Search Results for "salem-possessed-social-origins-of-witchcraft-harvard-paperbacks"

Salem Possessed

Salem Possessed

The Social Origins of Witchcraft

  • Author: Paul Boyer
  • Publisher: Harvard University Press
  • ISBN: 0674282663
  • Category: History
  • Page: 256
  • View: 8715
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Tormented girls writhing in agony, stern judges meting out harsh verdicts, nineteen bodies swinging on Gallows Hill. The stark immediacy of what happened in 1692 has obscured the complex web of human passion which climaxed in the Salem witch trials From rich and varied sources—many neglected and unknown—Paul Boyer and Stephen Nissenbaum give us a picture of the people and events more intricate and more fascinating than any other in the massive literature. It is a story of powerful and deeply divided families and of a community determined to establish an independent identity—beset by restraints and opposition from without and factional conflicts from within—and a minister whose obsessions helped to bring this volatile mix to the flash point. Not simply a dramatic and isolated event, the Salem outbreak has wider implications for our understanding of developments central to the American experience: the disintegration of Puritanism, the pressures of land and population in New England towns, the problems besetting farmer and householder, the shifting role of the church, and the powerful impact of commercial capitalism.

In the Devil's Snare

In the Devil's Snare

The Salem Witchcraft Crisis of 1692

  • Author: Mary Beth Norton
  • Publisher: Vintage
  • ISBN: 9780307426369
  • Category: History
  • Page: 448
  • View: 4161
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Award-winning historian Mary Beth Norton reexamines the Salem witch trials in this startlingly original, meticulously researched, and utterly riveting study. In 1692 the people of Massachusetts were living in fear, and not solely of satanic afflictions. Horrifyingly violent Indian attacks had all but emptied the northern frontier of settlers, and many traumatized refugees—including the main accusers of witches—had fled to communities like Salem. Meanwhile the colony’s leaders, defensive about their own failure to protect the frontier, pondered how God’s people could be suffering at the hands of savages. Struck by the similarities between what the refugees had witnessed and what the witchcraft “victims” described, many were quick to see a vast conspiracy of the Devil (in league with the French and the Indians) threatening New England on all sides. By providing this essential context to the famous events, and by casting her net well beyond the borders of Salem itself, Norton sheds new light on one of the most perplexing and fascinating periods in our history. From the Trade Paperback edition.

The Devil in the Shape of a Woman: Witchcraft in Colonial New England

The Devil in the Shape of a Woman: Witchcraft in Colonial New England

  • Author: Carol F. Karlsen
  • Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
  • ISBN: 0393347192
  • Category: History
  • Page: 384
  • View: 8861
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"A pioneer work in…the sexual structuring of society. This is not just another book about witchcraft." —Edmund S. Morgan, Yale University Confessing to "familiarity with the devils," Mary Johnson, a servant, was executed by Connecticut officials in 1648. A wealthy Boston widow, Ann Hibbens was hanged in 1656 for casting spells on her neighbors. The case of Ann Cole, who was "taken with very strange Fits," fueled an outbreak of witchcraft accusations in Hartford a generation before the notorious events at Salem. More than three hundred years later, the question "Why?" still haunts us. Why were these and other women likely witches—vulnerable to accusations of witchcraft and possession? Carol F. Karlsen reveals the social construction of witchcraft in seventeenth-century New England and illuminates the larger contours of gender relations in that society.

Satan and Salem

Satan and Salem

The Witch-Hunt Crisis of 1692

  • Author: Benjamin C. Ray
  • Publisher: University of Virginia Press
  • ISBN: 0813937086
  • Category: History
  • Page: 264
  • View: 3865
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The result of a perfect storm of factors that culminated in a great moral catastrophe, the Salem witch trials of 1692 took a breathtaking toll on the young English colony of Massachusetts. Over 150 people were imprisoned, and nineteen men and women, including a minister, were executed by hanging. The colonial government, which was responsible for initiating the trials, eventually repudiated the entire affair as a great "delusion of the Devil." In Satan and Salem, Benjamin Ray looks beyond single-factor interpretations to offer a far more nuanced view of why the Salem witch-hunt spiraled out of control. Rather than assigning blame to a single perpetrator, Ray assembles portraits of several major characters, each of whom had complex motives for accusing his or her neighbors. In this way, he reveals how religious, social, political, and legal factors all played a role in the drama. Ray’s historical database of court records, documents, and maps yields a unique analysis of the geographic spread of accusations and trials, ultimately showing how the witch-hunt resulted in the execution of so many people—far more than any comparable episode on this side of the Atlantic. In addition to the print volume, Satan and Salem will also be available as a linked e-book offering the reader the opportunity to investigate firsthand the primary sources and maps on which Ray’s groundbreaking argument rests.

