Search Results for "renegade-dreams-living-through-injury-in-gangland-chicago"

Renegade Dreams

Renegade Dreams

Living through Injury in Gangland Chicago

  • Author: Laurence Ralph
  • Publisher: University of Chicago Press
  • ISBN: 022603285X
  • Category: Social Science
  • Page: 256
  • View: 4317
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Every morning Chicagoans wake up to the same stark headlines that read like some macabre score: “13 shot, 4 dead overnight across the city,” and nearly every morning the same elision occurs: what of the nine other victims? As with war, much of our focus on inner-city violence is on the death toll, but the reality is that far more victims live to see another day and must cope with their injuries—both physical and psychological—for the rest of their lives. Renegade Dreams is their story. Walking the streets of one of Chicago’s most violent neighborhoods—where the local gang has been active for more than fifty years—Laurence Ralph talks with people whose lives are irrecoverably damaged, seeking to understand how they cope and how they can be better helped. Going deep into a West Side neighborhood most Chicagoans only know from news reports—a place where children have been shot just for crossing the wrong street—Ralph unearths the fragile humanity that fights to stay alive there, to thrive, against all odds. He talks to mothers, grandmothers, and pastors, to activists and gang leaders, to the maimed and the hopeful, to aspiring rappers, athletes, or those who simply want safe passage to school or a steady job. Gangland Chicago, he shows, is as complicated as ever. It’s not just a warzone but a community, a place where people’s dreams are projected against the backdrop of unemployment, dilapidated housing, incarceration, addiction, and disease, the many hallmarks of urban poverty that harden like so many scars in their lives. Recounting their stories, he wrestles with what it means to be an outsider in a place like this, whether or not his attempt to understand, to help, might not in fact inflict its own damage. Ultimately he shows that the many injuries these people carry—like dreams—are a crucial form of resilience, and that we should all think about the ghetto differently, not as an abandoned island of unmitigated violence and its helpless victims but as a neighborhood, full of homes, as a part of the larger society in which we all live, together, among one another.

Renegade Dreams

Renegade Dreams

Living Through Injury in Gangland Chicago

  • Author: Laurence Ralph
  • Publisher: University of Chicago Press
  • ISBN: 022603271X
  • Category: Social Science
  • Page: 250
  • View: 1407
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Inner city communities in the US have become junkyards of dreams, to quote Mike Daviswastelands where gangs package narcotics to stimulate the local economy, gunshots occur multiple times on any given day, and dreams of a better life can fade into the realities of poverty and disability. Laurence Ralph lived in such a community in Chicago for three years, conducting interviews and participating in meetings with members of the local gang which has been central to the community since the 1950s. Ralph discovered that the experience of injury, whether physical or social, doesn t always crush dreams into oblivion; it can transform them into something productive: renegade dreams. The first part of this book moves from a critique of the way government officials, as opposed to grandmothers, have been handling the situation, to a study of the history of the historic Divine Knights gang, to a portrait of a duo of gang members who want to be recognized as authentic rappers (they call their musical style crack music ) and the difficulties they face in exiting the gang. The second part is on physical disability, including being wheelchair bound, the prevalence of HIV/AIDS among heroin users, and the experience of brutality at the hands of Chicago police officers. In a final chapter, The Frame, Or How to Get Out of an Isolated Space, Ralph offers a fresh perspective on how to understand urban violence. The upshot is a total portrait of the interlocking complexities, symbols, and vicissitudes of gang life in one of the most dangerous inner city neighborhoods in the US. We expect this study will enjoy considerable readership, among anthropologists, sociologists, and other scholars interested in disability, urban crime, and race."

