Search Results for "native-american-artifacts-of-wisconsin"

Native American Artifacts of Wisconsin

Native American Artifacts of Wisconsin

  • Author: Paul Schanen,David Hunzicker
  • Publisher: N.A
  • ISBN: 9781932113686
  • Category: Art
  • Page: 286
  • View: 4147
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Native American Artifacts of Wisconsin is designed to bridge the gap between the professional and amateur archaeologist. In an easy and logical format, it serves as an excellent reference on the prehistoric artifacts found specifically in Wisconsin. The guide provides time periods, detailed drawings, artifact photos, and documented discovery locations quickly and easily, without the reader having to wade through lengthy journal entries or detailed scholarly papers. In addition, Paul Schanen and David Hunzicker provide guidelines to collectors about the importance of documenting the circumstances and locations of their own artifact finds and how best to share this information with others in order to increase our collective knowledge about these priceless, prehistoric artifacts and the populations who created and used them. Only through careful unearthing, detailed documentation and collaborative sharing will we learn about the people(s) that lived thousands of years ago. No doubt much remains for us to discover about Native Americans from the daily tools they used as they farmed, hunted, lived, hoped, dreamed, and died among the very same forests, hills and streams Wisconsin residents call home today.

Reference Encyclopedia of the American Indian

Reference Encyclopedia of the American Indian

  • Author: Barry T. Klein
  • Publisher: Todd Publications
  • ISBN: 9780915344772
  • Category: Social Science
  • Page: 777
  • View: 7470
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Chippewa Falls Wisconsin

Chippewa Falls Wisconsin

  • Author: Jim Schuh
  • Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
  • ISBN: 9780738519319
  • Category: History
  • Page: 128
  • View: 1293
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Long before Jacob Leinenkugel, Edward Rutledge, and William Irvine were associated with Chippewa Falls, Native American people hunted, fished, and gathered the abundant food supplies of the Chippewa area. Through the medium of historic photographs, this book captures the cultural, economic, political, and social history of Chippewa Falls, Wisconsin, from the mid-1800s to the present day.These pages bring to life the people, events, and industries which helped to shape and transform Chippewa Falls. With more than 200 vintage images, Chippewa Falls, Wisconsin includes the largest sawmill in the world under one roof, some of the earliest residents of the community, along with century-old nationally renowned businesses. There was rarely a dull moment in the development of this community's downtown. The Chippewa Falls Main Street program, operating since 1989, has created a grass roots volunteer driven movement to revitalize downtown Chippewa Falls. Over the years, the downtown has undergone renovation projects and investments totaling more than $57 million.Named as one of five Great American Main Street Cities in 1996, Chippewa Falls was listed as one of America's Top 10 Small Towns in Time Magazine in 1997 and designated as One of a Dozen Distinctive Destinations by the National Trust for Historic Preservation in 2000. Join Chippewa Falls Main Street on a fascinating visual journey into the history of Chippewa Falls.

Native America: A State-by-State Historical Encyclopedia [3 volumes]

Native America: A State-by-State Historical Encyclopedia [3 volumes]

A State-by-State Historical Encyclopedia

  • Author: Daniel S. Murphree
  • Publisher: ABC-CLIO
  • ISBN: 0313381275
  • Category: Social Science
  • Page: 1393
  • View: 4038
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Employing innovative research and unique interpretations, these essays provide a fresh perspective on Native American history by focusing on how Indians lived and helped shape each of the United States. • 50 chapters examine the role of Native Americans in the history and development of each state • Contributions from more than 30 distinguished native and nonnative scholars from around the world, each providing a unique perspective on the states and the native peoples who lived there both before and after statehood • A chronology of significant events in Native American history for each state from the pre-colonial period to the present • Extensive, interdisciplinary bibliographies on Native American history in each state

Early Native Americans

Early Native Americans

Prehistoric Demography, Economy, and Technology

  • Author: David L. Browman
  • Publisher: Walter de Gruyter
  • ISBN: 3110824876
  • Category: History
  • Page: 491
  • View: 6832
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Indian relics of northeast Arkansas and southeast Missouri

Indian relics of northeast Arkansas and southeast Missouri

  • Author: James M. Dethrow
  • Publisher: N.A
  • ISBN: N.A
  • Category: History
  • Page: 152
  • View: 8220
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Atlantis in Wisconsin

Atlantis in Wisconsin

New Revelations about the Lost Sunken City

  • Author: Frank Joseph
  • Publisher: Galde Press, Inc.
  • ISBN: 9781880090121
  • Category: History
  • Page: 204
  • View: 6928
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Living with Animals

Living with Animals

Ojibwe Spirit Powers

  • Author: Michael Pomedli
  • Publisher: University of Toronto Press
  • ISBN: 1442667052
  • Category: Social Science
  • Page: 384
  • View: 6282
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Within nineteenth-century Ojibwe/Chippewa medicine societies, and in communities at large, animals are realities and symbols that demonstrate cultural principles of North American Ojibwe nations. Living with Animals presents over 100 images from oral and written sources – including birch bark scrolls, rock art, stories, games, and dreams – in which animals appear as kindred beings, spirit powers, healers, and protectors. Michael Pomedli shows that the principles at play in these sources are not merely evidence of cultural values, but also unique standards brought to treaty signings by Ojibwe leaders. In addition, these principles are norms against which North American treaty interpretations should be reframed. The author provides an important foundation for ongoing treaty negotiations, and for what contemporary Ojibwe cultural figures corroborate as ways of leading a good, integrated life.