The Witches

The Witches

Salem, 1692

  • Author: Stacy Schiff
  • Publisher: Little, Brown
  • ISBN: 0316200611
  • Category: History
  • Page: 512
  • View: 6851
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The Pulitzer Prize-winning author of Cleopatra, the #1 national bestseller, unpacks the mystery of the Salem Witch Trials. It began in 1692, over an exceptionally raw Massachusetts winter, when a minister's daughter began to scream and convulse. It ended less than a year later, but not before 19 men and women had been hanged and an elderly man crushed to death. The panic spread quickly, involving the most educated men and prominent politicians in the colony. Neighbors accused neighbors, parents and children each other. Aside from suffrage, the Salem Witch Trials represent the only moment when women played the central role in American history. In curious ways, the trials would shape the future republic. As psychologically thrilling as it is historically seminal, THE WITCHES is Stacy Schiff's account of this fantastical story-the first great American mystery unveiled fully for the first time by one of our most acclaimed historians.

A Storm of Witchcraft

A Storm of Witchcraft

The Salem Trials and the American Experience

  • Author: Emerson W. Baker
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press
  • ISBN: 0199385149
  • Category: Body, Mind & Spirit
  • Page: 304
  • View: 2468
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Beginning in January 1692, Salem Village in colonial Massachusetts witnessed the largest and most lethal outbreak of witchcraft in early America. Villagers--mainly young women--suffered from unseen torments that caused them to writhe, shriek, and contort their bodies, complaining of pins stuck into their flesh and of being haunted by specters. Believing that they suffered from assaults by an invisible spirit, the community began a hunt to track down those responsible for the demonic work. The resulting Salem Witch Trials, culminating in the execution of 19 villagers, persists as one of the most mysterious and fascinating events in American history. Historians have speculated on a web of possible causes for the witchcraft that stated in Salem and spread across the region-religious crisis, ergot poisoning, an encephalitis outbreak, frontier war hysteria--but most agree that there was no single factor. Rather, as Emerson Baker illustrates in this seminal new work, Salem was "a perfect storm": a unique convergence of conditions and events that produced something extraordinary throughout New England in 1692 and the following years, and which has haunted us ever since. Baker shows how a range of factors in the Bay colony in the 1690s, including a new charter and government, a lethal frontier war, and religious and political conflicts, set the stage for the dramatic events in Salem. Engaging a range of perspectives, he looks at the key players in the outbreak--the accused witches and the people they allegedly bewitched, as well as the judges and government officials who prosecuted them--and wrestles with questions about why the Salem tragedy unfolded as it did, and why it has become an enduring legacy. Salem in 1692 was a critical moment for the fading Puritan government of Massachusetts Bay, whose attempts to suppress the story of the trials and erase them from memory only fueled the popular imagination. Baker argues that the trials marked a turning point in colonial history from Puritan communalism to Yankee independence, from faith in collective conscience to skepticism toward moral governance. A brilliantly told tale, A Storm of Witchcraft also puts Salem's storm into its broader context as a part of the ongoing narrative of American history and the history of the Atlantic World.

The Salem Witch Trials Reader

The Salem Witch Trials Reader

  • Author: Frances Hill
  • Publisher: Da Capo Press
  • ISBN: 0786748389
  • Category: History
  • Page: 440
  • View: 6620
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Against the backdrop of a Puritan theocracy threatened by change, in a population terrified not only of eternal damnation but of the earthly dangers of Indian massacres and recurrent smallpox epidemics, a small group of girls denounces a black slave and others as worshipers of Satan. Within two years, twenty men and women are hanged or pressed to death and over a hundred others imprisoned and impoverished. In The Salem Witch Trials Reader, Frances Hill provides and astutely comments upon the actual documents from the trial--examinations of suspected witches, eyewitness accounts of "Satanic influence," as well as the testimony of those who retained their reason and defied the madness. Always drawing on firsthand documents, she illustrates the historical background to the witchhunt and shows how the trials have been represented, and sometimes distorted, by historians--and how they have fired the imaginations of poets, playwrights, and novelists. For those fascinated by the Salem witch trials, this is compelling reading and the sourcebook.

