Search Results for "roots-of-american-racism"

Roots of American Racism

Roots of American Racism

Essays on the Colonial Experience

  • Author: Alden T. Vaughan
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand
  • ISBN: 0195086872
  • Category: History
  • Page: 350
  • View: 5282
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This important new collection brings together ten of Alden Vaughan's essays about race relations in the British colonies. Focusing on the variable role of cultural and racial perceptions on colonial policies for Indians and African Americans, the essays include explorations of the origins of slavery and racism in Virginia, the causes of the Puritans' war against the Pequots, and the contest between natives and colonists to win the other's allegiance by persuasion or captivity. Less controversial but equally important to understanding the racial dynamics of early America are essays on early English paradigmatic views of Native Americans, the changing Anglo-American perceptions of Indian color and character, and frontier violence in pre-Revolutionary Pennsylvania. Published here for the first time are an extensive exposé of slaveholder ideology in seventeenth-century Barbados, the second half of an essay on Puritan judicial policies for Indians, a general introduction, and headnotes to each essay. All previously published pieces have been revised to reflect recent scholarship or to address recent debates. Challenging standard interpretations while probing previously-ignored aspects of early American race relations, this convenient and provocative collection by one our most incisive commentators will be required reading for all scholars and students of early American history.

Roots of American Racism

Roots of American Racism

Essays on the Colonial Experience

  • Author: Alden T. Vaughan
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
  • ISBN: 9780195086867
  • Category: Social Science
  • Page: 350
  • View: 9136
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This collection of essays focuses principally on ethnic relations in colonial America. While the principal concern of the book is the interaction of culture and races, its more specific focus is on the evolution of colonial policies that arose from European perceptions of native Americans.

Stamped from the Beginning

Stamped from the Beginning

The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America

  • Author: Ibram X. Kendi
  • Publisher: Nation Books
  • ISBN: 1568584644
  • Category: History
  • Page: 592
  • View: 8623
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A searing history of how racist ideas were created, disseminated, and entrenched in America Winner of the 2016 National Book Award for Nonfiction A New York Times Bestseller A Washington Post Bestseller Finalist for the 2016 National Book Critics Circle Award for Nonfiction Named one of the Best Books of the Year by the Boston Globe, Washington Post, Chicago Review of Books, The Root, Buzzfeed, Bustle, and Entropy "The most ambitious book of 2016."-The Washington Post Some Americans cling desperately to the myth that we are living in a post-racial society, that the election of the first black president spelled the doom of racism. But racist thought is not just alive and well in America--it is more sophisticated and more insidious than ever. And as award-winning historian Ibram X. Kendi argues in Stamped from the Beginning, if we have any hope of grappling with this stark reality, we must first understand how racist ideas were developed, disseminated, and enshrined in American society. In this deeply researched and fast-moving narrative, Kendi chronicles the entire story of anti-black racist ideas and their staggering power over the course of American history. Stamped from the Beginning uses the life stories of five major American intellectuals to offer a window into the contentious debates between assimilationists and segregationists and between racists and antiracists. From Puritan minister Cotton Mather to Thomas Jefferson, from fiery abolitionist William Lloyd Garrison to brilliant scholar W.E.B. Du Bois to legendary anti-prison activist Angela Davis, Kendi shows how and why some of our leading pro-slavery and pro-civil rights thinkers have challenged or helped cement racist ideas in America. Contrary to popular conceptions, racist ideas did not arise from ignorance or hatred. Instead, they were devised and honed by some of the most brilliant minds of each era. These intellectuals used their brilliance to justify and rationalize deeply entrenched discriminatory policies and the nation's racial disparities in everything from wealth to health. And while racist ideas are easily produced and easily consumed, they can also be discredited. In shedding much-needed light on the murky history of racist ideas, Stamped from the Beginning offers us the tools we need to expose them--and in the process, gives us reason to hope.

Roots of African American Violence

Roots of African American Violence

Ethnocentrism, Cultural Diversity, and Racism

  • Author: Darnell Felix Hawkins,Jerome B. McKean
  • Publisher: N.A
  • ISBN: 9781626376052
  • Category: African American criminals
  • Page: 267
  • View: 7189
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What explains the well-documented racial disparities in rates of homicide and other acts of criminal violence in the United States? Critically confronting the conventional narratives that purport to answer this question, the authors of Roots of African American Violence offer an alternative framework¿one that acknowledges the often hidden cultural diversity and within-race ethnocentrism that exists in black communities. Their provocative work, drawing insights from criminology, criminal justice, anthropology, and sociology, is a seminal step in efforts to understand the intersection of race and violence.

