Search Results for "racecraft"

Racecraft

Racecraft

The Soul of Inequality in American Life

  • Author: Karen E. Fields,Barbara Jeanne Fields
  • Publisher: Verso Trade
  • ISBN: 1781683131
  • Category: Political Science
  • Page: 304
  • View: 8074
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Challenges popular conceptions about racism to explain its pervasiveness in economic doctrine, politics and everyday thinking, arguing that America must develop a legitimate language for thinking about and discussing inequality in broad terms in order to achieve a post-racial society. Co-written by the author of Free at Last.

Racecraft: The Soul of Inequality in American Life

Racecraft: The Soul of Inequality in American Life

  • Author: Karen Fields,Barbara J. Fields
  • Publisher: Verso Books
  • ISBN: 1844679942
  • Category: Political Science
  • Page: 302
  • View: 4066
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The election of Barack Obama was supposed to herald the dawn of a post-racial age in America—a meaningless term without a grasp of what "racial" means. Most people assume that racism grows from the perception of human difference: the fact of race gives rise to the practice of racism. In this myth-busting reflection, the sociologist Karen E. Fields and the historian Barbara J. Fields argue the opposite: the practice of racism produces the illusion of race, through what they call racecraft. And racecraft is intimately entwined with other forms of inequality in American life. So pervasive are the devices of racecraft in American history, economic doctrine, politics, and everyday thinking that the presence of racecraft itself goes unnoticed. That the post-racial age has not dawned, the Fieldses argue, reflects the failure of Americans to develop a legitimate language for thinking about and discussing inequality across the board. That failure should worry all who care about democratic institutions.

Racecraft

Racecraft

The Soul of Inequality in American Life

  • Author: Barbara J. Fields,Karen Fields
  • Publisher: Verso Books
  • ISBN: 1844679950
  • Category: Social Science
  • Page: 310
  • View: 9218
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Most people assume that racism grows from a perception of human difference: the fact of race gives rise to the practice of racism. Sociologist Karen E. Fields and historian Barbara J. Fields argue otherwise: the practice of racism produces the illusion of race, through what they call “racecraft.” And this phenomenon is intimately entwined with other forms of inequality in American life. So pervasive are the devices of racecraft in American history, economic doctrine, politics, and everyday thinking that the presence of racecraft itself goes unnoticed. That the promised post-racial age has not dawned, the authors argue, reflects the failure of Americans to develop a legitimate language for thinking about and discussing inequality. That failure should worry everyone who cares about democratic institutions.

Race to Win

Race to Win

How to Become a Complete Champion Driver

  • Author: Derek Daly
  • Publisher: Motorbooks International
  • ISBN: 9780760331859
  • Category: Sports & Recreation
  • Page: 256
  • View: 9787
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The keys to success and the principles of high performance from world-class race car driver, commentator, and entrepreneur Derek Daly.

The Predicament of Blackness

The Predicament of Blackness

Postcolonial Ghana and the Politics of Race

  • Author: Jemima Pierre
  • Publisher: University of Chicago Press
  • ISBN: 0226923029
  • Category: History
  • Page: 263
  • View: 8618
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What is the meaning of blackness in Africa? While much has been written on Africa’s complex ethnic and tribal relationships, Jemima Pierre’s groundbreaking The Predicament of Blackness is the first book to tackle the question of race in West Africa through its postcolonial manifestations. Challenging the view of the African continent as a nonracialized space—as a fixed historic source for the African diaspora—she envisions Africa, and in particular the nation of Ghana, as a place whose local relationships are deeply informed by global structures of race, economics, and politics. Against the backdrop of Ghana’s history as a major port in the transatlantic slave trade and the subsequent and disruptive forces of colonialism and postcolonialism, Pierre examines key facets of contemporary Ghanaian society, from the pervasive significance of “whiteness” to the practice of chemical skin-bleaching to the government’s active promotion of Pan-African “heritage tourism.” Drawing these and other examples together, she shows that race and racism have not only persisted in Ghana after colonialism, but also that the beliefs and practices of this modern society all occur within a global racial hierarchy. In doing so, she provides a powerful articulation of race on the continent and a new way of understanding contemporary Africa—and the modern African diaspora.

