Search Results for "national-rhythms-african-roots"

National Rhythms, African Roots

National Rhythms, African Roots

The Deep History of Latin American Popular Dance

  • Author: John Charles Chasteen
  • Publisher: UNM Press
  • ISBN: 9780826329417
  • Category: History
  • Page: 257
  • View: 7888
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When John Charles Chasteen learned that Sim?n Bolívar, the Liberator, danced on a banquet table to celebrate Latin American independence in 1824, he tried to visualize the scene. How, he wondered, did the Liberator dance? Did he bounce stiffly in his dress uniform? Or did he move his hips? In other words, how high had African dance influences reached in Latin American societies? A vast social gap separated Bolívar from people of African descent; however, Chasteen's research shows that popular culture could bridge the gap. Fast-paced and often funny, this book explores the history of Latin American popular dance before the twentieth century. Chasteen first focuses on Havana, Buenos Aires, and Rio de Janeiro, where dances featuring a "transgressive close embrace" (forerunners of today's salsa, tango, and samba) emerged by 1900. Then, digging deeper in time, Chasteen uncovers the historical experiences that molded Latin American popular dance, including carnival celebrations, the social lives of slaves, European fashions, and, oddly enough, religious processions. The relationship between Latin American dance and nationalism, it turns out, is very deep, indeed.

National Rhythms, African Roots

National Rhythms, African Roots

The Deep History of Latin American Popular Dance

  • Author: John Charles Chasteen
  • Publisher: N.A
  • ISBN: N.A
  • Category: History
  • Page: 257
  • View: 9679
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When John Charles Chasteen learned that Sim?n Bolívar, the Liberator, danced on a banquet table to celebrate Latin American independence in 1824, he tried to visualize the scene. How, he wondered, did the Liberator dance? Did he bounce stiffly in his dress uniform? Or did he move his hips? In other words, how high had African dance influences reached in Latin American societies? A vast social gap separated Bolívar from people of African descent; however, Chasteen's research shows that popular culture could bridge the gap. Fast-paced and often funny, this book explores the history of Latin American popular dance before the twentieth century. Chasteen first focuses on Havana, Buenos Aires, and Rio de Janeiro, where dances featuring a "transgressive close embrace" (forerunners of today's salsa, tango, and samba) emerged by 1900. Then, digging deeper in time, Chasteen uncovers the historical experiences that molded Latin American popular dance, including carnival celebrations, the social lives of slaves, European fashions, and, oddly enough, religious processions. The relationship between Latin American dance and nationalism, it turns out, is very deep, indeed.

Born in Blood and Fire

Born in Blood and Fire

A Concise History of Latin America, Fourth Edition

  • Author: John Charles Chasteen
  • Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
  • ISBN: 0393283054
  • Category: History
  • Page: 356
  • View: 5397
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Born in Blood and Fire, Fourth Edition has been extensively revised to heighten emphasis on current cultural analyses of Latin American society and facilitate meaningful connections between the Encounter and the present. Throughout the Fourth Edition, a new full-color design highlights an enriched and expanded map and illustration program. This, along with new quizzing and assessment options and a new edition of the companion reader, offers students and instructors more support than ever before.

Heroes on Horseback

Heroes on Horseback

A Life and Times of the Last Gaucho Caudillos

  • Author: John Charles Chasteen
  • Publisher: UNM Press
  • ISBN: 9780826315984
  • Category: History
  • Page: 241
  • View: 8892
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"Well-written study of 19th-century caudillismo and border politics looks at both leaders and followers during the 1893-94 Federalist War and subsequent uprisings in Uruguay. The caudillos were charismatic leaders who embodied the values and aspirations of the rural masses on both sides of the border, values represented by the 'myth of the patriada.'"--Handbook of Latin American Studies, v. 58.

Atlantic Creoles in the Age of Revolutions

Atlantic Creoles in the Age of Revolutions

  • Author: Jane Landers
  • Publisher: Harvard University Press
  • ISBN: 0674035917
  • Category: History
  • Page: 340
  • View: 2206
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Sailing the tide of a tumultuous era of Atlantic revolutions, a remarkable group of African-born and African-descended individuals transformed themselves from slaves into active agents of their lives and times. Through prodigious archival research, Jane Landers radically alters our vision of the breadth and extent of the Age of Revolution, and our understanding of its actors.