"We Hold These Truths to be Self-evident-- "

An Interdisciplinary Analysis of the Roots of Racism and Slavery in America

  • Author: Kenneth N. Addison
  • Publisher: University Press of America
  • ISBN: 0761843299
  • Category: History
  • Page: 492
  • View: 6429
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It is one of America's most beloved national parks, and now you can make visiting it even better. Give your kids the Yosemite Activity Book for hours of fun! From mazes and word finds to maps and pictures to color, it's a great way to learn about the area and is ideal for car rides and quiet time.

Racist America

Racist America

Roots, Current Realities, and Future Reparations

  • Author: Joe R. Feagin
  • Publisher: Routledge
  • ISBN: 1135959641
  • Category: Social Science
  • Page: 304
  • View: 477
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Racist America is a bold, thoughtful exploration of the ubiquity of race in contemporary life. It develops an antiracist theory rooted not only in the latest empirical data but also in the current reality of racism in the U.S.

Blood at the Root: A Racial Cleansing in America

Blood at the Root: A Racial Cleansing in America

  • Author: Patrick Phillips
  • Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
  • ISBN: 0393293025
  • Category: History
  • Page: 304
  • View: 9705
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“Gripping and meticulously documented.”—Don Schanche Jr., Washington Post Forsyth County, Georgia, at the turn of the twentieth century, was home to a large African American community that included ministers and teachers, farmers and field hands, tradesmen, servants, and children. But then in September of 1912, three young black laborers were accused of raping and murdering a white girl. One man was dragged from a jail cell and lynched on the town square, two teenagers were hung after a one-day trial, and soon bands of white “night riders” launched a coordinated campaign of arson and terror, driving all 1,098 black citizens out of the county. The charred ruins of homes and churches disappeared into the weeds, until the people and places of black Forsyth were forgotten. National Book Award finalist Patrick Phillips tells Forsyth’s tragic story in vivid detail and traces its long history of racial violence all the way back to antebellum Georgia. Recalling his own childhood in the 1970s and ’80s, Phillips sheds light on the communal crimes of his hometown and the violent means by which locals kept Forsyth “all white” well into the 1990s. In precise, vivid prose, Blood at the Root delivers a “vital investigation of Forsyth’s history, and of the process by which racial injustice is perpetuated in America” (Congressman John Lewis).

Economics of Racism Two

Economics of Racism Two

  • Author: Victor Perlo
  • Publisher: International Pub
  • ISBN: 9780717806980
  • Category: Business & Economics
  • Page: 307
  • View: 2206
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A completely new edition. Reexamines the facts and explores their new dimensions, the issues and remedies for the 1990s and the next millennium.

The Making of a Racist

The Making of a Racist

A Southerner Reflects on Family, History, and the Slave Trade

  • Author: Charles B. Dew
  • Publisher: University of Virginia Press
  • ISBN: 0813938880
  • Category: History
  • Page: 200
  • View: 851
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In this powerful memoir, Charles Dew, one of America’s most respected historians of the South--and particularly its history of slavery--turns the focus on his own life, which began not in the halls of enlightenment but in a society unequivocally committed to segregation. Dew re-creates the midcentury American South of his childhood--in many respects a boy’s paradise, but one stained by Lost Cause revisionism and, worse, by the full brunt of Jim Crow. Through entertainments and "educational" books that belittled African Americans, as well as the living examples of his own family, Dew was indoctrinated in a white supremacy that, at best, was condescendingly paternalistic and, at worst, brutally intolerant. The fear that southern culture, and the "hallowed white male brotherhood," could come undone through the slightest flexibility in the color line gave the Jim Crow mindset its distinctly unyielding quality. Dew recalls his father, in most regards a decent man, becoming livid over a black tradesman daring to use the front, and not the back, door. The second half of the book shows how this former Confederate youth and descendant of Thomas Roderick Dew, one of slavery’s most passionate apologists, went on to reject his racist upbringing and become a scholar of the South and its deeply conflicted history. The centerpiece of Dew’s story is his sobering discovery of a price circular from 1860--an itemized list of humans up for sale. Contemplating this document becomes Dew’s first step in an exploration of antebellum Richmond’s slave trade that investigates the terrible--but, to its white participants, unremarkable--inhumanity inherent in the institution. Dew’s wish with this book is to show how the South of his childhood came into being, poisoning the minds even of honorable people, and to answer the question put to him by Illinois Browning Culver, the African American woman who devoted decades of her life to serving his family: "Charles, why do the grown-ups put so much hate in the children?"

Technology and the Logic of American Racism

Technology and the Logic of American Racism

A Cultural History of the Body as Evidence

  • Author: Sarah E. Chinn
  • Publisher: A&C Black
  • ISBN: 1847143571
  • Category: Literary Criticism
  • Page: 256
  • View: 1330
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In this book, Sarah E. Chinn pulls together what seems to be opposite discourses--the information-driven languages of law and medicine and the subjective logics of racism--to examine how racial identity has been constructed in the United States over the past century. She examines a range of primary social case studies such as the American Red Cross' lamentable decision to segregate the blood of black and white donors during World War II, and its ramifications for American culture, and more recent examples that reveal the racist nature of criminology, such as the recent trial of O.J. Simpson. Among several key American literary texts, she looks at Mark Twain's Pudd'nhead Wilson, a novel whose plot turns on issues of racial identity and which was written at a time when scientific and popular interest in evidence of the body, such as fingerprinting, was at a peak.