Metal Fabricator's Handbook

Metal Fabricator's Handbook

  • Author: Ron Fournier,Sue Fournier
  • Publisher: Penguin
  • ISBN: 9780895868701
  • Category: Transportation
  • Page: 176
  • View: 9580
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Winner of the prestigious Moto Award for "Best Technical How-to Book" in 1984, the METAL FABRICATOR'S HANDBOOK applies master metal craftsman Ron Fournier's unique metal fabricating skills--developed during years of building Indy cars, drag racers, stockers, custom show cars, and sports GT race cars. Covers MIG, TIG, arc- and gas-welding, fuel and oil tanks, exhaust headers, and much more.

Sports Car and Competition Driving

Sports Car and Competition Driving

  • Author: Paul Frère
  • Publisher: Pickle Partners Publishing
  • ISBN: 1787200663
  • Category: Transportation
  • Page: 119
  • View: 7745
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This practical manual been written for the car-owner who is already a competent driver under normal road conditions but who would like to be a better-than-average driver, and especially for the man who wishes to try his hand at competition work—both racing and rallying. Paul Frère—Grand Prix driver and engineer, Le Mans winner and author—gives invaluable instruction based on his many years of experience on the racing circuits of Europe and America. He deals briefly with theoretical matters and then proceeds with his driving lessons: making the most of practice; learning a circuit; racing starts; cut-off and braking points; slides and drifts; taking advantage of road camber; passing and being passed; slipstreaming; driving under wet and icy conditions and racing at night. He also gives practical advice on race tactics, flag marshals, time keeping, pit signals, race wear, seat belts, the choice of gear ratios and tyres and the different problems posed by road and track racing. With the aid of 60 photographs and diagrams M. Frère explains the correct line to take on various types of corners and why, the effects of peculiarities of surface, and analyses the forces acting on a car in cornering. The book is “required reading” for every ambitious driver in Club and Formula Junior racing and for Rallymen.

Drive to Win

Drive to Win

Essential Guide to Race Driving

  • Author: Carroll Smith
  • Publisher: Carroll Smith Consulting
  • ISBN: 9780615592572
  • Category: Transportation
  • Page: 174
  • View: 6165
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Take pole position to learn the ground rules, techniques and procedures of driving perception and evaluation. Racing professional Carroll Smith delivers current state-of-the-art techniques for working with your crew to develop and set up your car so that you'll have a competitive tool with which to practice the art of driving.

Between the World and Me

Between the World and Me

  • Author: Ta-Nehisi Coates
  • Publisher: Spiegel & Grau
  • ISBN: 0679645985
  • Category: Biography & Autobiography
  • Page: 176
  • View: 9392
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Hailed by Toni Morrison as “required reading,” a bold and personal literary exploration of America’s racial history by “the single best writer on the subject of race in the United States” (The New York Observer) #1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER | NATIONAL BOOK AWARD WINNER | NAACP IMAGE AWARD WINNER | PULITZER PRIZE FINALIST | NATIONAL BOOK CRITICS CIRCLE AWARD FINALIST | NAMED ONE OF THE TEN BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY The New York Times Book Review • O: The Oprah Magazine • The Washington Post • People • Entertainment Weekly • Vogue • Los Angeles Times • San Francisco Chronicle • Chicago Tribune • New York • Newsday • Library Journal • Publishers Weekly In a profound work that pivots from the biggest questions about American history and ideals to the most intimate concerns of a father for his son, Ta-Nehisi Coates offers a powerful new framework for understanding our nation’s history and current crisis. Americans have built an empire on the idea of “race,” a falsehood that damages us all but falls most heavily on the bodies of black women and men—bodies exploited through slavery and segregation, and, today, threatened, locked up, and murdered out of all proportion. What is it like to inhabit a black body and find a way to live within it? And how can we all honestly reckon with this fraught history and free ourselves from its burden? Between the World and Me is Ta-Nehisi Coates’s attempt to answer these questions in a letter to his adolescent son. Coates shares with his son—and readers—the story of his awakening to the truth about his place in the world through a series of revelatory experiences, from Howard University to Civil War battlefields, from the South Side of Chicago to Paris, from his childhood home to the living rooms of mothers whose children’s lives were taken as American plunder. Beautifully woven from personal narrative, reimagined history, and fresh, emotionally charged reportage, Between the World and Me clearly illuminates the past, bracingly confronts our present, and offers a transcendent vision for a way forward. Praise for Between the World and Me “Powerful . . . a searing meditation on what it means to be black in America today.”—Michiko Kakutani, The New York Times “Eloquent . . . in the tradition of James Baldwin with echoes of Ralph Ellison’s Invisible Man . . . an autobiography of the black body in America.”—The Boston Globe “Brilliant . . . [Coates] is firing on all cylinders.”—The Washington Post “Urgent, lyrical, and devastating . . . a new classic of our time.”—Vogue “A crucial book during this moment of generational awakening.”—The New Yorker “Titanic and timely . . . essential reading.”—Entertainment Weekly

