Search Results for "recollections-and-essays-world-s-classics"

Catalog of Reprints in Series

Catalog of Reprints in Series

  • Author: Robert Merritt Orton
  • Publisher: N.A
  • ISBN: N.A
  • Category: Editions
  • Page: N.A
  • View: 1527
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Catalog of Reprints in Series

Catalog of Reprints in Series

  • Author: N.A
  • Publisher: N.A
  • ISBN: N.A
  • Category: Editions
  • Page: N.A
  • View: 4661
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New Essays on Tolstoy

New Essays on Tolstoy

  • Author: Malcolm Jones
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press
  • ISBN: 9780521169219
  • Category: Literary Criticism
  • Page: 270
  • View: 5234
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This collection of essays focuses on Tolstoy's writing, thinking and translation problems to commemorate his 150th year of his birth.

Sansürlenen Tolstoy (Tolstoy'un Din Eleştirisi ve Türkiye'de Karanlığın Gücü)

Sansürlenen Tolstoy (Tolstoy'un Din Eleştirisi ve Türkiye'de Karanlığın Gücü)

  • Author: N.A
  • Publisher: acar burak bengi
  • ISBN: 9750131711
  • Category:
  • Page: N.A
  • View: 8057
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Books in Print

Books in Print

  • Author: N.A
  • Publisher: N.A
  • ISBN: N.A
  • Category: American literature
  • Page: N.A
  • View: 7026
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The Best of the World's Classics prose Volume 5

The Best of the World's Classics prose Volume 5

The Great Prose

  • Author: Henry Cabot Lodge
  • Publisher: 谷月社
  • ISBN: N.A
  • Category: Literary Collections
  • Page: N.A
  • View: 3830
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Volume V (of X) - Great Britain and Ireland Ever since civilized man has had a literature he has apparently sought to make selections from it and thus put his favorite passages together in a compact and convenient form. Certain it is, at least, that to the Greeks, masters in all great arts, we owe this habit. They made such collections and named them, after their pleasant imaginative fashion, a gathering of flowers, or what we, borrowing their word, call an anthology. So to those austere souls who regard anthologies as a labor-saving contrivance for the benefit of persons who like a smattering of knowledge and are never really learned, we can at least plead in mitigation that we have high and ancient authority for the practise. In any event no amount of scholarly deprecation has been able to turn mankind or that portion of mankind which reads books from the agreeable habit of making volumes of selections and finding in them much pleasure, as well as improvement in taste and knowledge. With the spread of education and with the great increase of literature among all civilized nations, more especially since the invention of printing and its vast multiplication of books, the making of volumes of selections comprizing what is best in one's own or in many literatures is no longer a mere matter of taste or convenience as with the Greeks, but has become something little short of a necessity in this world of many workers, comparatively few scholars, and still fewer intelligent men of leisure. Anthologies have been multiplied like all other books, and in the main they have done much good and no harm. The man who thinks he is a scholar or highly educated because he is familiar with what is collected in a well-chosen anthology, of course, errs grievously. Such familiarity no more makes one a master of literature than a perusal of a dictionary makes the reader a master of style. But as the latter pursuit can hardly fail to enlarge a man's vocabulary, so the former adds to his knowledge, increases his stock of ideas, liberalizes his mind and opens to him new sources of enjoyment. The Greek habit was to bring together selections of verse, passages of especial merit, epigrams and short poems. In the main their example has been followed. From their days down to the "Elegant Extracts in Verse" of our grandmothers and grandfathers, and thence on to our own time with its admirable "Golden Treasury" and "Oxford Handbook of Verse," there has been no end to the making of poetical anthologies and apparently no diminution in the public appetite for them. Poetry indeed lends itself to selection. Much of the best poetry of the world is contained in short poems, complete in themselves, and capable of transference bodily to a volume of selections. There are very few poets of whose quality and genius a fair idea can not be given by a few judicious selections. A large body of noble and beautiful poetry, of verse which is "a joy forever," can also be given in a very small compass. And the mechanical attribute of size, it must be remembered, is very important in making a successful anthology, for an essential quality of a volume of selections is that it should be easily portable, that it should be a book which can be slipt into the pocket and readily carried about in any wanderings whether near or remote. An anthology which is stored in one or more huge and heavy volumes is practically valueless except to those who have neither books nor access to a public library, or who think that a stately tome printed on calendered paper and "profusely illustrated" is an ornament to a center-table in a parlor rarely used except on solemn or official occasions. I have mentioned these advantages of verse for the purposes of an anthology in order to show the difficulties which must be encountered in making a prose selection. Very little prose is in small parcels which can be transferred entire, and therefore with the very important attribute of completeness, to a volume of selections. From most of the great prose writers it is necessary to take extracts, and the chosen passage is broken off from what comes before and after. The fame of a great prose writer as a rule rests on a book, and really to know him the book must be read and not merely passages from it. Extracts give no very satisfactory idea of "Paradise Lost" or "The Divine Comedy," and the same is true of extracts from a history or a novel. It is possible by spreading prose selections through a series of small volumes to overcome the mechanical difficulty and thus make the selections in form what they ought above all things to be—companions and not books of reference or table decorations. But the spiritual or literary problem is not so easily overcome. What prose to take and where to take it are by no means easy questions to solve. Yet they are well worth solving, so far as patient effort can do it, for in this period of easy printing it is desirable to put in convenient form before those who read examples of the masters which will draw us back from the perishing chatter of the moment to the literature which is the highest work of civilization and which is at once noble and lasting. Upon that theory this collection has been formed. It is an attempt to give examples from all periods and languages of Western civilization of what is best and most memorable in their prose literature. That the result is not a complete exhibition of the time and the literatures covered by the selections no one is better aware than the editors. Inexorable conditions of space make a certain degree of incompleteness inevitable when he who is gathering flowers traverses so vast a garden, and is obliged to confine the results of his labors within such narrow bounds. The editors are also fully conscious that, like all other similar collections, this one too will give rise to the familiar criticism and questionings as to why such a passage was omitted and such another inserted; why this writer was chosen and that other passed by. In literature we all have our favorites, and even the most catholic of us has also his dislikes if not his pet aversions. I will frankly confess that there are authors represented in these volumes whose writings I should avoid, just as there are certain towns and cities of the world to which, having once visited them, I would never willingly return, for the simple reason that I would not voluntarily subject myself to seeing or reading what I dislike or, which is worse, what bores and fatigues me. But no editor of an anthology must seek to impose upon others his own tastes and opinions. He must at the outset remember and never afterward forget that so far as possible his work must be free from the personal equation. He must recognize that some authors who may be mute or dull to him have a place in literature, past or present, sufficiently assured to entitle them to a place among selections which are intended above all things else to be representative. To those who wonder why some favorite bit of their own was omitted while something else for which they do not care at all has found a place I can only say that the editors, having supprest their own personal preferences, have proceeded on certain general principles which seem to be essential in making any selection either of verse or prose which shall possess broader and more enduring qualities than that of being a mere exhibition of the editor's personal taste. To illustrate my meaning: Emerson's "Parnassus" is extremely interesting as an exposition of the tastes and preferences of a remarkable man of great and original genius. As an anthology it is a failure, for it is of awkward size, is ill arranged and contains selections made without system, and which in many cases baffle all attempts to explain their appearance. On the other hand, Mr. Palgrave, neither a very remarkable man nor a great and original genius, gave us in the first "Golden Treasury" a collection which has no interest whatever as reflecting the tastes of the editor, but which is quite perfect in its kind. Barring the disproportionate amount of Wordsworth which includes some of his worst things—and which, be it said in passing, was due to Mr. Palgrave's giving way at that point to his personal enthusiasm—the "Golden Treasury" in form, in scope, and in arrangement, as well as in almost unerring taste, is the best model of what an anthology should be which is to be found in any language.