Renegade Dreams

Renegade Dreams

Living through Injury in Gangland Chicago

  • Author: Laurence Ralph
  • Publisher: University of Chicago Press
  • ISBN: 9780226032689
  • Category: Social Science
  • Page: 256
  • View: 2978
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Every morning Chicagoans wake up to the same stark headlines that read like some macabre score: “13 shot, 4 dead overnight across the city,” and nearly every morning the same elision occurs: what of the nine other victims? As with war, much of our focus on inner-city violence is on the death toll, but the reality is that far more victims live to see another day and must cope with their injuries—both physical and psychological—for the rest of their lives. Renegade Dreams is their story. Walking the streets of one of Chicago’s most violent neighborhoods—where the local gang has been active for more than fifty years—Laurence Ralph talks with people whose lives are irrecoverably damaged, seeking to understand how they cope and how they can be better helped. Going deep into a West Side neighborhood most Chicagoans only know from news reports—a place where children have been shot just for crossing the wrong street—Ralph unearths the fragile humanity that fights to stay alive there, to thrive, against all odds. He talks to mothers, grandmothers, and pastors, to activists and gang leaders, to the maimed and the hopeful, to aspiring rappers, athletes, or those who simply want safe passage to school or a steady job. Gangland Chicago, he shows, is as complicated as ever. It’s not just a warzone but a community, a place where people’s dreams are projected against the backdrop of unemployment, dilapidated housing, incarceration, addiction, and disease, the many hallmarks of urban poverty that harden like so many scars in their lives. Recounting their stories, he wrestles with what it means to be an outsider in a place like this, whether or not his attempt to understand, to help, might not in fact inflict its own damage. Ultimately he shows that the many injuries these people carry—like dreams—are a crucial form of resilience, and that we should all think about the ghetto differently, not as an abandoned island of unmitigated violence and its helpless victims but as a neighborhood, full of homes, as a part of the larger society in which we all live, together, among one another.

Double Cross

Double Cross

Japanese Americans in Black and White Chicago

  • Author: N.A
  • Publisher: U of Minnesota Press
  • ISBN: 9781452905969
  • Category:
  • Page: 182
  • View: 5370
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My Father's Wars

My Father's Wars

Migration, Memory, and the Violence of a Century

  • Author: Alisse Waterston
  • Publisher: Routledge
  • ISBN: 1135127077
  • Category: Social Science
  • Page: 198
  • View: 9804
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* Winner: International Congress of Qualitative Inquiry, Outstanding Book Award 2016 * My Father’s Wars is an anthropologist's vivid account of her father's journey across continents, countries, cultures, generations, and wars. It is a daughter's moving portrait of a charming, funny, wounded and difficult man. And it is a scholar's reflection on the dramatic forces of history, the experience of exile and immigration, the legacies of culture, and the enduring power of memory. This book is for Anthropology and Sociology courses in qualitative methods, ethnography, violence, migration, and ethnicity.

Everyday Ethics

Everyday Ethics

Voices from the Front Line of Community Psychiatry

  • Author: Paul Brodwin
  • Publisher: Univ of California Press
  • ISBN: 0520274784
  • Category: Social Science
  • Page: 233
  • View: 8119
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This book explores the moral lives of mental health clinicians serving the most marginalized individuals in the US healthcare system. Drawing on years of fieldwork in a community psychiatry outreach team, Brodwin traces the ethical dilemmas and everyday struggles of front line providers. On the street, in staff room debates, or in private confessions, these psychiatrists and social workers confront ongoing challenges to their self-image as competent and compassionate advocates. At times they openly question the coercion and forced-dependency built into the current system of care. At other times they justify their use of extreme power in the face of loud opposition from clients. This in-depth study exposes the fault lines in today's community psychiatry. It shows how people working deep inside the system struggle to maintain their ideals and manage a chronic sense of futility. Their commentaries about the obligatory and the forbidden also suggest ways to bridge formal bioethics and the realities of mental health practice. The experiences of these clinicians pose a single overarching question: how should we bear responsibility for the most vulnerable among us?

Viewpoints

Viewpoints

Visual Anthropologists at Work

  • Author: Mary Strong,Laena Wilder
  • Publisher: University of Texas Press
  • ISBN: 0292756135
  • Category: Social Science
  • Page: 431
  • View: 4555
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Early in its history, anthropology was a visual as well as verbal discipline. But as time passed, visually oriented professionals became a minority among their colleagues, and most anthropologists used written words rather than audiovisual modes as their professional means of communication. Today, however, contemporary electronic and interactive media once more place visual anthropologists and anthropologically oriented artists within the mainstream. Digital media, small-sized and easy-to-use equipment, and the Internet, with its interactive and public forum websites, democratize roles once relegated to highly trained professionals alone. However, having access to a good set of tools does not guarantee accurate and reliable work. Visual anthropology involves much more than media alone. This book presents visual anthropology as a work-in-progress, open to the myriad innovations that the new audiovisual communications technologies bring to the field. It is intended to aid in contextualizing, explaining, and humanizing the storehouse of visual knowledge that university students and general readers now encounter, and to help inform them about how these new media tools can be used for intellectually and socially beneficial purposes. Concentrating on documentary photography and ethnographic film, as well as lesser-known areas of study and presentation including dance, painting, architecture, archaeology, and primate research, the book's fifteen contributors feature populations living on all of the world's continents as well as within the United States. The final chapter gives readers practical advice about how to use the most current digital and interactive technologies to present research findings.