Persuasions of the Witch's Craft

Persuasions of the Witch's Craft

Ritual Magic in Contemporary England

  • Author: Tanya M. Luhrmann
  • Publisher: Harvard University Press
  • ISBN: 9780674663244
  • Category: Body, Mind & Spirit
  • Page: 382
  • View: 4217
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Profiles the surprising number of otherwise "normal" people who practice magic and witchcraft in England today, detailing how they became involved in witchcraft, the history and tradition of magic, and other fascinating details

Witchfinders

Witchfinders

A Seventeenth-Century English Tragedy

  • Author: Malcolm Gaskill
  • Publisher: Harvard University Press
  • ISBN: 9780674025424
  • Category: History
  • Page: 364
  • View: 1227
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In 1645, two obscure gentlemen, Matthew Hopkins and John Stearne, exploited the anxiety and lawlessness of the time and initiated a brutal campaign to drive out the presumed evil in their midst. Malcolm Gaskill retells the chilling story of the most savage witch-hunt in English history. By the autumn of 1647 at least 250 people--mostly women--had been captured, interrogated, and hauled before the courts, with more than a hundred hanged.

Salem-Village Witchcraft

Salem-Village Witchcraft

A Documentary Record of Local Conflict in Colonial New England

  • Author: Paul Boyer,Stephen Nissenbaum
  • Publisher: Northeastern University Press
  • ISBN: 1555538703
  • Category: History
  • Page: 416
  • View: 8682
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Few episodes in American history have aroused such intense and continued interest as the 1692 Salem witchcraft trials. This volume draws exclusively on primary documents to reveal the underlying conflicts and tensions that caused that small, agricultural settlement to explode with such dramatic force.

The Salem Witch Trials

The Salem Witch Trials

A Day-by-day Chronicle of a Community Under Siege

  • Author: Marilynne K. Roach
  • Publisher: Taylor Trade Publications
  • ISBN: 9781589791329
  • Category: History
  • Page: 688
  • View: 5473
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The Salem Witch Trials is based on over twenty-five years of archival research--including the author's discovery of previously unknown documents--newly found cases and court records. From January 1692 to January 1697 this history unfolds a nearly day-by-day narrative of the crisis as the citizens of New England experienced it.

Class and Community

Class and Community

The Industrial Revolution in Lynn, Twenty-fifth Anniversary Edition, with a New Preface

  • Author: Alan DAWLEY,Alan Dawley
  • Publisher: Harvard University Press
  • ISBN: 0674030281
  • Category: History
  • Page: 332
  • View: 4852
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Where to Park Your Broomstick

Where to Park Your Broomstick

A Teen's Guide to Witchcraft

  • Author: Lauren Manoy
  • Publisher: Simon and Schuster
  • ISBN: 9781451603224
  • Category: Body, Mind & Spirit
  • Page: 320
  • View: 8295
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Modern Witchcraft, often called Wicca, has helped millions of people develop a positive, life-affirming connection to the world we live in. Witchcraft instills confidence, is spiritual kung fu for the annihilation of stress, and is potent mojo against mediocrity. Need help conquering acne and tough exams? Wish you had better family communication and a hot date for Friday night? Chock-full of spells, recipes (all made from easily accessible ingredients), and advice from real teen Witches, Where to Park Your Broomstick has all the information you need to practice Witchcraft and conjure up a little magick of your own.

Acceptable Risk

Acceptable Risk

  • Author: Robin Cook
  • Publisher: Penguin
  • ISBN: 9780425151860
  • Category: Fiction
  • Page: 388
  • View: 6915
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The author of Chromosome 6 presents another thriller that gives readers an unsettling glimpse into the dangers of antidepressant drugs and tackles the ethics involved in such personality-altering medications as Prozac. Reissue.

Damned Women

Damned Women

Sinners and Witches in Puritan New England

  • Author: Elizabeth S. Reis
  • Publisher: Cornell University Press
  • ISBN: 1501713337
  • Category: Social Science
  • Page: 240
  • View: 1417
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In her analysis of the cultural construction of gender in early America, Elizabeth Reis explores the intersection of Puritan theology, Puritan evaluations of womanhood, and the Salem witchcraft episodes. She finds in those intersections the basis for understanding why women were accused of witchcraft more often than men, why they confessed more often, and why they frequently accused other women of being witches. In negotiating their beliefs about the devil's powers, both women and men embedded womanhood in the discourse of depravity. Puritan ministers insisted that women and men were equal in the sight of God, with both sexes equally capable of cleaving to Christ or to the devil. Nevertheless, Reis explains, womanhood and evil were inextricably linked in the minds and hearts of seventeenth-century New England Puritans. Women and men feared hell equally but Puritan culture encouraged women to believe it was their vile natures that would take them there rather than the particular sins they might have committed. Following the Salem witchcraft trials, Reis argues, Puritans' understanding of sin and the devil changed. Ministers and laity conceived of a Satan who tempted sinners and presided physically over hell, rather than one who possessed souls in the living world. Women and men became increasingly confident of their redemption, although women more than men continued to imagine themselves as essentially corrupt, even after the Great Awakening.