Writers, Readers, and Reputations

Writers, Readers, and Reputations

Literary Life in Britain 1870-1918

  • Author: Philip Waller
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press
  • ISBN: 0199541205
  • Category: History
  • Page: 1181
  • View: 7496
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Charles Dickens died in 1870, the same year in which universal elementary education was introduced. During the following generation a mass reading public emerged, and the term "best-seller" was coined. In new and cheap editions Dickens's stories sold hugely, but these were progressively outstripped in quantity by the likes of Hall Caine and Marie Corelli, Charles Garvice and Nat Gould. Who has now heard of these writers? Yet Hall Caine, for one, boasted of having made more money from his pen than any previous author. This book presents a panoramic view of literary life in Britain over half a century from 1870 to 1914, teasing out authors' relations with the reading public and tracing how reputations were made and unmade. It surveys readers' habits, the book trade, popular literary magazines and the role of reviewers, and examines the construction of a classical canon by critics concerned about the supposed corruption of popular taste. Certain writers were elevated as national heroes, yet Britain drew its writers from abroad as well as from home. Authors became stars and celebrities, and a literary tourism grew around their haunts. They advertised products from cigarettes to toothpaste; they were fashion-conscious and promoted themselves via profiles, interviews, and carefully posed photographs; they went on lecture tours to America; and their names were pushed by a new professional breed: the literary agent. Some angled for knighthoods, even peerages, and cut a figure in high society and London clubland. The debated public issues of the day and campaigned on all manner of things from questions of faith and women's rights to censorship and conscription. During the Great War they penned propaganda. Meanwhile the cinema was developing to challenge the supremacy of the written word over the imagination. Authors took to that too, as an opportunity for new adventure. Writers, Readers, and Reputations is richly entertaining and informative, amounting to a collective biography of a generation of writers and their world.