Anasazi Architecture and American Design

Anasazi Architecture and American Design

  • Author: Baker H. Morrow,Vincent Barrett Price
  • Publisher: UNM Press
  • ISBN: 9780826317797
  • Category: Architecture
  • Page: 241
  • View: 2979
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Anasazi Architecture and American Designis a journey through Chaco Canyon and Mesa Verde with leading southwestern archaeologists, historians, architects, landscape architects, artists, and urban planners as guides. In sixteen chapters, the volume's twenty-two essayists identify Anasazi building and cultural features related to design and site planning, cosmography, mythology, and ecology, then expertly balance their observations of past architectural and cultural achievements with suggestions and recommendations for design practices in the present. Among the contributors are Santa Clara Pueblo architectural theorist Rina Swentzell; architects Tony Anella and Stephen Schreiber; historian Richard Ellis; art historian J. J. Brody; archaeologists Stephen Lekson, David Stuart, Michael Marshall, John Stein, and Dabney Ford; urban planners Theodore Jojola, Judith Suiter, Stephen Dent, Barbara Coleman, and Paul Lusk; and artist Anna Sofaer, founder of the Solstice Project.

Bodies of Difference

Bodies of Difference

Experiences of Disability and Institutional Advocacy in the Making of Modern China

  • Author: Matthew Kohrman
  • Publisher: Univ of California Press
  • ISBN: 0520226445
  • Category: History
  • Page: 285
  • View: 1161
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Annotation A study of the culture of disability in China and the emergence of the government institution known as the China Disabled Persons' Federation.

Behold the Black Caiman

Behold the Black Caiman

A Chronicle of Ayoreo Life

  • Author: Lucas Bessire
  • Publisher: University of Chicago Press
  • ISBN: 022617560X
  • Category: Social Science
  • Page: 296
  • View: 3807
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In 2004, one of the world’s last bands of voluntarily isolated nomads left behind their ancestral life in the dwindling thorn forests of northern Paraguay, fleeing ranchers’ bulldozers. Behold the Black Caiman is Lucas Bessire’s intimate chronicle of the journey of this small group of Ayoreo people, the terrifying new world they now face, and the precarious lives they are piecing together against the backdrop of soul-collecting missionaries, humanitarian NGOs, late liberal economic policies, and the highest deforestation rate in the world. Drawing on ten years of fieldwork, Bessire highlights the stark disconnect between the desperate conditions of Ayoreo life for those out of the forest and the well-funded global efforts to preserve those Ayoreo still living in it. By showing how this disconnect reverberates within Ayoreo bodies and minds, his reflexive account takes aim at the devastating consequences of our society’s continued obsession with the primitive and raises important questions about anthropology’s potent capacity to further or impede indigenous struggles for sovereignty. The result is a timely update to the classic literary ethnographies of South America, a sustained critique of the so-called ontological turn—one of anthropology’s hottest trends—and, above all, an urgent call for scholars and activists alike to rethink their notions of difference.

Feeding Desire

Feeding Desire

Fatness, Beauty and Sexuality Among a Saharan People

  • Author: Rebecca Popenoe
  • Publisher: Routledge
  • ISBN: 1135140855
  • Category: Social Science
  • Page: 256
  • View: 591
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While the Western world adheres to a beauty ideal that says women can never be too thin, the semi-nomadic Moors of the Sahara desert have for centuries cherished a feminine ideal of extreme fatness. Voluptuous immobility is thought to beautify girls' bodies, hasten the onset of puberty, heighten their sexuality and ripen them for marriage. From the time of the loss of their first milk teeth, girls are directed to eat huge bowls of milk and porridge in one of the world's few examples of active female fattening. Based on fieldwork in an Arab village in Niger, Feeding Desire analyses the meanings of women's fatness as constituted by desire, kinship, concepts of health, Islam, and the crucial social need to manage sexuality. By demonstrating how a particular beauty ideal can only be understood within wider social structures and cultural logics, the book also implicitly provides a new way of thinking about the ideal of slimness in late Western capitalism. Offering a reminder that an estimated eighty per cent of the world's societies prefer plump women, this gracefully written book is both a fascinating exploration of the nature of bodily ideals and a highly readable ethnography of a Saharan people.

