Search Results for "reading-the-bible-in-the-middle-ages"

Reading the Bible in the Middle Ages

Reading the Bible in the Middle Ages

  • Author: Jinty Nelson,Damien Kempf
  • Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing
  • ISBN: 1474245730
  • Category: History
  • Page: 288
  • View: 4644
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For earlier medieval Christians, the Bible was the book of guidance above all others, and the route to religious knowledge, used for all kinds of practical purposes, from divination to models of government in kingdom or household. This book's focus is on how medieval people accessed Scripture by reading, but also by hearing and memorizing sound-bites from the liturgy, chants and hymns, or sermons explicating Scripture in various vernaculars. Time, place and social class determined access to these varied forms of Scripture. Throughout the earlier medieval period, the Psalms attracted most readers and searchers for meanings. This book's contributors probe readers' motivations, intellectual resources and religious concerns. They ask for whom the readers wrote, where they expected their readers to be located and in what institutional, social and political environments they belonged; why writers chose to write about, or draw on, certain parts of the Bible rather than others, and what real-life contexts or conjunctures inspired them; why the Old Testament so often loomed so large, and how its law-books, its histories, its prophetic books and its poetry were made intelligible to readers, hearers and memorizers. This book's contributors, in raising so many questions, do justice to both uniqueness and diversity.

Reading the Bible in the Middle Ages

Reading the Bible in the Middle Ages

  • Author: Jinty Nelson,Damien Kempf,Ian Wood
  • Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing
  • ISBN: 1350036285
  • Category: Bibles
  • Page: 296
  • View: 6180
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For earlier medieval Christians, the Bible was the book of guidance above all others, and the route to religious knowledge, used for all kinds of practical purposes, from divination to models of government in kingdom or household. This book's focus is on how medieval people accessed Scripture by reading, but also by hearing and memorizing sound-bites from the liturgy, chants and hymns, or sermons explicating Scripture in various vernaculars. Time, place and social class determined access to these varied forms of Scripture. Throughout the earlier medieval period, the Psalms attracted most readers and searchers for meanings. This book's contributors probe readers' motivations, intellectual resources and religious concerns. They ask for whom the readers wrote, where they expected their readers to be located and in what institutional, social and political environments they belonged; why writers chose to write about, or draw on, certain parts of the Bible rather than others, and what real-life contexts or conjunctures inspired them; why the Old Testament so often loomed so large, and how its law-books, its histories, its prophetic books and its poetry were made intelligible to readers, hearers and memorizers. This book's contributors, in raising so many questions, do justice to both uniqueness and diversity.

Scripture And Pluralism

Scripture And Pluralism

Reading the Bible in the Religiously Plural Worlds of the Middle Ages And Renaissance

  • Author: University of Tennessee, Knoxville. Marco Institute for Medieval and Renaissance Studies. Symposium
  • Publisher: BRILL
  • ISBN: 9004144153
  • Category: History
  • Page: 246
  • View: 5648
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This book is a study of the multiplicity of ways the Bible was used by different groups during the Middle Ages. They explore different aspects of Christian Biblical Study in the face of the challenges of religious pluralism in the medieval and early-modern periods.

The Practice of the Bible in the Middle Ages

The Practice of the Bible in the Middle Ages

Production, Reception, & Performance in Western Christianity

  • Author: Susan Boynton
  • Publisher: Columbia University Press
  • ISBN: 0231148275
  • Category: Religion
  • Page: 364
  • View: 7944
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In this volume, specialists in literature, theology, liturgy, manuscript studies, and history introduce the medieval culture of the Bible in Western Christianity. Emphasizing the living quality of the text and the unique literary traditions that arose from it, they show the many ways in which the Bible was read, performed, recorded, and interpreted by various groups in medieval Europe. An initial orientation introduces the origins, components, and organization of medieval Bibles. Subsequent chapters address the use of the Bible in teaching and preaching, the production and purpose of Biblical manuscripts in religious life, early vernacular versions of the Bible, its influence on medieval historical accounts, the relationship between the Bible and monasticism, and instances of privileged and practical use, as well as the various forms the text took in different parts of Europe. The dedicated merging of disciplines, both within each chapter and overall in the book, enable readers to encounter the Bible in much the same way as it was once experienced: on multiple levels and registers, through different lenses and screens, and always personally and intimately.

