old feuds that in some ways were worse than the war itself. In the Ruins of Empire also shows how the U.S. and Soviet governments, as they secretly vied for influence in liberated lands, were soon at odds. At the time of the peace declaration, international suspicions were still strong. Joseph Stalin warned that “crazy cutthroats” might disrupt the surrender ceremony in Tokyo Bay. Die-hard Japanese officers plotted to seize the emperor’s palace to prevent an announcement of surrender, and clandestine relief forces were sent to rescue thousands of Allied POWs to prevent their being massacred. In the Ruins of Empire paints a vivid picture of the postwar intrigues and violence. In Manchuria, Russian “liberators” looted, raped, and killed innocent civilians, and a fratricidal rivalry continued between Chiang Kai-shek’s regime and Mao’s revolutionaries. Communist resistance forces in Malaya settled old scores and terrorized the indigenous population, while mujahideen holy warriors staged reprisals and terror killings against the Chinese–hundreds of innocent civilians were killed on both sides. In Indochina, a nativist political movement rose up to oppose the resumption of French colonial rule; one of the factions that struggled for supremacy was the Communist Viet Minh led by Ho Chi Minh. Korea became a powder keg with the Russians and Americans entangled in its north and south. And in Java, as the Indonesian novelist Idrus wrote, people brutalized by years of Japanese occupation “worshipped a new God in the form of bombs, submachine guns, and mortars.” Through impeccable research and provocative analysis, as well as compelling accounts of American, British, Indian, and Australian soldiers charged with overseeing the surrender and repatriation of millions of Japanese in the heart of dangerous territory, Spector casts new and startling light on this pivotal time–and sets the record straight about this contested and important period in history. From the Hardcover edition.

The Guardians

The Guardians

The League of Nations and the Crisis of Empire

  • Author: Susan Pedersen
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press
  • ISBN: 0190226390
  • Category: History
  • Page: 416
  • View: 9050
DOWNLOAD NOW »
Winner of the Cundill Prize in Historical Literature Shortlisted for the Lionel Gelber Prize At the end of the First World War, the Paris Peace Conference saw a battle over the future of empire. The victorious allied powers wanted to annex the Ottoman territories and German colonies they had occupied; Woodrow Wilson and a groundswell of anti-imperialist activism stood in their way. France, Belgium, Japan and the British dominions reluctantly agreed to an Anglo-American proposal to hold and administer those allied conquests under "mandate" from the new League of Nations. In the end, fourteen mandated territories were set up across the Middle East, Africa and the Pacific. Against all odds, these disparate and far-flung territories became the site and the vehicle of global transformation. In this masterful history of the mandates system, Susan Pedersen illuminates the role the League of Nations played in creating the modern world. Tracing the system from its creation in 1920 until its demise in 1939, Pedersen examines its workings from the realm of international diplomacy; the viewpoints of the League's experts and officials; and the arena of local struggles within the territories themselves. Featuring a cast of larger-than-life figures, including Lord Lugard, King Faisal, Chaim Weizmann and Ralph Bunche, the narrative sweeps across the globe-from windswept scrublands along the Orange River to famine-blighted hilltops in Rwanda to Damascus under French bombardment-but always returns to Switzerland and the sometimes vicious battles over ideas of civilization, independence, economic relations, and sovereignty in the Geneva headquarters. As Pedersen shows, although the architects and officials of the mandates system always sought to uphold imperial authority, colonial nationalists, German revisionists, African-American intellectuals and others were able to use the platform Geneva offered to challenge their claims. Amid this cacophony, imperial statesmen began exploring new means - client states, economic concessions - of securing Western hegemony. In the end, the mandate system helped to create the world in which we now live. A riveting work of global history, The Guardians enables us to look back at the League with new eyes, and in doing so, appreciate how complex, multivalent, and consequential this first great experiment in internationalism really was.

Edge of Empires

Edge of Empires

Chinese Elites and British Colonials in Hong Kong

  • Author: John M. CARROLL,John M Carroll
  • Publisher: Harvard University Press
  • ISBN: 0674029232
  • Category: History
  • Page: 274
  • View: 2404
DOWNLOAD NOW »

Beyond Christendom

Beyond Christendom

Globalization, African Migration, and the Transformation of the West

  • Author: Jehu Hanciles
  • Publisher: Orbis Books
  • ISBN: 1608331032
  • Category: Religion
  • Page: 430
  • View: 7444
DOWNLOAD NOW »
Hanciles does yeoman work in part one synthesizing studies on the impact of globalization, revealing that its outcomes will likely not be determined by the Euro-American heartlands that sparked this movement. Instead, in parts two he shows that migration in general is having an enormous effect on shaping a new world order, and in part three, "Mobile Faith," he advances the case for the migration of Christians as carrying within it the seeds of renewal for the whole church and also the potential to reshape church-state and religion and culture relations globally.