Search Results for "the-black-campus-movement"

The Black Campus Movement

The Black Campus Movement

Black Students and the Racial Reconstitution of Higher Education, 1965–1972

  • Author: I. Rogers
  • Publisher: Springer
  • ISBN: 1137016507
  • Category: Education
  • Page: 235
  • View: 9970
DOWNLOAD NOW »
This book provides the first national study of this intense and challenging struggle which disrupted and refashioned institutions in almost every state. It also illuminates the context for one of the most transformative educational movements in American history through a history of black higher education and black student activism before 1965.

The Black Campus Movement

The Black Campus Movement

Black Students and the Racial Reconstitution of Higher Education, 1965–1972

  • Author: I. Rogers
  • Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan
  • ISBN: 9780230117808
  • Category: Education
  • Page: 235
  • View: 454
DOWNLOAD NOW »
This book provides the first national study of this intense and challenging struggle which disrupted and refashioned institutions in almost every state. It also illuminates the context for one of the most transformative educational movements in American history through a history of black higher education and black student activism before 1965.

The Black Revolution on Campus

The Black Revolution on Campus

  • Author: Martha Biondi
  • Publisher: Univ of California Press
  • ISBN: 0520282183
  • Category: Education
  • Page: 368
  • View: 6008
DOWNLOAD NOW »
The Black Revolution on Campus is the definitive account of an extraordinary but forgotten chapter of the black freedom struggle. In the late 1960s and early 1970s, Black students organized hundreds of protests that sparked a period of crackdown, negotiation, and reform that profoundly transformed college life. At stake was the very mission of higher education. Black students demanded that public universities serve their communities; that private universities rethink the mission of elite education; and that black colleges embrace self-determination and resist the threat of integration. Most crucially, black students demanded a role in the definition of scholarly knowledge. Martha Biondi masterfully combines impressive research with a wealth of interviews from participants to tell the story of how students turned the slogan “black power” into a social movement. Vividly demonstrating the critical linkage between the student movement and changes in university culture, Biondi illustrates how victories in establishing Black Studies ultimately produced important intellectual innovations that have had a lasting impact on academic research and university curricula over the past 40 years. This book makes a major contribution to the current debate on Ethnic Studies, access to higher education, and opportunity for all.

Higher Education and the Civil Rights Movement

Higher Education and the Civil Rights Movement

White Supremacy, Black Southerners, and College Campuses

  • Author: Peter Wallenstein,Stanley Harrold,Randall M. (FRW) Miller
  • Publisher: N.A
  • ISBN: 9780813034447
  • Category: Education
  • Page: 336
  • View: 9404
DOWNLOAD NOW »
"The first comprehensive study of the process of desegregation as it unfolded during the twentieth century at the flagship universities and white land-grant institutions of the south."--Amy Thompson McCandless, College of Charleston "Broadens the discussion of the civil rights movement to include academic spaces as sites of struggle and contributes to southern history by providing unique accounts of black agency during the dismantling of the Jim Crow South."-- Stephanie Y. Evans, University of Florida Nowhere else can one read about how Brown v. Board of Education transformed higher education on campus after campus, in state after state, across the South. And no other book details the continuing struggle to change each school in the years that followed the enrollment of the first African American students. Institutions of higher education long functioned as bastions of white supremacy and black exclusion. Against the walls of Jim Crow and the powers of state laws, black southerners--prospective students, their parents and families, their lawyers and their communities--struggled to gain access and equity. Higher Education and the Civil Rights Movement examines an understudied aspect of racial history, revealing desegregation to be a process, not an event.

Stamped from the Beginning

Stamped from the Beginning

The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America

  • Author: Ibram X. Kendi
  • Publisher: Nation Books
  • ISBN: 1568584644
  • Category: History
  • Page: 592
  • View: 6314
DOWNLOAD NOW »
A searing history of how racist ideas were created, disseminated, and entrenched in America Winner of the 2016 National Book Award for Nonfiction A New York Times Bestseller A Washington Post Bestseller Finalist for the 2016 National Book Critics Circle Award for Nonfiction Named one of the Best Books of the Year by the Boston Globe, Washington Post, Chicago Review of Books, The Root, Buzzfeed, Bustle, and Entropy "The most ambitious book of 2016."-The Washington Post Some Americans cling desperately to the myth that we are living in a post-racial society, that the election of the first black president spelled the doom of racism. But racist thought is not just alive and well in America--it is more sophisticated and more insidious than ever. And as award-winning historian Ibram X. Kendi argues in Stamped from the Beginning, if we have any hope of grappling with this stark reality, we must first understand how racist ideas were developed, disseminated, and enshrined in American society. In this deeply researched and fast-moving narrative, Kendi chronicles the entire story of anti-black racist ideas and their staggering power over the course of American history. Stamped from the Beginning uses the life stories of five major American intellectuals to offer a window into the contentious debates between assimilationists and segregationists and between racists and antiracists. From Puritan minister Cotton Mather to Thomas Jefferson, from fiery abolitionist William Lloyd Garrison to brilliant scholar W.E.B. Du Bois to legendary anti-prison activist Angela Davis, Kendi shows how and why some of our leading pro-slavery and pro-civil rights thinkers have challenged or helped cement racist ideas in America. Contrary to popular conceptions, racist ideas did not arise from ignorance or hatred. Instead, they were devised and honed by some of the most brilliant minds of each era. These intellectuals used their brilliance to justify and rationalize deeply entrenched discriminatory policies and the nation's racial disparities in everything from wealth to health. And while racist ideas are easily produced and easily consumed, they can also be discredited. In shedding much-needed light on the murky history of racist ideas, Stamped from the Beginning offers us the tools we need to expose them--and in the process, gives us reason to hope.