Recreating Africa

Recreating Africa

Culture, Kinship, and Religion in the African-Portuguese World, 1441-1770

  • Author: James H. Sweet
  • Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press
  • ISBN: 9780807862346
  • Category: History
  • Page: 320
  • View: 8520
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Exploring the cultural lives of African slaves in the early colonial Portuguese world, with an emphasis on the more than one million Central Africans who survived the journey to Brazil, James Sweet lifts a curtain on their lives as Africans rather than as incipient Brazilians. Focusing first on the cultures of Central Africa from which the slaves came--Ndembu, Imbangala, Kongo, and others--Sweet identifies specific cultural rites and beliefs that survived their transplantation to the African-Portuguese diaspora, arguing that they did not give way to immediate creolization in the New World but remained distinctly African for some time. Slaves transferred many cultural practices from their homelands to Brazil, including kinship structures, divination rituals, judicial ordeals, ritual burials, dietary restrictions, and secret societies. Sweet demonstrates that the structures of many of these practices remained constant during this early period, although the meanings of the rituals were often transformed as slaves coped with their new environment and status. Religious rituals in particular became potent forms of protest against the institution of slavery and its hardships. In addition, Sweet examines how certain African beliefs and customs challenged and ultimately influenced Brazilian Catholicism. Sweet's analysis sheds new light on African culture in Brazil's slave society while also enriching our understanding of the complex process of creolization and cultural survival.

African Rhythms

African Rhythms

The Autobiography of Randy Weston

  • Author: Randy Weston,Willard Jenkins
  • Publisher: Duke University Press
  • ISBN: 0822393107
  • Category: Music
  • Page: 352
  • View: 7385
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The pianist, composer, and bandleader Randy Weston is one of the world’s most influential jazz musicians and a remarkable storyteller whose career has spanned five continents and more than six decades. Packed with fascinating anecdotes, African Rhythms is Weston’s life story, as told by him to the music journalist Willard Jenkins. It encompasses Weston’s childhood in Brooklyn’s Bedford-Stuyvesant neighborhood—where his parents and other members of their generation imbued him with pride in his African heritage—and his introduction to jazz and early years as a musician in the artistic ferment of mid-twentieth-century New York. His music has taken him around the world: he has performed in eighteen African countries, in Buddhist temples and Shinto shrines, in the Canterbury Cathedral, and at the grand opening of the Bibliotheca Alexandrina: The New Library of Alexandria. Africa is at the core of Weston’s music and spirituality. He has traversed the continent on a continuous quest to learn about its musical traditions, produced its first major jazz festival, and lived for years in Morocco, where he opened a popular jazz club, the African Rhythms Club, in Tangier. Weston’s narrative is replete with tales of the people he has met and befriended, and with whom he has worked. He describes his unique partnerships with Langston Hughes, the musician and arranger Melba Liston, and the jazz scholar Marshall Stearns, as well as his friendships and collaborations with Duke Ellington, Dizzy Gillespie, Coleman Hawkins, Thelonious Monk, Billy Strayhorn, Max Roach, Charlie Parker, Miles Davis, the novelist Paul Bowles, the Cuban percussionist Candido Camero, the Ghanaian jazz artist Kofi Ghanaba, the Gnawa musicians of Morocco, and many others. With African Rhythms, an international jazz virtuoso continues to create cultural history.

Sports Culture in Latin American History

Sports Culture in Latin American History

  • Author: David M. K. Sheinin
  • Publisher: University of Pittsburgh Press
  • ISBN: 0822980452
  • Category: History
  • Page: 232
  • View: 1448
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Perhaps no other activity is more synonymous with passion, identity, bodily ideals, and the power of place than sport. As the essays in this volume show, the function of sport as a historical and cultural marker is particularly relevant in Latin America. From the late nineteenth century to the present, the contributors reveal how sport opens a wide window into local, regional, and national histories. The essays examine the role of sport as a political vehicle, in claims to citizenship, as a source of community and ethnic pride, as a symbol of masculinity or feminism, as allegorical performance, and in many other purposes. Sports Culture in Latin American History juxtaposes analyses of better-known activities such as boxing and soccer with first peoples’ athletics in Argentina, Cholita wrestling in Bolivia, the African-influenced martial art of capoeira, Japanese Brazilian gateball, the “Art Deco” body ideal for postrevolutionary Mexican women, Jewish soccer fans in Argentina and transgressive behavior at matches, and other topics. The contributors view the local origins and adaptations of these athletic activities and their significance as insightful narrators of history and culture.

