Search Results for "negro-education-in-alabama"

Negro Education in Alabama

Negro Education in Alabama

A Study in Cotton and Steel

  • Author: Horace Mann Bond
  • Publisher: University of Alabama Press
  • ISBN: 0817307346
  • Category: Education
  • Page: 383
  • View: 7891
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Horace Mann Bond (1904-1972) was a scholar and a college administrator who focused on higher education for African Americans. Negro Education in Alabama is derived from his dissertation, which received the Susan Colver Rosenberger Prize in 1937 and was published in 1939. “Horace Mann Bond,” according to Sourthen Changes, “lived, worked, and wrote in both the South and the North during the reign of Jim Crow, and through the early years of its aftermath….Bond was a bright, gifted, young scholar, on track to become a serious academic,” when his career shifted to educational administration. The promise of his career as a scholar is exemplified in Negro Education in Alabama, which has a remarkably contemporary ring.

The Star Creek Papers

The Star Creek Papers

  • Author: Horace Mann Bond
  • Publisher: University of Georgia Press
  • ISBN: 0820340235
  • Category: Social Science
  • Page: 200
  • View: 723
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The Star Creek Papers is the never-before-published account of the complex realities of race relations in the rural South in the 1930s. When Horace and Julia Bond moved to Louisiana in 1934, they entered a world where the legacy of slavery was miscegenation, lingering paternalism, and deadly racism. The Bonds were a young, well-educated and idealistic African American couple working for the Rosenwald Fund, a trust established by a northern philanthropist to build schools in rural areas. They were part of the "Explorer Project" sent to investigate the progress of the school in the Star Creek district of Washington Parish. Their report, which decried the teachers' lack of experience, the poor quality of the coursework, and the students' chronic absenteeism, was based on their private journal, "The Star Creek Diary," a shrewdly observed, sharply etched, and affectionate portrait of a rural black community. Horace Bond was moved to write a second document, "Forty Acres and a Mule," a history of a black farming family, after Jerome Wilson was lynched in 1935. The Wilsons were thrifty landowners whom Bond knew and respected; he intended to turn their story into a book, but the chronicle remained unfinished at his death. These important primary documents were rediscovered by civil rights scholar Adam Fairclough, who edited them with Julia Bond's support.

Beside the Troubled Waters

Beside the Troubled Waters

A Black Doctor Remembers Life, Medicine, and Civil Rights in an Alabama Town

  • Author: Sonnie W. Hereford,Jack D. Ellis
  • Publisher: University of Alabama Press
  • ISBN: 081731721X
  • Category: Biography & Autobiography
  • Page: 177
  • View: 5114
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A black southern doctor offers a gripping memoir of his childhood in Alabama, his efforts to overcome racism in the white medical community, his participation in the civil rights movement and his problems with the Medicaid program and state medical authorities.

An educational study of Alabama

An educational study of Alabama

  • Author: United States. Bureau of Education,United States. Office of Education
  • Publisher: N.A
  • ISBN: N.A
  • Category: Educational surveys
  • Page: 522
  • View: 7507
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The Harvard Guide to African-American History

The Harvard Guide to African-American History

  • Author: Evelyn Brooks Higginbotham,Leon F. Litwack,Darlene Clark Hine
  • Publisher: Harvard University Press
  • ISBN: 9780674002760
  • Category: Social Science
  • Page: 923
  • View: 7732
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Compiles information and interpretations on the past 500 years of African American history, containing essays on historical research aids, bibliographies, resources for womens' issues, and an accompanying CD-ROM providing bibliographical entries.

Race and Schooling in the South, 1880-1950

Race and Schooling in the South, 1880-1950

An Economic History

  • Author: Robert A. Margo
  • Publisher: University of Chicago Press
  • ISBN: 9780226505015
  • Category: History
  • Page: 174
  • View: 7762
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The interrelation among race, schooling, and labor market opportunities of American blacks can help us make sense of the relatively poor economic status of blacks in contemporary society. The role of these factors in slavery and the economic consequences for blacks has received much attention, but the post-slave experience of blacks in the American economy has been less studied. To deepen our understanding of that experience, Robert A. Margo mines a wealth of newly available census data and school district records. By analyzing evidence concerning occupational discrimination, educational expenditures, taxation, and teachers' salaries, he clarifies the costs for blacks of post-slave segregation. "A concise, lucid account of the bases of racial inequality in the South between Reconstruction and the Civil Rights era. . . . Deserves the careful attention of anyone concerned with historical and contemporary race stratification."—Kathryn M. Neckerman, Contemporary Sociology "Margo has produced an excellent study, which can serve as a model for aspiring cliometricians. To describe it as 'required reading' would fail to indicate just how important, indeed indispensable, the book will be to scholars interested in racial economic differences, past or present."—Robert Higgs, Journal of Economic Literature "Margo shows that history is important in understanding present domestic problems; his study has significant implications for understanding post-1950s black economic development."—Joe M. Richardson, Journal of American History

Schools in the Landscape

Schools in the Landscape

Localism, Cultural Tradition, and the Development of Alabama's Public Education System, 1865-1915

  • Author: Edith Ziegler
  • Publisher: University of Alabama Press
  • ISBN: 0817317090
  • Category: Education
  • Page: 217
  • View: 3029
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This richly researched and impressively argued work is a history of public schooling in Alabama in the half century following the Civil War. It engages with depth and sophistication Alabama’s social and cultural life in the period that can be characterized by the three “R”s: Reconstruction, redemption, and racism. Alabama was a mostly rural, relatively poor, and culturally conservative state, and its schools reflected the assumptions of that society.