Life Beside Itself

Life Beside Itself

Imagining Care in the Canadian Arctic

  • Author: Lisa Stevenson
  • Publisher: Univ of California Press
  • ISBN: 0520958551
  • Category: Social Science
  • Page: 272
  • View: 5691
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In Life Beside Itself, Lisa Stevenson takes us on a haunting ethnographic journey through two historical moments when life for the Canadian Inuit has hung in the balance: the tuberculosis epidemic (1940s to the early 1960s) and the subsequent suicide epidemic (1980s to the present). Along the way, Stevenson troubles our commonsense understanding of what life is and what it means to care for the life of another. Through close attention to the images in which we think and dream and through which we understand the world, Stevenson describes a world in which life is beside itself: the name-soul of a teenager who dies in a crash lives again in his friend’s newborn baby, a young girl shares a last smoke with a dead friend in a dream, and the possessed hands of a clock spin uncontrollably over its face. In these contexts, humanitarian policies make little sense because they attempt to save lives by merely keeping a body alive. For the Inuit, and perhaps for all of us, life is "somewhere else," and the task is to articulate forms of care for others that are adequate to that truth.

In My Mother's House

In My Mother's House

Civil War in Sri Lanka

  • Author: Sharika Thiranagama
  • Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press
  • ISBN: 0812205111
  • Category: History
  • Page: 320
  • View: 2421
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In May 2009, the Sri Lankan army overwhelmed the last stronghold of the Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam—better known as the Tamil Tigers—officially bringing an end to nearly three decades of civil war. Although the war has ended, the place of minorities in Sri Lanka remains uncertain, not least because the lengthy conflict drove entire populations from their homes. The figures are jarring: for example, all of the roughly 80,000 Muslims in northern Sri Lanka were expelled from the Tamil Tiger-controlled north, and nearly half of all Sri Lankan Tamils were displaced during the course of the civil war. Sharika Thiranagama's In My Mother's House provides ethnographic insight into two important groups of internally displaced people: northern Sri Lankan Tamils and Sri Lankan Muslims. Through detailed engagement with ordinary people struggling to find a home in the world, Thiranagama explores the dynamics within and between these two minority communities, describing how these relations were reshaped by violence, displacement, and authoritarianism. In doing so, she illuminates an often overlooked intraminority relationship and new social forms created through protracted war. In My Mother's House revolves around three major themes: ideas of home in the midst of profound displacement; transformations of familial experience; and the impact of the political violence—carried out by both the Tamil Tigers and the Sri Lankan state—on ordinary lives and public speech. Her rare focus on the effects and responses to LTTE political regulation and violence demonstrates that envisioning a peaceful future for post-conflict Sri Lanka requires taking stock of the new Tamil and Muslim identities forged by the civil war. These identities cannot simply be cast away with the end of the war but must be negotiated anew.

Archaeological Laboratory Methods

Archaeological Laboratory Methods

An Introduction

  • Author: Mark Q. Sutton,Brooke S. Arkush
  • Publisher: Kendall Hunt
  • ISBN: 9780787281533
  • Category: Social Science
  • Page: 383
  • View: 8017
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A History of Anthropological Theory, Fifth Edition

A History of Anthropological Theory, Fifth Edition

  • Author: Paul A. Erickson,Liam D. Murphy
  • Publisher: University of Toronto Press
  • ISBN: 1442636866
  • Category: Social Science
  • Page: 320
  • View: 4365
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The fifth edition of this bestselling theory text has been revised throughout, with substantial updates, including more on gender and sexuality, and with a new section on Anthropologies of the Digital Age. Keyword definitions have been reinstated in the margins, and biographical information on theorists has been enhanced to build stronger context for readers. On its own or used with the companion volume, Readings for a History of Anthropological Theory, this text provides comprehensive coverage in a flexible and easy-to-use format for teaching in the undergraduate anthropology classroom.

Stories of Culture and Place

Stories of Culture and Place

An Introduction to Anthropology, Second Edition

  • Author: Michael G. Kenny,Kirsten Smillie
  • Publisher: University of Toronto Press
  • ISBN: 1487593708
  • Category: Social Science
  • Page: 320
  • View: 1091
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This unique introduction to cultural anthropology is structured as a narrative, rather than a compendium of facts about cultures and concepts. It describes anthropology as a series of stories that emerge from cultural encounters in particular times and places. These moments of encounter are illustrated with reference to both classic and contemporary ethnographic examples--from Coming of Age in Samoa to Coming of Age in Second Life--allowing readers to grasp anthropology's sometimes problematic past, while still capturing the excitement and potential of the discipline. The second edition has been updated throughout with fresh ethnographic examples. It features a new introduction and two new chapters: one on economic anthropology and exchange, and one on health and medicine. A glossary has also been added for quick reference.