Displaced Allegories

Displaced Allegories

Post-Revolutionary Iranian Cinema

  • Author: Negar Mottahedeh
  • Publisher: Duke University Press
  • ISBN: 0822381192
  • Category: Performing Arts
  • Page: 215
  • View: 3549
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Following the 1979 Iranian Revolution, Iran’s film industry, in conforming to the Islamic Republic’s system of modesty, had to ensure that women on-screen were veiled from the view of men. This prevented Iranian filmmakers from making use of the desiring gaze, a staple cinematic system of looking. In Displaced Allegories Negar Mottahedeh shows that post-Revolutionary Iranian filmmakers were forced to create a new visual language for conveying meaning to audiences. She argues that the Iranian film industry found creative ground not in the negation of government regulations but in the camera’s adoption of the modest, averted gaze. In the process, the filmic techniques and cinematic technologies were gendered as feminine and the national cinema was produced as a woman’s cinema. Mottahedeh asserts that, in response to the prohibitions against the desiring look, a new narrative cinema emerged as the displaced allegory of the constraints on the post-Revolutionary Iranian film industry. Allegorical commentary was not developed in the explicit content of cinematic narratives but through formal innovations. Offering close readings of the work of the nationally popular and internationally renowned Iranian auteurs Bahram Bayza’i, Abbas Kiarostami, and Mohsen Makhmalbaf, Mottahedeh illuminates the formal codes and conventions of post-Revolutionary Iranian films. She insists that such analyses of cinema’s visual codes and conventions are crucial to the study of international film. As Mottahedeh points out, the discipline of film studies has traditionally seen film as a medium that communicates globally because of its dependence on a (Hollywood) visual language assumed to be universal and legible across national boundaries. Displaced Allegories demonstrates that visual language is not necessarily universal; it is sometimes deeply informed by national culture and politics.

Interrupted Life

Interrupted Life

Experiences of Incarcerated Women in the United States

  • Author: Rickie Solinger
  • Publisher: Univ of California Press
  • ISBN: 0520252497
  • Category: History
  • Page: 458
  • View: 3013
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"Striking, original, and stimulating. Even readers with extensive familiarity of the literature regarding women in prison will learn something new."--Mona Danner, Ph.D. Professor of Sociology and Criminal Justice

Don't Eat This Book

Don't Eat This Book

Fast Food and the Supersizing of America

  • Author: Morgan Spurlock
  • Publisher: Penguin
  • ISBN: 1101666633
  • Category: Health & Fitness
  • Page: 320
  • View: 1531
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For thirty days, Morgan Spurlock ate nothing but McDonald’s as part of an investigation into the effects of fast food on American health. The resulting documentary earned him an Academy Award nomination and broke box-office records worldwide. But there’s more to the story, and in Don’t Eat This Book, Spurlock examines everything from school lunch programs and the marketing of fast food to the decline of physical education. He looks at why fast food is so tasty, cheap, and ultimately seductive—and interviews experts from surgeons general and kids to marketing gurus and lawmakers, who share their research and opinions on what we can do to offset a health crisis of supersized proportions. Don’t eat this groundbreaking, hilarious book—but if you care about your country’s health, your children’s, and your own, you better read it.