The Letter to the Galatians

The Letter to the Galatians

  • Author: Ian Levy
  • Publisher: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing
  • ISBN: 0802822231
  • Category: Religion
  • Page: 277
  • View: 2347
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Galatians is the inaugural volume in an exciting new commentary series, The Bible in Medieval Tradition, which seeks to reconnect today's Christians with a rich history of biblical interpretation. In this book Ian Christopher Levy has brought together commentaries on Paul's Epistle to the Galatians written by six medieval theologians spanning the ninth to the fourteenth centuries. Levy provides clear, readable translations of these significant texts which have never before been available in English or, in most cases, any modern language. He sets these works in historical and theological context through his in-depth introduction, locating each author within the broad sweep of medieval scholarship. These remarkable Medieval commentaries, written from a deep and pervasive faith, aimed not only to increase knowledge but, more vitally, to enhance and deepen Christian belief and piety an object of everlasting relevance to the Church.

How the Bible Became a Book

How the Bible Became a Book

The Textualization of Ancient Israel

  • Author: William M. Schniedewind
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press
  • ISBN: 9780521536226
  • Category: Religion
  • Page: 272
  • View: 7884
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How the Bible Became a Book combines recent archaeological discoveries in the Middle East with insights culled from the history of writing to address how the Bible was written and evolved into sacred Scripture. Written for general readers as well as scholars, the book provides rich insight into how these texts came to possess the authority of Scripture and explores why Ancient Israel, an oral culture, began to write literature. It describes an emerging literate society in ancient Israel that challenges the assertion that literacy first arose in Greece during the fifth century BCE. Hb ISBN (2004) 0-521-82946-1

Cultures of Religious Reading in the Late Middle Ages

Cultures of Religious Reading in the Late Middle Ages

Instructing the Soul, Feeding the Spirit, and Awakening the Passion

  • Author: Sabrina Corbellini
  • Publisher: Brepols Pub
  • ISBN: N.A
  • Category: History
  • Page: 307
  • View: 7865
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Read often, learn all that you can. Let sleep overcome you, the roll still in your hands; when your head falls, let it be on the sacred page. - St Jerome, 384 AD With these words, the Church Father Jerome exhorted the young Eustochium to find on the sacred page the spiritual nourishment that would give her the strength to live a life of chastity and to keep her monastic vows. His call to read does not stand alone. Books and reading have always played a pivotal role in early and medieval Christianity, often defined as 'a religion of the book'. A second important stage in the development of the 'religion of the book' can be attested in the late Middle Ages, when religious reading was no longer the exclusive right of men and women living in solitude and concentrating on prayer and meditation. Changes in the religious landscape and the birth of new religious movements transformed the medieval town into a privileged area of religious activity. Increasing literacy opened the door to a new and wider public of lay readers. This seminal transformation in the late medieval cultural horizon saw the growing importance of the vernacular, the cultural and religious emancipation of the laity, and the increasing participation of lay people in religious life and activities. This volume presents a new, interdisciplinary approach to religious reading and reading techniques in a lay environment within late medieval textual, social, and cultural transformations.