The 1992 and 1993 archaeological survey and evaluation of the Bellhaven Estates property, Section 7, town of Algoma, Winnebago County, Wisconsin

The 1992 and 1993 archaeological survey and evaluation of the Bellhaven Estates property, Section 7, town of Algoma, Winnebago County, Wisconsin

further excavations at the Bell (47-Wn-9) and Findeisen (47-Wn-394) sites

  • Author: Jeffery Alan Behm,University of Wisconsin--Oshkosh. Archaeology Laboratory
  • Publisher: N.A
  • ISBN: N.A
  • Category: Social Science
  • Page: 296
  • View: 1940
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The Science of Science Communication II

The Science of Science Communication II

Summary of a Colloquium

  • Author: Arthur M. Sackler Colloquia of the National Academy of Sciences
  • Publisher: National Academies Press
  • ISBN: 0309292018
  • Category: Political Science
  • Page: 138
  • View: 5488
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Successful scientists must be effective communicators within their professions. Without those skills, they could not write papers and funding proposals, give talks and field questions, or teach classes and mentor students. However, communicating with audiences outside their profession - people who may not share scientists' interests, technical background, cultural assumptions, and modes of expression - presents different challenges and requires additional skills. Communication about science in political or social settings differs from discourse within a scientific discipline. Not only are scientists just one of many stakeholders vying for access to the public agenda, but the political debates surrounding science and its applications may sometimes confront scientists with unfamiliar and uncomfortable discussions involving religious values, partisan interests, and even the trustworthiness of science. The Science of Science Communication II is the summary of a Sackler Colloquium convened in September 2013 At this event, leading social, behavioral, and decision scientists, other scientists, and communication practitioners shared current research that can improve the communication of science to lay audiences. In the Sackler Colloquia tradition, the meeting also allowed social and natural scientists to identify new opportunities to collaborate and advance their own research, while improving public engagement with science. Speakers provided evidence-based guidance on how to listen to others so as to identify their information needs, ways of thinking about the world, and the cultural stereotypes regarding scientists. They delved deeply into the incentive systems that shape what scientists study and how they report their work, the subtle changes in framing that can influence how messages are interpreted, the complex channels that determine how messages flow, and the potential politicization of scientific evidence.

Indian Names on Wisconsin's Map

Indian Names on Wisconsin's Map

  • Author: Virgil J. Vogel
  • Publisher: Univ of Wisconsin Press
  • ISBN: 9780299129842
  • Category: History
  • Page: 323
  • View: 8081
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"Of all the states of the American union, none has a name that has been spelled in more ways, or interpreted more variously, than Wisconsin. Among the spellings listed are Mesconsin, Meskousing, Mishkonsing, Ouisconsens, Ouisconsin, Ouisconsing, Ouiscousing, Ouiskonsin, Owisconsing, Quisconsing, Weeskonsan, Wisconsan, Wisconsin, Wishkonsing, and Wiskonsin. The name has been attributed to the French, Menominee, Ojibwa, Potawatami, Sauk-Fox, and Winnebago languages." Place names are cultural artifacts that tell us as much about how people lived as do relics dug from the ground, writes Virgil Vogel, one of America's foremost authorities on place names. They are historical records from which the location and migration of people, plants, and animals can be charted. Onalaska and Aztalan, not surprisingly, are place names transplanted to Wisconsin from the far north and south. Some names tell of topographic features that have long since disappeared or are little noticed today. Beaver Dam once had an Indian name meaning just that; Sheboygan, "big pipe" in Ojibwa, described the shape of a river bend. Other names are vestiges of ancient languages nowhere else recorded. Some commemorate historic events: Winneconne is believed by many to mean "place of the skulls." The Indian names of Wisconsin's towns, rivers, and lakes reveal the minds of the Indian peoples, their cosmic views, their values, their relation to their environment , and their ways of life and convey as well something of the history of their white invaders. Virgil Vogel's thirty years of research into Native American influence on geographical names has resulted in an absorbing account that illuminates the history and culture of Wisconsin Indians. Vogel tells his story thematically—names from the spirit world, names of trails and portages, French-Indian personal names, tribal names, and so on—to show that place names are part of a larger cultural and natural world. In recovering the history and meaning of these names, he has restored an important and colorful part of America's heritage.