Race-ing Justice, En-gendering Power

Race-ing Justice, En-gendering Power

Essays on Anita Hill, Clarence Thomas, and the Construction of Social Reality

  • Author: Homi K. Bhabha,Kimberlé Crenshaw,Margaret A. Burnham,Paula Giddings,A. Leon Higginbotham,Claudia Brodsky Lacour,Wahneema H. Lubiano,Manning Marable,Nellie Y. McKay,Nell Irvin Painter,Gayle Pemberton,Andrew Ross,Christine Stansell,Carol Miller Swain,Michael Thelwell,Kendall Thomas,Cornel West,Patricia J. Williams
  • Publisher: Pantheon
  • ISBN: 0679741453
  • Category: Political Science
  • Page: 475
  • View: 6791
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Eighteen essays by prominent scholars reflect on the cultural, historical, political, personal, legal, sexual, and linguistic implications of the Thomas hearings and Hill's accusations

North to the Night

North to the Night

A Spiritual Odyssey in the Arctic

  • Author: Alvah Simon
  • Publisher: Broadway
  • ISBN: 076790446X
  • Category: Sports & Recreation
  • Page: 328
  • View: 7340
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An account of one couple's journey around the Arctic Circle by sailboat, a trip that becomes a nightmare as the wife must leave her husband to face the long Arctic night alone

A Dreadful Deceit

A Dreadful Deceit

The Myth of Race from the Colonial Era to ObamaÕs America

  • Author: Jacqueline Jones
  • Publisher: Basic Books
  • ISBN: 0465036708
  • Category: History
  • Page: 400
  • View: 8580
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In 1656, a Maryland planter tortured and killed an enslaved man named Antonio, an Angolan who refused to work in the fields. Three hundred years later, Simon P. Owens battled soul-deadening technologies as well as the fiction of “race” that divided him from his co-workers in a Detroit auto-assembly plant. Separated by time and space, Antonio and Owens nevertheless shared a distinct kind of political vulnerability; they lacked rights and opportunities in societies that accorded marked privileges to people labeled “white.” An American creation myth posits that these two black men were the victims of “racial” discrimination, a primal prejudice that the United States has haltingly but gradually repudiated over the course of many generations. In A Dreadful Deceit, award-winning historian Jacqueline Jones traces the lives of Antonio, Owens, and four other African Americans to illustrate the strange history of “race” in America. In truth, Jones shows, race does not exist, and the very factors that we think of as determining it— a person’s heritage or skin color—are mere pretexts for the brutalization of powerless people by the powerful. Jones shows that for decades, southern planters did not even bother to justify slavery by invoking the concept of race; only in the late eighteenth century did whites begin to rationalize the exploitation and marginalization of blacks through notions of “racial” difference. Indeed, race amounted to a political strategy calculated to defend overt forms of discrimination, as revealed in the stories of Boston King, a fugitive in Revolutionary South Carolina; Elleanor Eldridge, a savvy but ill-starred businesswoman in antebellum Providence, Rhode Island; Richard W. White, a Union veteran and Republican politician in post-Civil War Savannah; and William Holtzclaw, founder of an industrial school for blacks in Mississippi, where many whites opposed black schooling of any kind. These stories expose the fluid, contingent, and contradictory idea of race, and the disastrous effects it has had, both in the past and in our own supposedly post-racial society. Expansive, visionary, and provocative, A Dreadful Deceit explodes the pernicious fiction that has shaped four centuries of American history.

Life Is So Good

Life Is So Good

  • Author: George Dawson,Richard Glaubman
  • Publisher: Random House Trade Paperbacks
  • ISBN: 0812984870
  • Category: Biography & Autobiography
  • Page: 288
  • View: 1942
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A man who learned to read when he was ninety-eight recalls the early hardships of his life, shares his memories of segregation, and discusses his philosophical observations.