Books in Series

Books in Series

  • Author: N.A
  • Publisher: N.A
  • ISBN: N.A
  • Category: Monographic series
  • Page: N.A
  • View: 9285
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Anglia

Anglia

Zeitschrift für englische Philologie. Beiblatt. Mitteilungen über englische Sprache und Literatur und über englischen Unterricht

  • Author: N.A
  • Publisher: N.A
  • ISBN: N.A
  • Category: English philology
  • Page: N.A
  • View: 2438
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Beiblatt zur Anglia

Beiblatt zur Anglia

  • Author: N.A
  • Publisher: N.A
  • ISBN: N.A
  • Category: English philology
  • Page: N.A
  • View: 6810
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Anglia. Beiblatt

Anglia. Beiblatt

  • Author: N.A
  • Publisher: N.A
  • ISBN: N.A
  • Category: English philology
  • Page: N.A
  • View: 5895
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Abriss der englischen Literaturgeschichte in Tabellen

Abriss der englischen Literaturgeschichte in Tabellen

  • Author: Annemarie Schöne
  • Publisher: N.A
  • ISBN: N.A
  • Category: English literature
  • Page: 353
  • View: 3015
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A Literary History of England

A Literary History of England

  • Author: A Baugh
  • Publisher: Routledge
  • ISBN: 1136892990
  • Category: Literary Criticism
  • Page: 628
  • View: 8399
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First published in 1959. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Der Spiegel der See.

Der Spiegel der See.

Erinnerungen und Eindrücke.

  • Author: Joseph Conrad
  • Publisher: N.A
  • ISBN: 9783892254638
  • Category:
  • Page: 272
  • View: 1895
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Business Adventures

Business Adventures

Zwölf lehrreiche Geschichten aus der Welt der Wall Street

  • Author: John Brooks
  • Publisher: Börsenbuchverlag
  • ISBN: 3864702763
  • Category: Business & Economics
  • Page: 480
  • View: 2413
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Wenn Bill Gates in seinem Blog ein Buch zum "besten Wirtschaftsbuch" kürt und nebenbei erwähnt, dass er es sich vor Jahren von Warren Buffett geliehen hat, dann kommt das dabei heraus: Ein seit Jahren vergriffenes Werk wird wieder zum Bestseller. "Business Adventures" wurde erstmals im Jahr 1968 veröffentlicht. Es enthält zwölf Essays des New Yorker Journalisten John Brooks, in denen dieser beschreibt, wie sich das Schicksal gigantischer Unternehmen durch einen Schlüsselmoment entschied. Sie geben einen zeitlosen und tiefen Einblick in die Mechanismen der Wirtschaft und der Wall Street. Bis vor wenigen Monaten war das Buch jahrelang vergriffen. Dann lobte Bill Gates es über den grünen Klee. Der Rest ist Geschichte. "Business Adventures" schoss umgehend in die

The Bookseller

The Bookseller

  • Author: N.A
  • Publisher: N.A
  • ISBN: N.A
  • Category: English literature
  • Page: N.A
  • View: 2178
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Vols. for 1871-76, 1913-14 include an extra number, The Christmas bookseller, separately paged and not included in the consecutive numbering of the regular series.

English Literature

English Literature

Its History and Significance for the Life of the English-Speaking World

  • Author: William J. Long
  • Publisher: Simon and Schuster
  • ISBN: 1627938761
  • Category: History
  • Page: 500
  • View: 8565
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This book, which presents the whole splendid history of English literature from Anglo-Saxon times to the close of the Victorian Era, has three specific aims. The first is to create or to encourage in every student the desire to read the best books, and to know literature itself rather than what has been written about literature. The second is to interpret literature both personally and historically, that is, to show how a great book generally reflects not only the author's life and thought but also the spirit of the age and the ideals of the nation's history. The third aim is to show, by a study of each successive period, how our literature has steadily developed from its first simple songs and stories to its present complexity in prose and poetry.

The Publishers' Trade List Annual

The Publishers' Trade List Annual

  • Author: N.A
  • Publisher: N.A
  • ISBN: N.A
  • Category: American literature
  • Page: N.A
  • View: 6788
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新收洋書総合目錄

新收洋書総合目錄

  • Author: N.A
  • Publisher: N.A
  • ISBN: N.A
  • Category: Catalogs, Union
  • Page: N.A
  • View: 661
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Pride and Prejudice

Pride and Prejudice

  • Author: Jane Austen
  • Publisher: OUP Oxford
  • ISBN: 0191501069
  • Category: Fiction
  • Page: 384
  • View: 2841
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'This perfect indifference, and your pointed dislike, make it so delightfully absurd!' Pride and Prejudice has delighted generations of readers with its unforgettable cast of characters, carefully choreographed plot, and a hugely entertaining view of the world and its absurdities. With the arrival of eligible young men in their neighbourhood, the lives of Mr and Mrs Bennet and their five daughters are turned inside out and menide down. Pride encounters prejudice, upward-mobility confronts social disdain, and quick-wittedness challenges sagacity, as misconceptions and hasty judgements lead to heartache and scandal, but eventually to true understanding, self-knowledge, and love. In this supremely satisfying story, Jane Austen balances comedy with seriousness, and witty observation with profound insight. If Elizabeth Bennet returns again and again to her letter from Mr Darcy, readers of the novel are drawn even more irresistibly by its captivating wisdom. ABOUT THE SERIES: For over 100 years Oxford World's Classics has made available the widest range of literature from around the globe. Each affordable volume reflects Oxford's commitment to scholarship, providing the most accurate text plus a wealth of other valuable features, including expert introductions by leading authorities, helpful notes to clarify the text, up-to-date bibliographies for further study, and much more.