Cutting School

Cutting School

Privatization, Segregation, and the End of Public Education

  • Author: Noliwe Rooks
  • Publisher: The New Press
  • ISBN: 1620972492
  • Category: Education
  • Page: 256
  • View: 7617
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A timely indictment of the corporate takeover of education and the privatization—and profitability—of separate and unequal schools, published at a critical time in the dismantling of public education in America Public schools are among America’s greatest achievements in modern history, yet from the earliest days of tax-supported education—today a sector with an estimated budget of over half a billion dollars—there have been intractable tensions tied to race and poverty. Now, in an era characterized by levels of school segregation the country has not seen since the mid-twentieth century, cultural critic and American studies professor Noliwe Rooks provides a trenchant analysis of our separate and unequal schools and argues that profiting from our nation’s failure to provide a high-quality education to all children has become a very big business. Cutting School deftly traces the financing of segregated education in America, from reconstruction through Brown v. Board of Education up to the current controversies around school choice, teacher quality, the school-to-prison pipeline, and more, to elucidate the course we are on today: the wholesale privatization of our schools. Rooks’s incisive critique breaks down the fraught landscape of “segrenomics,” showing how experimental solutions to the so-called achievement gaps—including charters, vouchers, and cyber schools—rely on, profit from, and ultimately exacerbate disturbingly high levels of racial and economic segregation under the guise of providing equal opportunity. Rooks chronicles the making and unmaking of public education and the disastrous impact of funneling public dollars to private for-profit and nonprofit operations. As the infrastructure crumbles, a number of major U.S. cities are poised to permanently dismantle their public school systems—the very foundation of our multicultural democracy. Yet Rooks finds hope and promise in the inspired individuals and powerful movements fighting to save urban schools. A comprehensive, compelling account of what’s truly at stake in the relentless push to deregulate and privatize, Cutting School is a cri de coeur for all of us to resist educational apartheid in America.

The Mis-education of the Negro

The Mis-education of the Negro

  • Author: Carter Godwin Woodson
  • Publisher: ReadaClassic.com
  • ISBN: N.A
  • Category: African Americans
  • Page: 207
  • View: 4322
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Woodson's classic work of criticism explores how the education received by blacks has failed to give them an appreciation of themselves as a race and their contributions to history. Woodson puts forward a program that calls for the educated to learn about their past and serve the black community. (Education/Teaching)

More Than Science and Sputnik

More Than Science and Sputnik

The National Defense Education Act of 1958

  • Author: Wayne J. Urban
  • Publisher: University of Alabama Press
  • ISBN: 0817316914
  • Category: Education
  • Page: 247
  • View: 4021
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they believed the act was needed. --Book Jacket.

Notable Black American Women

Notable Black American Women

  • Author: Jessie Carney Smith
  • Publisher: VNR AG
  • ISBN: 9780810391772
  • Category: Reference
  • Page: 775
  • View: 4247
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Provides brief biographies of business executives, writers, journalists, lawyers, physicians, actresses, singers, musicians, artists, educators, religious leaders, civil rights activists, politicians, aviators, athletes, and scientists

Jim Crow's Children

Jim Crow's Children

The Broken Promise of the Brown Decision

  • Author: Peter Irons
  • Publisher: Penguin
  • ISBN: 1440626502
  • Category: History
  • Page: 400
  • View: 7270
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Peter Irons, acclaimed historian and author of A People History of the Supreme Court, explores of one of the supreme court's most important decisions and its disappointing aftermath In 1954 the U.S. Supreme Court sounded the death knell for school segregation with its decision in Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka. So goes the conventional wisdom. Weaving together vivid portraits of lawyers and such judges as Thurgood Marshall and Earl Warren, sketches of numerous black children throughout history whose parents joined lawsuits against Jim Crow schools, and gripping courtroom drama scenes, Irons shows how the erosion of the Brown decision—especially by the Court’s rulings over the past three decades—has led to the “resegregation” of public education in America.

A Class of Their Own

A Class of Their Own

Black teachers in the segregated South

  • Author: Adam Fairclough
  • Publisher: Harvard University Press
  • ISBN: 0674036662
  • Category: History
  • Page: 552
  • View: 7411
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In this major undertaking, civil rights historian Adam Fairclough chronicles the odyssey of black teachers in the South from emancipation in 1865 to integration one hundred years later. A Class of Their Own is indispensable for understanding how blacks and whites interacted after the abolition of slavery, and how black communities coped with the challenges of freedom and oppression.