Oye Como Va!

Oye Como Va!

Hybridity and Identity in Latino Popular Music

  • Author: Deborah Pacini Hernandez
  • Publisher: Temple University Press
  • ISBN: 1439900914
  • Category: Music
  • Page: 238
  • View: 1581
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Latino music as an amalgam of American cultures.

A Place in Politics

A Place in Politics

São Paulo, Brazil, from Seigneurial Republicanism to Regionalist Revolt

  • Author: James Woodard
  • Publisher: Duke University Press
  • ISBN: 0822389452
  • Category: History
  • Page: 422
  • View: 4885
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A Place in Politics is a thorough reinterpretation of the politics and political culture of the Brazilian state of São Paulo between the 1890s and the 1930s. The world’s foremost coffee-producing region from the outset of this period and home to more than six million people by 1930, São Paulo was an economic and demographic giant. In an era marked by political conflict and dramatic social and cultural change in Brazil, nowhere were the conflicts as intense or changes more dramatic than in São Paulo. The southeastern state was the site of the country’s most important political developments, from the contested presidential campaign of 1909–10 to the massive military revolt of 1924. Drawing on a wide array of source materials, James P. Woodard analyzes these events and the republican political culture that informed them. Woodard’s fine-grained political history proceeds chronologically from the final years of the nineteenth century, when São Paulo’s leaders enjoyed political preeminence within the federal system codified by the Constitution of 1891, through the mass mobilization of 1931–32, in which São Paulo’s people marched, rioted, and eventually took up arms against the national government in what was to be Brazil’s last great regionalist revolt. In taking to the streets in the name of their state, constitutionalism, and the “civilization” that they identified with both, the people of São Paulo were at once expressing their allegiance to elements of a regionally distinct political culture and converging on a broader, more participatory public sphere that had arisen amid the political conflicts of the preceding decades.

Getting High

Getting High

Marijuana through the Ages

  • Author: John Charles Chasteen
  • Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
  • ISBN: 144225470X
  • Category: History
  • Page: 168
  • View: 5506
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This fascinating book traces the global history of marijuana, reaching back thousands of years. Noted historian John Charles Chasteen follows the use of the drug since Neolithic times, which makes marijuana among the first domesticated plants. Surprisingly, though, only infrequently has it been used as a recreational drug. Instead, there is a vibrant spiritual dimension to its long history that has been continually ignored. Beginning with the familiar “outbreak” of the 1960s, Chasteen unearths successive layers of marijuana’s history. Written with insight, clarity, sophistication, and good humor, this deeply informed work discusses the cultivation of cannabis and its many forms, including hemp, one of the world’s principal fiber crops. After a tour of Latin America, Africa, India, and the Muslim world, Chasteen concludes that unlike alcohol marijuana has always flourished outside the mainstream. Its principal users have been creative outsiders of many kinds—mystics, artists, musicians, free thinkers, and spiritual seekers—as well as poor laborers attracted by its low cost. Marijuana, it seems, is a mind-expanding drug after all, and Chasteen explores its rich heritage with captivating insight.

Soulstepping

Soulstepping

African American Step Shows

  • Author: Elizabeth Calvert Fine
  • Publisher: University of Illinois Press
  • ISBN: 9780252024757
  • Category: Performing Arts
  • Page: 193
  • View: 7187
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Stepping is a complex performance that melds folk traditions with popular culture and involves synchronized percussive movement, singing, speaking, chanting, and drama. Developed by African American fraternities and sororities, it is now practiced worldwide. Soulstepping is the first book to document the history of stepping, its roots in African and African American culture, and its transformation by churches, schools, and social groups into a powerful tool for instilling group identity and community involvement. Elizabeth C. Fine's vibrant portrayal of the cultural politics of stepping covers the spread to new venues and participants, including Latino and Asian American Greek-letter organizations. She draws on interviews with individuals on college campuses and steppers and stepping coaches from high schools, community groups, churches, and dance organizations as she traces the widespread growth of stepping and uncovers the controversies surrounding it.