The Traveler's Guide to Native America

The Traveler's Guide to Native America

The Great Lakes Region

  • Author: Hayward Allen
  • Publisher: Northword Press
  • ISBN: N.A
  • Category: Travel
  • Page: 192
  • View: 6617
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Studying Wisconsin

Studying Wisconsin

The Life of Increase Lapham, early chronicler of plants, rocks, rivers, mounds and all things Wisconsin

  • Author: Martha Bergland,Paul G. Hayes
  • Publisher: Wisconsin Historical Society
  • ISBN: 0870206494
  • Category: Biography & Autobiography
  • Page: 410
  • View: 5649
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With masterful storytelling, Bergland and Hayes demonstrate how Lapham blended his ravenous curiosity with an equable temperament and a passion for detail to create a legacy that is still relevant today. —John Gurda In this long overdue tribute to Wisconsin’s first scientist, authors Martha Bergland and Paul G. Hayes explore the remarkable life and achievements of Increase Lapham (1811–1875). Lapham’s ability to observe, understand, and meticulously catalog the natural world marked all of his work, from his days as a teenage surveyor on the Erie Canal to his last great contribution as state geologist. Self-taught, Lapham mastered botany, geology, archaeology, limnology, mineralogy, engineering, meteorology, and cartography. A prolific writer, his 1844 guide to the territory was the first book published in Wisconsin. Asked late in life which field of science was his specialty, he replied simply, “I am studying Wisconsin.” Lapham identified and preserved thousands of botanical specimens. He surveyed and mapped Wisconsin’s effigy mounds. He was a force behind the creation of the National Weather Service, lobbying for a storm warning system to protect Great Lakes sailors. Told in compelling detail through Lapham’s letters, journals, books, and articles, Studying Wisconsin chronicles the life and times of Wisconsin’s pioneer citizen-scientist.

Silent arrows; Indian lore and artifact hunting

Silent arrows; Indian lore and artifact hunting

  • Author: Earl F. Moore
  • Publisher: N.A
  • ISBN: N.A
  • Category: History
  • Page: 196
  • View: 1455
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Indian Artifacts of the Rockies

Indian Artifacts of the Rockies

  • Author: Virgil Yates Russell
  • Publisher: N.A
  • ISBN: N.A
  • Category: Indians of North America
  • Page: 112
  • View: 7014
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Whitewater

Whitewater

  • Author: Fred G. Kraege
  • Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
  • ISBN: 1439632871
  • Category: Photography
  • Page: 128
  • View: 2770
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The city of Whitewater was named for the soft, white clay that lined the stream flowing through the area. Later it claimed the motto “the Banner Inland City of the Midwest” and, after that, “Whitewater, the City Beautiful” for its stately homes and large, graceful trees. Samuel Prince, the first settler, erected a cabin on his claim of 60 acres in 1837; a gristmill, sawmill, paper mill, and numerous stores were soon established in this rich agricultural area. The railroad came, and the manufacturing of the Esterly Grain Harvester and the Whitewater Wagon made Whitewater an industrial town. In 1868, the state’s second normal school—later the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater—located here, further changing the town’s character.

Rascal, der Waschbär

Rascal, der Waschbär

  • Author: Sterling North
  • Publisher: N.A
  • ISBN: 9783596806102
  • Category:
  • Page: 207
  • View: 2702
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American Indian axes and related stone artifacts

American Indian axes and related stone artifacts

  • Author: Lar Hothem
  • Publisher: N.A
  • ISBN: N.A
  • Category: Antiques & Collectibles
  • Page: 214
  • View: 8209
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Aztalan

Aztalan

Mysteries of an Ancient Indian Town

  • Author: Robert A. Birmingham,Lynne Goldstein
  • Publisher: Wisconsin Historical Society
  • ISBN: 0870205188
  • Category: Social Science
  • Page: 152
  • View: 6472
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Aztalan has remained a mystery since the early nineteenth century when it was discovered by settlers who came to the Crawfish River, fifty miles west of Milwaukee. Who were the early indigenous people who inhabited this place? When did they live here? Why did they disappear? Birmingham and Goldstein attempt to unlock some of the mysteries, providing insights and information about the group of people who first settled here in 1100 AD. Filled with maps, drawings, and photographs of artifacts, this small volume examines a time before modern Native American people settled in this area.

Native People of Wisconsin

Native People of Wisconsin

  • Author: Patty Loew
  • Publisher: Wisconsin Historical Society
  • ISBN: N.A
  • Category: Education
  • Page: 136
  • View: 4331
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Introduces the twelve Indian nations that live in Wisconsin, presenting tribal stories that incorporate various ways Native people remember the past, and emphasizing the value of oral tradition.