How to Read the Bible in Changing Times

How to Read the Bible in Changing Times

Understanding and Applying God's Word Today

  • Author: Mark L. Strauss
  • Publisher: Baker Books
  • ISBN: 1441232184
  • Category: Religion
  • Page: 282
  • View: 1799
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Many find it difficult to take words that were written thousands of years ago and apply them to twenty-first-century life in the Western world. How do we read God's unchanging Word in a world that is increasingly defined by change? How to Read the Bible in Changing Times shows everyday Christians how to interpret and apply the Scriptures regardless of time and culture. Rather than seeing the Bible as a magic answer book, a list of commands to obey, or a series of promises to claim, this insightful book allows the Bible to retain its identity as a complex, inspired document while showing that the truth it contains is relevant and life-changing. It shows the reader how to determine the meaning of the text in its original context identify culturally relative features understand what the text teaches about God, his will, and his purposes apply the truths discovered to contemporary life situations It even shows readers how to discern God's will on the many modern issues that the Bible does not directly address.

The Language and Logic of the Bible

The Language and Logic of the Bible

The Earlier Middle Ages

  • Author: G. R. Evans,Gillian Rosemary Evans
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press
  • ISBN: 9780521423939
  • Category: Religion
  • Page: 199
  • View: 3689
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Learning in the Middle Ages had the purpose of making it possible to understand the Bible better. This study looks at the assumptions within which Western Bible students from Augustine through the 12th century approached their reading and developed more refined critical methods.

The Study of the Bible in the Middle Ages

The Study of the Bible in the Middle Ages

  • Author: Beryl Smalley
  • Publisher: Acls History E-Book Project
  • ISBN: 9781597401319
  • Category: Study Aids
  • Page: 436
  • View: 2373
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An Introduction to the Medieval Bible

An Introduction to the Medieval Bible

  • Author: Frans van Liere,Franciscus Anastasius Liere
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press
  • ISBN: 0521865786
  • Category: Bibles
  • Page: 338
  • View: 2506
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An accessible account of the Bible in the Middle Ages that traces the formation of the medieval canon.

Imaging the Early Medieval Bible

Imaging the Early Medieval Bible

  • Author: John Williams
  • Publisher: Penn State Press
  • ISBN: 0271017686
  • Category: Art
  • Page: 227
  • View: 3945
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A unique exploration of the beginnings of biblical illustration and decoration.

Vernacular Bible and Religious Reform in the Middle Ages and Early Modern Era

Vernacular Bible and Religious Reform in the Middle Ages and Early Modern Era

  • Author: A. A. den Hollander,Wim François
  • Publisher: N.A
  • ISBN: 9789042934313
  • Category: Bible
  • Page: 305
  • View: 4136
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The central focus of this book concerns vernacular Bibles in various regions of (late) medieval and early modern Europe, as well as the religious and cultural circumstances in which these books found their origin. The volume includes articles that demonstrate how vernacular Bibles were liable to censorship measures, viz. Francesca Tasca's contribution on Peter Valdes of Lyons, and Gigliola Fragnito's on post-Tridentine Catholic Europe. Other essays, in contrast, inspired by a social-historical approach, emphasize that laypeople in the late Middle Ages and Early Modern Era found ways to read the Bible and other religious works 'anyway' and that they were hardly hindered by bans instituted by ecclesiastical or secular governments--

FAITH IN THE FACE OF EMPIRE

FAITH IN THE FACE OF EMPIRE

THE BIBLE THROUGH PALESTINIAN EYES

  • Author: RAHEB
  • Publisher: Orbis Books
  • ISBN: 1608334333
  • Category: Religion
  • Page: 160
  • View: 2800
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A Palestinian Christian theologian shows how the reality of empire shapes the context of the biblical story, and the ongoing experience of Middle East conflict.