Problems in Modern Latin American History

Problems in Modern Latin American History

A Reader

  • Author: John Charles Chasteen,Joseph S. Tulchin
  • Publisher: Scholarly Resources Incorporated
  • ISBN: N.A
  • Category: History
  • Page: 339
  • View: 3059
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Problems in Modern Latin American History: A Reader is the long-awaited successor to Joseph S. Tulchin's Problems in Latin American History, which was published more than twenty years ago and has been out of print for ten. Realizing how the field has changed in the past two decades, Professors Chasteen and Tulchin have compiled a work that addresses new topics and issues to serve both faculty and students alike.p The authors examine nine problems in modern Latin America-issues that complement most survey texts and create geographical and chronological spans maximizing the book's applicability to various classroom needs. Each of the book's nine chapters, compiled by an expert in the field, begins with an introduction that provides an overview of the problem to be examined.p

Learning Capoeira

Learning Capoeira

lessons in cunning from an Afro-Brazilian art

  • Author: Greg Downey
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
  • ISBN: N.A
  • Category: Performing Arts
  • Page: 272
  • View: 7605
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Learning Capoeira: Lessons in Cunning from an Afro-Brazilian Art is a provocative look at capoeira, a demanding acrobatic art that combines dance, ritual, music, and fighting style. First created by slaves, freedmen, and gang members, capoeira is a study in contrasts that integrates African-descended rhythms and flowing dance steps with hard lessons from the street. According to veteran teachers, capoeira will transform novices, instilling in them a sense of malicia, or "cunning," and changing how they walk, hear, and interact. Learning Capoeira is an ethnographic study based on author Greg Downey's extensive research about capoeira and more than ten years of apprenticeship. It looks at lessons from traditional capoeira teachers in Salvador, Brazil, capturing the spoken and unspoken ways in which they pass on the art to future generations. Downey explores how bodily training can affect players' perceptions and social interactions, both within the circular roda, the "ring" where the game takes place, as well as outside it, in their daily lives. He brings together an experience-centered, phenomenological analysis of the art with recent discoveries in psychology and the neurosciences about the effects of physical education on perception. The text is enhanced by more than twenty photos of capoeira sessions, many taken by veteran teacher, Mestre Cobra Mansa. Learning Capoeira breaks from many contemporary trends in cultural studies of all sorts, looking at practice, education, music, nonverbal communication, perception, and interaction. It will be of interest to students of African Diaspora culture, performance, sport, and anthropology. For anyone who has wondered how physical training affects our perceptions, this close study of capoeira will open new avenues for understanding how culture shapes the ways we carry ourselves and see the world.

Afro-Mexico

Afro-Mexico

Dancing Between Myth and Reality

  • Author: Anita González
  • Publisher: University of Texas Press
  • ISBN: 0292723245
  • Category: Social Science
  • Page: 163
  • View: 3012
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While Africans and their descendants have lived in Mexico for centuries, many Afro-Mexicans do not consider themselves to be either black or African. For almost a century, Mexico has promoted an ideal of its citizens as having a combination of indigenous and European ancestry. This obscures the presence of African, Asian, and other populations that have contributed to the growth of the nation. However, performance studies—of dance, music, and theatrical events—reveal the influence of African people and their cultural productions on Mexican society. In this work, Anita González articulates African ethnicity and artistry within the broader panorama of Mexican culture by featuring dance events that are performed either by Afro-Mexicans or by other ethnic Mexican groups about Afro-Mexicans. She illustrates how dance reflects upon social histories and relationships and documents how residents of some sectors of Mexico construct their histories through performance. Festival dances and, sometimes, professional staged dances point to a continuing negotiation among Native American, Spanish, African, and other ethnic identities within the evolving nation of Mexico. These performances embody the mobile histories of ethnic encounters because each dance includes a spectrum of characters based upon local situations and historical memories.

Tango

Tango

The Art History of Love

  • Author: Robert Farris Thompson
  • Publisher: Vintage
  • ISBN: 0307498220
  • Category: Performing Arts
  • Page: 384
  • View: 3971
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In this generously illustrated book, world-renowned Yale art historian Robert Farris Thompson gives us the definitive account of tango, "the fabulous dance of the past hundred years–and the most beautiful, in the opinion of Martha Graham.” Thompson traces tango’s evolution in the nineteenth century under European, Andalusian-Gaucho, and African influences through its representations by Hollywood and dramatizations in dance halls throughout the world. He shows us tango not only as brilliant choreography but also as text, music, art, and philosophy of life. Passionately argued and unparalleled in its research, its synthesis, and its depth of understanding, Tango: The Art History of Love is a monumental achievement. From the Trade Paperback edition.