Clean and White

Clean and White

A History of Environmental Racism in the United States

  • Author: Carl A. Zimring
  • Publisher: NYU Press
  • ISBN: 147987437X
  • Category: History
  • Page: 288
  • View: 6567
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When Joe Biden attempted to compliment Barack Obama by calling him “clean and articulate,” he unwittingly tapped into one of the most destructive racial stereotypes in American history. This book tells the history of the corrosive idea that whites are clean and those who are not white are dirty. From the age of Thomas Jefferson to the Memphis Public Workers strike of 1968 through the present day, ideas about race and waste have shaped where people have lived, where people have worked, and how American society’s wastes have been managed. Clean and White offers a history of environmental racism in the United States focusing on constructions of race and hygiene. In the wake of the civil war, as the nation encountered emancipation, mass immigration, and the growth of an urbanized society, Americans began to conflate the ideas of race and waste. Certain immigrant groups took on waste management labor, such as Jews and scrap metal recycling, fostering connections between the socially marginalized and refuse. Ethnic “purity” was tied to pure cleanliness, and hygiene became a central aspect of white identity. Carl A. Zimring here draws on historical evidence from statesmen, scholars, sanitarians, novelists, activists, advertisements, and the United States Census of Population to reveal changing constructions of environmental racism. The material consequences of these attitudes endured and expanded through the twentieth century, shaping waste management systems and environmental inequalities that endure into the twenty-first century. Today, the bigoted idea that non-whites are “dirty” remains deeply ingrained in the national psyche, continuing to shape social and environmental inequalities in the age of Obama.

Lost Tribes and Promised Lands

Lost Tribes and Promised Lands

The Origins of American Racism

  • Author: Ronald Sanders
  • Publisher: Little Brown
  • ISBN: 9780316770088
  • Category: America
  • Page: 443
  • View: 5571
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Analyse van de oorsprong van het Amerikaanse racisme vanaf de 14e eeuw in Spanje tot de 18e eeuw in Noord-Amerika

Seeds of Racism in the Soul of America

Seeds of Racism in the Soul of America

  • Author: Paul R. Griffin
  • Publisher: N.A
  • ISBN: N.A
  • Category: Social Science
  • Page: 148
  • View: 1354
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White liberals once marched arm-in-arm with black activists during the civil rights era. Since the 1970s, however, such support has dwindled. What accounts for this? According to Paul Griffin, Northern white liberals harbor the seeds of racism. Pious New England Puritans explained the different stations of the races as God's arrangement. Griffin's book dares to expose the racism that was planted in this nation from its founding -- and that continues to bear bitter fruit to this day.

Destroying the Root of Racism

Destroying the Root of Racism

  • Author: Ron Webb
  • Publisher: Ron Webb
  • ISBN: 9781633081840
  • Category:
  • Page: 100
  • View: 1286
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Racism is not a skin problem, it is a SIN problem. Bishop Webb preaches that violence begets violence, but unity with the brethren will always invite the Holy Spirit in. Recognizing that you can be angry and sin not, Dr. Webb believes that righteous anger turns ordinary people into heroes who shape the course of history. He invites us to be part of the solution, and urges those hurt by racism not to let the adversity destroy their character, but instead let it define their character. Consistency is powerful, and Dr. Webb opens our eyes to the consistent opportunities to stand firm in our conviction that if God is no respecter of persons, we should follow His example and embrace our differences with Christ-like love.

The Half Has Never Been Told

The Half Has Never Been Told

Slavery and the Making of American Capitalism

  • Author: Edward E. Baptist
  • Publisher: Basic Books
  • ISBN: 0465097685
  • Category: History
  • Page: 560
  • View: 3818
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Americans tend to cast slavery as a pre-modern institution—the nation's original sin, perhaps, but isolated in time and divorced from America's later success. But to do so robs the millions who suffered in bondage of their full legacy. As historian Edward Baptist reveals in The Half Has Never Been Told, the expansion of slavery in the first eight decades after American independence drove the evolution and modernization of the United States. In the span of a single lifetime, the South grew from a narrow coastal strip of worn-out tobacco plantations to a continental cotton empire, and the United States grew into a modern, industrial, and capitalist economy. Until the Civil War, Baptist explains, the most important American economic innovations were ways to make slavery ever more profitable. Through forced migration and torture, slave owners extracted continual increases in efficiency from enslaved African Americans. Thus the United States seized control of the world market for cotton, the key raw material of the Industrial Revolution, and became a wealthy nation with global influence. Told through intimate slave narratives, plantation records, newspapers, and the words of politicians, entrepreneurs, and escaped slaves, The Half Has Never Been Told offers a radical new interpretation of American history. It forces readers to reckon with the violence at the root of American supremacy, but also with the survival and resistance that brought about slavery's end—and created a culture that sustains America's deepest dreams of freedom.