Pagan Family Values

Pagan Family Values

Childhood and the Religious Imagination in Contemporary American Paganism

  • Author: S. Zohreh Kermani
  • Publisher: NYU Press
  • ISBN: 0814745148
  • Category: Religion
  • Page: 240
  • View: 3640
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For most of its history, contemporary Paganism has been a religion of converts. Yet as it enters its fifth decade, it is incorporating growing numbers of second‑generation Pagans for whom Paganism is a family tradition, not a religious worldview arrived at via a spiritual quest. In Pagan Family Values, S. Zohreh Kermani explores the ways in which North American Pagan families pass on their beliefs to their children, and how the effort to socialize children influences this new religious movement. The first ethnographic study of the everyday lives of contemporary Pagan families, this volume brings their experiences into conversation with contemporary issues in American religion. Through formal interviews with Pagan families, participant observation at various pagan events, and data collected via online surveys, Kermani traces the ways in which Pagan parents transmit their religious values to their children. Rather than seeking to pass along specific religious beliefs, Pagan parents tend to seek to instill values, such as religious tolerance and spiritual independence, that will remain with their children throughout their lives, regardless of these children's ultimate religious identifications. Pagan parents tend to construct an idealized, magical childhood for their children that mirrors their ideal childhoods. The socialization of children thus becomes a means by which adults construct and make meaningful their own identities as Pagans. Kermani’s meticulous fieldwork and clear, engaging writing provide an illuminating look at parenting and religious expression in Pagan households and at how new religions pass on their beliefs to a new generation.

Death in Salem

Death in Salem

The Private Lives behind the 1692 Witch Hunt

  • Author: Diane Foulds
  • Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
  • ISBN: 0762766409
  • Category: History
  • Page: 288
  • View: 7443
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Salem witchcraft will always have a magnetic pull on the American psyche. During the 1692 witch trials, more than 150 people were arrested. An estimated 25 million Americans—including author Diane Foulds—are descended from the twenty individuals executed. What happened to our ancestors? Death in Salem is the first book to take a clear-eyed look at this complex time, by examining the lives of the witch trial participants from a personal perspective. Massachusetts settlers led difficult lives; every player in the Salem drama endured hardships barely imaginable today. Mercy Short, one of the “bewitched” girls, watched as Indians butchered her parents; Puritan minister Cotton Mather outlived all but three of his fifteen children. Such tragedies shaped behavior and, as Foulds argues, ultimately played a part in the witch hunt’s outcome. A compelling “who’s who” to Salem witchcraft, Death in Salem profiles each of these historical personalities as it asks: Why was this person targeted?

The Story of American Freedom

The Story of American Freedom

  • Author: Eric Foner
  • Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
  • ISBN: 9780393319620
  • Category: History
  • Page: 422
  • View: 753
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Chronicles the history of America's pursuit of liberty, tracing the struggles among freed slaves, union organizers, women rights advocates, and other groups to widen freedom's promise

When Time Shall Be No More

When Time Shall Be No More

Prophecy Belief in Modern American Culture

  • Author: Paul Boyer
  • Publisher: Harvard University Press
  • ISBN: 9780674028616
  • Category: History
  • Page: 488
  • View: 8319
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Millions of Americans take the Bible at its word and turn to like-minded local ministers and TV preachers, periodicals and paperbacks for help in finding their place in God's prophetic plan for mankind. And yet, influential as this phenomenon is in the worldview of so many, the belief in biblical prophecy remains a popular mystery, largely unstudied and little understood. "When Time Shall Be No More" offers for the first time an in-depth look at the subtle, pervasive ways in which prophecy belief shapes contemporary American thought and culture. Belief in prophecy dates back to antiquity, and there Paul Boyer begins, seeking out the origins of this particular brand of faith in early Jewish and Christian apocalyptic writings, then tracing its development over time. Against this broad historical overview, the effect of prophecy belief on the events and themes of recent decades emerges in clear and striking detail. Nuclear war, the Soviet Union, Israel and the Middle East, the destiny of the United States, the rise of a computerized global economic order--Boyer shows how impressive feats of exegesis have incorporated all of these in the popular imagination in terms of the Bible's apocalyptic works. Reflecting finally on the tenacity of prophecy belief in our supposedly secular age, Boyer considers the direction such popular conviction might take--and the forms it might assume--in the post-Cold War era. The product of a four-year immersion in the literature and culture of prophecy belief, "When Time Shall Be No More" serves as a pathbreaking guide to this vast terra incognita of contemporary American popular thought-a thorough and thoroughly fascinating index to its sources, its implications, and its enduring appeal.