The Darjeeling Distinction

The Darjeeling Distinction

Labor and Justice on Fair-Trade Tea Plantations in India

  • Author: Sarah Besky
  • Publisher: Univ of California Press
  • ISBN: 0520277392
  • Category: Cooking
  • Page: 233
  • View: 2465
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Nestled in the Himalayan foothills of Northeast India, Darjeeling is synonymous with some of the finest and most expensive tea in the world. It is also home to a violent movement for regional autonomy that, like the tea industry, dates back to the days of colonial rule. In this nuanced ethnography, Sarah Besky narrates the lives of tea workers in Darjeeling. She explores how notions of fairness, value, and justice shifted with the rise of fair-trade practices and postcolonial separatist politics in the region. This is the first book to explore how fair-trade operates in the context of large-scale plantations. Readers in a variety of disciplines—anthropology, sociology, geography, environmental studies, and food studies—will gain a critical perspective on how plantation life is changing as Darjeeling struggles to reinvent its signature commodity for twenty-first-century consumers. The Darjeeling Distinction challenges fair-trade policy and practice, exposing how trade initiatives often fail to consider the larger environmental, historical, and sociopolitical forces that shape the lives of the people they intended to support.

Queen for a Day

Queen for a Day

Transformistas, Beauty Queens, and the Performance of Femininity in Venezuela

  • Author: Marcia Ochoa
  • Publisher: Duke University Press
  • ISBN: 0822376997
  • Category: Social Science
  • Page: 296
  • View: 4232
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Queen for a Day connects the logic of Venezuelan modernity with the production of a national femininity. In this ethnography, Marcia Ochoa considers how femininities are produced, performed, and consumed in the mass-media spectacles of international beauty pageants, on the runways of the Miss Venezuela contest, on the well-traveled Caracas avenue where transgender women (transformistas) project themselves into the urban imaginary, and on the bodies of both transformistas and beauty pageant contestants (misses). Placing transformistas and misses in the same analytic frame enables Ochoa to delve deeply into complex questions of media and spectacle, gender and sexuality, race and class, and self-fashioning and identity in Venezuela. Beauty pageants play an outsized role in Venezuela. The country has won more international beauty contests than any other. The femininity performed by Venezuelan women in high-profile, widely viewed pageants defines a kind of national femininity. Ochoa argues that as transformistas and misses work to achieve the bodies, clothing and makeup styles, and postures and gestures of this national femininity, they come to embody Venezuelan modernity.

Core Concepts in Cultural Anthropology

Core Concepts in Cultural Anthropology

  • Author: Robert H. Lavenda,Emily Ann Schultz
  • Publisher: N.A
  • ISBN: 9780190459727
  • Category: Ethnology
  • Page: N.A
  • View: 6995
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Shapeshifters

Shapeshifters

Black Girls and the Choreography of Citizenship

  • Author: Aimee Meredith Cox
  • Publisher: Duke University Press
  • ISBN: 0822375370
  • Category: Social Science
  • Page: 296
  • View: 855
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In Shapeshifters Aimee Meredith Cox explores how young Black women in a Detroit homeless shelter contest stereotypes, critique their status as partial citizens, and negotiate poverty, racism, and gender violence to create and imagine lives for themselves. Based on eight years of fieldwork at the Fresh Start shelter, Cox shows how the shelter's residents—who range in age from fifteen to twenty-two—employ strategic methods she characterizes as choreography to disrupt the social hierarchies and prescriptive narratives that work to marginalize them. Among these are dance and poetry, which residents learn in shelter workshops. These outlets for performance and self-expression, Cox shows, are key to the residents exercising their agency, while their creation of alternative family structures demands a rethinking of notions of care, protection, and love. Cox also uses these young women's experiences to tell larger stories: of Detroit's history, the Great Migration, deindustrialization, the politics of respectability, and the construction of Black girls and women as social problems. With Shapeshifters Cox gives a voice to young Black women who find creative and non-normative solutions to the problems that come with being young, Black, and female in America.