For Glory and Bolívar

For Glory and Bolívar

The Remarkable Life of Manuela Sáenz

  • Author: Pamela S. Murray
  • Publisher: University of Texas Press
  • ISBN: 0292778716
  • Category: Biography & Autobiography
  • Page: 238
  • View: 8215
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She was a friend, lover, and confidante of charismatic Spanish American independence hero Simón Bolívar and, after her death, a nationalist icon in her own right. Yet authors generally have chosen either to romanticize Manuela Sáenz or to discount her altogether. For Glory and Bolivar: The Remarkable of Life of Manuela Sáenz, by contrast, offers a comprehensive and clear-eyed biography of her. Based on unprecedented archival research, it paints a vivid portrait of the Quito-born "Libertadora," revealing both an exceptional figure and a flesh-and-blood person whose life broadly reflected the experiences of women during Spanish America's turbulent Age of Revolution. Already married at the time of her meeting with the famous Liberator, Sáenz abandoned her husband in order to become not only Bolívar's romantic companion, but also his official archivist, a member of his inner circle, and one of his most loyal followers. She played a central role in Spanish South America's independence drama and eventually in developments leading to the consolidation of new nations. Pamela Murray, for the first time, closely examines Sáenz's political trajectory including her vital, often-overlooked years in exile. She exposes the myths that still surround her. She offers, in short, a nuanced and much-needed historical perspective, one that balances recognition of Sáenz's uniqueness with awareness of the broader forces that shaped this dynamic nineteenth-century woman.

King Peggy

King Peggy

An American Secretary, Her Royal Destiny, and the Inspiring Story of How She Changed an African Village

  • Author: Peggielene Bartels,Eleanor Herman
  • Publisher: Anchor
  • ISBN: 0307742814
  • Category: Biography & Autobiography
  • Page: 368
  • View: 4749
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Documents the story of how an American secretary was declared the monarch of a small fishing village on Ghana's central coast, recounting the challenges she faced in improving local circumstances, providing education and countering regional corruption. 100,000 first printing.

No Future

No Future

Punk, Politics and British Youth Culture, 1976–1984

  • Author: Matthew Worley
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press
  • ISBN: 1107176891
  • Category: History
  • Page: 310
  • View: 4094
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An innovative history of British youth culture during the 1970s and 1980s, charting the full spectrum of punk's cultural development.

Soul Music

Soul Music

Tracking the Spiritual Roots of Pop from Plato to Motown

  • Author: Joel Rudinow
  • Publisher: University of Michigan Press
  • ISBN: 0472022792
  • Category: Music
  • Page: 250
  • View: 6918
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"Exceptionally illuminating and philosophically sophisticated." ---Ted Cohen, Professor of Philosophy, University of Chicago "In this audacious and long-awaited book, Joel Rudinow takes seriously a range of interrelated issues that most music theorizing is embarrassed to tackle. People often ask me about music and spirituality. With Soul Music, I can finally recommend a book that offers genuine philosophical insight into the topic." ---Theodore Gracyk, Professor of Philosophy, Minnesota State University Moorhead The idea is as strange as it is commonplace---that the "soul" in soul music is more than just a name, that somehow the music truly taps into something essential rooted in the spiritual notion of the soul itself. Or is it strange? From the civil rights movement and beyond, soul music has played a key, indisputable role in moments of national healing. Of course, American popular music has long been embroiled in controversies over its spiritual purity (or lack thereof). But why? However easy it might seem to dismiss these ideas and debates as quaint and merely symbolic, they persist. In Soul Music: Tracking the Spiritual Roots of Pop from Plato to Motown, Joel Rudinow, a philosopher of music, takes these peculiar notions and exposes them to serious scrutiny. How, Rudinow asks, does music truly work upon the soul, individually and collectively? And what does it mean to say that music can be spiritually therapeutic or toxic? This illuminating, meditative exploration leads from the metaphysical idea of the soul to the legend of Robert Johnson to the philosophies of Plato and Leo Strauss to the history of race and racism in American popular culture to current clinical practices of music therapy. Joel Rudinow teaches in the Philosophy and Humanities Departments at Santa Rosa Junior College and is the coauthor of Invitation to Critical Thinking and the coeditor of Ethics and Values in the Information Age.