A Right to Read

A Right to Read

Segregation and Civil Rights in Alabama's Public Libraries, 1900–1965

  • Author: Patterson Toby Graham
  • Publisher: University of Alabama Press
  • ISBN: 0817311440
  • Category: History
  • Page: 191
  • View: 8018
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Graham focuses on Alabama, where African Americans, denied access to white libraries, worked to establish and maintain their own "Negro branches." These libraries - separate but never equal - were always underfunded and inadequately prepared to meet the needs of their constituencies."--Jacket.

Black Like Me

Black Like Me

  • Author: John Howard Griffin,Robert Bonazzi
  • Publisher: Penguin
  • ISBN: 0451234219
  • Category: Biography & Autobiography
  • Page: 200
  • View: 512
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A white writer recounts his experiences in the American South following treatments that darkened his skin and shares his thoughts on the problems of prejudice and racial injustice.

Anna's Shtetl

Anna's Shtetl

  • Author: Lawrence A. Coben
  • Publisher: University of Alabama Press
  • ISBN: 0817356738
  • Category: Biography & Autobiography
  • Page: 263
  • View: 6486
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A rare view of a childhood in a European ghetto. Anna Spector was born in 1905 in Korsun, a Ukrainian town on the Ros River, eighty miles south of Kiev. Held by Poland until 1768 and annexed by the Tsar in 1793 Korsun and its fluid ethnic population were characteristic of the Pale of Settlement in Eastern Europe: comprised of Ukrainians, Cossacks, Jews and other groups living uneasily together in relationships punctuated by violence. Anna’s father left Korsun in 1912 to immigrate to America, and Anna left in 1919, having lived through the Great War, the Bolshevik Revolution, and part of the ensuing civil war, as well as several episodes of more or less organized pogroms—deadly anti-Jewish riots begun by various invading military detachments during the Russian Civil War and joined by some of Korsun’s peasants. In the early 1990s Anna met Lawrence A. Coben, a medical doctor seeking information about the shtetls to recapture a sense of his own heritage. Anna had near-perfect recall of her daily life as a girl and young woman in the last days in one of those historic but doomed communities. Her rare account, the product of some 300 interviews, is valuable because most personal memoirs of ghetto life are written by men. Also, very often, Christian neighbors appear in ghetto accounts as a stolid peasant mass assembled on market days, as destructive mobs, or as an arrogant and distant collection of government officials and nobility. Anna’s story is exceptionally rich in a sense of the Korsun Christians as friends, neighbors, and individuals. Although the Jewish communities in Eastern Europe are now virtually gone, less than 100 years ago they counted a population of millions. The firsthand records we have from that lost world are therefore important, and this view from the underrecorded lives of women and the young is particularly welcome.

They Had No Voice

They Had No Voice

My Fight for Alabama's Forgotten Children

  • Author: Denny Abbott,Douglas Kalajian,John Walsh
  • Publisher: NewSouth Books
  • ISBN: 1603062092
  • Category: Biography & Autobiography
  • Page: 103
  • View: 1870
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Denny Abbott first encountered the Alabama Industrial School for Negro Children at Mt. Meigs as a twenty-one-year-old probation officer for the Montgomery County Family Court. He would became so concerned about conditions for black juvenile offenders there -- including hard labor, beatings, and rape -- that he took the State of Alabama to court to win reforms. With the help of the U.S. Justice Department, Abbott won a resounding victory that brought change, although three years later he had to sue the state again. In They Had No Voice, Abbott details these battles and how his actions cost him his job and made him a pariah in his hometown, but resulted in better lives for Alabama's children. Abbott also tells of his later career as the first national director of the Adam Walsh Child Resource Center, where he helped focus attention on missing and exploited children and became widely recognized as an expert on children's issues.

Twenty-Five Years in the Black Belt

Twenty-Five Years in the Black Belt

  • Author: William J. Edwards
  • Publisher: University of Alabama Press
  • ISBN: 0817307168
  • Category: Biography & Autobiography
  • Page: 150
  • View: 1219
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In 1893, Edwards toured Wilcox, Monroe, Butler and Dallas counties and found a large black population in need of liberal and practical education. As a result, he founded Snow Hill Institute and was its principal for 31 years. He wrote this book in 1918, when the school was 25 years old.

The movable school goes to the Negro farmer

The movable school goes to the Negro farmer

  • Author: Thomas Monroe Campbell
  • Publisher: N.A
  • ISBN: N.A
  • Category: Social Science
  • Page: 170
  • View: 1289
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Separate and Unequal

Separate and Unequal

Public School Campaigns and Racism in the Southern Seaboard States, 1901-1915

  • Author: Louis R. Harlan
  • Publisher: UNC Press Books
  • ISBN: 0807879738
  • Category: History
  • Page: 304
  • View: 4221
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This is a revealing study of the crucial period in the educational development of the South as it involved the separate but equal" doctrine. It is based on extensive research in newspapers, public documents, official reports, and manuscripts, and it provides detailed evidence that the states studied ignored their obligations to black schools under this doctrine." Originally published in 1958. A UNC Press Enduring Edition -- UNC Press Enduring Editions use the latest in digital technology to make available again books from our distinguished backlist that were previously out of print. These editions are published unaltered from the original, and are presented in affordable paperback formats, bringing readers both historical and cultural value.