Approaching the Bible in Medieval England

Approaching the Bible in Medieval England

  • Author: Eyal Poleg
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press
  • ISBN: 1526110520
  • Category: History
  • Page: N.A
  • View: 9799
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How did people learn their Bibles in the Middle Ages? Did church murals, biblical manuscripts, sermons or liturgical processions transmit the Bible in the same way? This book unveils the dynamics of biblical knowledge and dissemination in thirteenth- and fourteenth-century England. An extensive and interdisciplinary survey of biblical manuscripts and visual images, sermons and chants, reveals how the unique qualities of each medium became part of the way the Bible was known and recalled; how oral, textual, performative and visual means of transmission joined to present a surprisingly complex biblical worldview. This study of liturgy and preaching, manuscript culture and talismanic use introduces the concept of biblical mediation, a new way to explore Scriptures and society. It challenges the lay-clerical divide by demonstrating that biblical exegesis was presented to the laity in non-textual means, while the 'naked text' of the Bible remained elusive even for the educated clergy.

Reading the Middle Ages

Reading the Middle Ages

Sources from Europe, Byzantium, and the Islamic World, Third Edition

  • Author: Barbara H. Rosenwein
  • Publisher: University of Toronto Press
  • ISBN: 1442636734
  • Category: HISTORY
  • Page: 568
  • View: 6955
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Reading the Middle Ages is well-known for providing thematic and geographical diversity, clear and informative introductions, and close integration with A Short History of the Middle Ages.

Reading the Bible with the Dead

Reading the Bible with the Dead

What You Can Learn from the History of Exegesis that You Can't Learn from Exegesis Alone

  • Author: John L. Thompson
  • Publisher: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing
  • ISBN: 0802807534
  • Category: Religion
  • Page: 324
  • View: 5892
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An exploration of overlooked sections of the Bible.

Kingship and Law in the Middle Ages

Kingship and Law in the Middle Ages

Studies

  • Author: Fritz Kern
  • Publisher: The Lawbook Exchange, Ltd.
  • ISBN: 158477570X
  • Category: History
  • Page: 250
  • View: 9286
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A Classic Study of Early Constitutional Law. First published in 1914, this is one of the most important studies of early constitutional law. Kern observes that discussions of the state in the ninth, eleventh and thirteenth centuries invariably asked whose rights were paramount. Were they those of the ruler or the people? Kern locates the origins of this debate, which has continued to the twentieth century, in church doctrine and the history of the early German states. He demonstrates that the interaction of "these two sets of influences in conflict and alliance prepared the ground for a new outlook in the relations between the ruler and the ruled, and laid the foundations both of absolutist and of constitutional theory" (4). "[A] pioneering and classic study." --Norman F. Cantor, Inventing the Middle Ages, 106. Fritz Kern [1884-1950] was a professor, journalist and state official. From 1914 to 1918 he worked for the Foreign Ministry and the General Staff in Berlin. One of the leading medieval historians of his time, his works include Die Anfange der Franzosischen Ausdehnungspolitik bis zum Jahr 1308 (1910) and Recht und Verfassung im Mittelalter (1919)."

Lost in the Middle

Lost in the Middle

Midlife and the Grace of God

  • Author: Paul David Tripp
  • Publisher: Shepherd Press
  • ISBN: 9780972304689
  • Category: Family & Relationships
  • Page: 348
  • View: 8682
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Frankish World, 750-900

Frankish World, 750-900

  • Author: Jinty Nelson
  • Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing
  • ISBN: 0826422128
  • Category: History
  • Page: 290
  • View: 8152
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During the central middle ages to modem times, western Europeans were often known to their neighbours and enemies as Franks. This was due to the creation of a Frankish Empire in the eighth and ninth centuries which embraced much of Latin Christendom. Usually referred to as the Carolingian period, this volume instead invites us into a Frankish world. This shifts the accent from the dynasty of the Carolingian family to the people that made up the Frankish population and, in fact, pre-dated the Carolingians. The essays collected in this volume reflect the Frankish world from a variety of angles, but in particular the main topics include: - Carolingian politics and ritual; - Dimensions of early medieval thought; - Gender history. These essays, written over the past ten years, look beyond the aggression and intolerance often associated with the Carolingian empire and look instead towards the pluralistic alternative to domination and the plentiful potential for change and adaptation this period offered.