Facing Social Class

Facing Social Class

How Societal Rank Influences Interaction

  • Author: Susan T. Fiske,Hazel Rose Markus
  • Publisher: Russell Sage Foundation
  • ISBN: 1610447816
  • Category: Social Science
  • Page: 272
  • View: 8941
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Many Americans, holding fast to the American Dream and the promise of equal opportunity, claim that social class doesn't matter. Yet the ways we talk and dress, our interactions with authority figures, the degree of trust we place in strangers, our religious beliefs, our achievements, our senses of morality and of ourselves—all are marked by social class, a powerful factor affecting every domain of life. In Facing Social Class, social psychologists Susan Fiske and Hazel Rose Markus, and a team of sociologists, anthropologists, linguists, and legal scholars, examine the many ways we communicate our class position to others and how social class shapes our daily, face-to-face interactions—from casual exchanges to interactions at school, work, and home. Facing Social Class exposes the contradiction between the American ideal of equal opportunity and the harsh reality of growing inequality, and it shows how this tension is reflected in cultural ideas and values, institutional practices, everyday social interactions, and psychological tendencies. Contributor Joan Williams examines cultural differences between middle- and working-class people and shows how the cultural gap between social class groups can influence everything from voting practices and political beliefs to work habits, home life, and social behaviors. In a similar vein, Annette Lareau and Jessica McCrory Calarco analyze the cultural advantages or disadvantages exhibited by different classes in institutional settings, such as those between parents and teachers. They find that middle-class parents are better able to advocate effectively for their children in school than are working-class parents, who are less likely to challenge a teacher's authority. Michael Kraus, Michelle Rheinschmidt, and Paul Piff explore the subtle ways we signal class status in social situations. Conversational style and how close one person stands to another, for example, can influence the balance of power in a business interaction. Diana Sanchez and Julie Garcia even demonstrate that markers of low socioeconomic status such as incarceration or unemployment can influence whether individuals are categorized as white or black—a finding that underscores how race and class may work in tandem to shape advantage or disadvantage in social interactions. The United States has one of the highest levels of income inequality and one of the lowest levels of social mobility among industrialized nations, yet many Americans continue to buy into the myth that theirs is a classless society. Facing Social Class faces the reality of how social class operates in our daily lives, why it is so pervasive, and what can be done to alleviate its effects.

The Hidden Rules of Race

The Hidden Rules of Race

  • Author: Andrea Flynn,Susan R. Holmberg,Dorian T. Warren,Felicia J. Wong
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press
  • ISBN: 110841754X
  • Category: Business & Economics
  • Page: N.A
  • View: 5857
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This book explores the racial rules that are often hidden but perpetuate vast racial inequities in the United States.

A Colony in a Nation

A Colony in a Nation

  • Author: Chris Hayes
  • Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
  • ISBN: 0393254232
  • Category: Social Science
  • Page: 256
  • View: 708
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New York Times best-selling author and Emmy Award–winning news anchor Chris Hayes argues that there are really two Americas: a Colony and a Nation. America likes to tell itself that it inhabits a postracial world, yet nearly every empirical measure—wealth, unemployment, incarceration, school segregation—reveals that racial inequality has barely improved since 1968, when Richard Nixon became our first “law and order” president. With the clarity and originality that distinguished his prescient bestseller, Twilight of the Elites, Chris Hayes upends our national conversation on policing and democracy in a book of wide-ranging historical, social, and political analysis. Hayes contends our country has fractured in two: the Colony and the Nation. In the Nation, we venerate the law. In the Colony, we obsess over order, fear trumps civil rights, and aggressive policing resembles occupation. A Colony in a Nation explains how a country founded on justice now looks like something uncomfortably close to a police state. How and why did Americans build a system where conditions in Ferguson and West Baltimore mirror those that sparked the American Revolution? A Colony in a Nation examines the surge in crime that began in the 1960s and peaked in the 1990s, and the unprecedented decline that followed. Drawing on close-hand reporting at flashpoints of racial conflict, as well as deeply personal experiences with policing, Hayes explores cultural touchstones, from the influential “broken windows” theory to the “squeegee men” of late-1980s Manhattan, to show how fear causes us to make dangerous and unfortunate choices, both in our society and at the personal level. With great empathy, he seeks to understand the challenges of policing communities haunted by the omnipresent threat of guns. Most important, he shows that a more democratic and sympathetic justice system already exists—in a place we least suspect. A Colony in a Nation is an essential book—searing and insightful—that will reframe our thinking about law and order in the years to come.