Race and Manifest Destiny

Race and Manifest Destiny

  • Author: Reginald HORSMAN
  • Publisher: Harvard University Press
  • ISBN: 9780674948051
  • Category: History
  • Page: 367
  • View: 9421
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American myths about national character tend to overshadow the historical realities. Mr. Horsman's book is the first study to examine the origins of racialism in America and to show that the belief in white American superiority was firmly ensconced in the nation's ideology by 1850. The author deftly chronicles the beginnings and growth of an ideology stressing race, basic stock, and attributes in the blood. He traces how this ideology shifted from the more benign views of the Founding Fathers, which embraced ideas of progress and the spread of republican institutions for all. He finds linkages between the new, racialist ideology in America and the rising European ideas of Anglo-Saxon, Teutonic, and scientific ideologies of the early nineteenth century. Most importantly, however, Horsman demonstrates that it was the merging of the Anglo-Saxon rhetoric with the experience of Americans conquering a continent that created a racialist philosophy. Two generations before the "new" immigrants began arriving in the late nineteenth century, Americans, in contact with blacks, Indians, and Mexicans, became vociferous racialists. In sum, even before the Civil War, Americans had decided that peoples of large parts of this continent were incapable of creating or sharing in efficient, prosperous, democratic governments, and that American Anglo-Saxons could achieve unprecedented prosperity and power by the outward thrust of their racialism and commercial penetration of other lands. The comparatively benevolent view of the Founders of the Republic had turned into the quite malevolent ideology that other peoples could not be "regenerated" through the spread of free institutions.

Slavery by Another Name

Slavery by Another Name

The re-enslavement of black americans from the civil war to World War Two

  • Author: Douglas A. Blackmon
  • Publisher: Icon Books
  • ISBN: 1848314132
  • Category: Social Science
  • Page: 496
  • View: 7112
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A Pulitzer Prize-winning history of the mistreatment of black Americans. In this 'precise and eloquent work' - as described in its Pulitzer Prize citation - Douglas A. Blackmon brings to light one of the most shameful chapters in American history - an 'Age of Neoslavery' that thrived in the aftermath of the Civil War through the dawn of World War II. Using a vast record of original documents and personal narratives, Blackmon unearths the lost stories of slaves and their descendants who journeyed into freedom after the Emancipation Proclamation and then back into the shadow of involuntary servitude thereafter. By turns moving, sobering and shocking, this unprecedented account reveals these stories, the companies that profited the most from neoslavery, and the insidious legacy of racism that reverberates today.

White Fragility

White Fragility

Why It's So Hard for White People to Talk about Racism

  • Author: Robin DiAngelo
  • Publisher: Beacon Press
  • ISBN: 0807047414
  • Category: FAMILY & RELATIONSHIPS
  • Page: 192
  • View: 3416
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Explores counterproductive reactions white people have when discussing racism that serve to protect their positions and maintain racial inequality.

Cotton and Race in the Making of America

Cotton and Race in the Making of America

The Human Costs of Economic Power

  • Author: Gene Dattel
  • Publisher: Government Institutes
  • ISBN: 1442210192
  • Category: History
  • Page: 432
  • View: 6523
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Since the earliest days of colonial America, the relationship between cotton and the African-American experience has been central to the history of the republic. America's most serious social tragedy, slavery and its legacy, spread only where cotton could be grown. Both before and after the Civil War, blacks were assigned to the cotton fields while a pervasive racial animosity and fear of a black migratory invasion caused white Northerners to contain blacks in the South. Gene Dattel's pioneering study explores the historical roots of these most central social issues. In telling detail Mr. Dattel shows why the vastly underappreciated story of cotton is a key to understanding America's rise to economic power. When cotton production exploded to satiate the nineteenth-century textile industry's enormous appetite, it became the first truly complex global business and thereby a major driving force in U.S. territorial expansion and sectional economic integration. It propelled New York City to commercial preeminence and fostered independent trade between Europe and the United States, providing export capital for the new nation to gain its financial "sea legs" in the world economy. Without slave-produced cotton, the South could never have initiated the Civil War, America's bloodiest conflict at home. Mr. Dattel's skillful historical analysis identifies the commercial forces that cotton unleashed and the pervasive nature of racial antipathy it produced. This is a story that has never been told in quite the same way before, related here with the authority of a historian with a profound knowledge of the history of international finance. With 23 black-and-white illustrations.