Black Power on Campus

Black Power on Campus

The University of Illinois, 1965-75

  • Author: Joy Ann Williamson
  • Publisher: University of Illinois Press
  • ISBN: 9780252028298
  • Category: Education
  • Page: 192
  • View: 1619
DOWNLOAD NOW »
Joy Williamson charts the evolution of Black consciousness on predominately white American campuses during the critical period between the mid-sixties and mid-seventies, with the Black student movement at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC) serving as an illuminating microcosm of similar movements across the country. As Williamson shows, increased university admission rates in the late 1960s did not lead to increased acceptance for Black students. In response to institutional apathy, or even hostility, Black students advocated Black unity, celebrated Black culture, and employed aggressive tactics to initiate a period of institutional reform during one of American higher education's most tempestuous eras. Williamson examines the creation of such groups as the Black Students Association at UIUC and looks at the effect the activities of such groups had on the wider student body, on academic administrators, and on university policies. Drawing on student publications of the late 1960s and early 1970s, as well as interviews with former administrators, faculty, and student activists, Williamson discusses the emergence of Black Power ideology, what constitutes "Blackness," and notions of self-advancement versus racial solidarity. Promoting an organic understanding of social protest and assessing the impact of Black student activism on an American campus, Black Power on Campus is an important contribution to the broader literature on African American liberation movements, the role of Black youth in protest movements, and the reform of American higher education.

The Black Student Protest Movement at Rutgers

The Black Student Protest Movement at Rutgers

  • Author: Richard Patrick McCormick
  • Publisher: Rutgers University Press
  • ISBN: 9780813515755
  • Category: Education
  • Page: 155
  • View: 8046
DOWNLOAD NOW »
.

White Money/Black Power

White Money/Black Power

The Surprising History of African American Studies and the Crisis of Race in Higher Education

  • Author: Noliwe M. Rooks
  • Publisher: Beacon Press
  • ISBN: 9780807032718
  • Category: Education
  • Page: 213
  • View: 1678
DOWNLOAD NOW »
White Money/Black Power is a Beacon Press publication.

Rebellion in Black and White

Rebellion in Black and White

Southern Student Activism in the 1960s

  • Author: Robert Cohen,David J. Snyder
  • Publisher: JHU Press
  • ISBN: 1421408511
  • Category: Education
  • Page: 368
  • View: 3294
DOWNLOAD NOW »
Rebellion in Black and White offers a panoramic view of southern student activism in the 1960s. Original scholarly essays demonstrate how southern students promoted desegregation, racial equality, free speech, academic freedom, world peace, gender equity, sexual liberation, Black Power, and the personal freedoms associated with the counterculture of the decade. Most accounts of the 1960s student movement and the New Left have been northern-centered, focusing on rebellions at the University of California, Berkeley, Columbia University, and others. And yet, students at southern colleges and universities also organized and acted to change race and gender relations and to end the Vietnam War. Southern students took longer to rebel due to the south’s legacy of segregation, its military tradition, and its Bible Belt convictions, but their efforts were just as effective as those in the north. Rebellion in Black and White sheds light on higher education, students, culture, and politics of the American south. Edited by Robert Cohen and David J. Snyder, the book features the work of both seasoned historians and a new generation of scholars offering fresh perspectives on the civil rights movement and many others. Contributors: Dan T. CarterDavid T. FarberJelani FavorsWesley HoganChristopher A. HuffNicholas G. MeriwetherGregg L. MichelKelly MorrowDoug RossinowCleveland L. Sellers Jr.Gary S. SprayberryMarcia G. SynnottJeffrey A. TurnerErica WhittingtonJoy Ann Williamson-Lott -- Robin D. G. Kelley, author of Africa Speaks, America Answers: Modern Jazz in Revolutionary Times

Black Students in the Ivory Tower

Black Students in the Ivory Tower

African American Student Activism at the University of Pennsylvania, 1967-1990

  • Author: Wayne Glasker
  • Publisher: Univ of Massachusetts Press
  • ISBN: 9781558493223
  • Category: Education
  • Page: 238
  • View: 5111
DOWNLOAD NOW »
A study of the circumstances surrounding the University of Pennsylvania's decision to increase its black enrolment, and the consequences that followed. Focusing on the role of black student activism, it traces the controversy and debate over issues such as assimilation and integration.

From Black Power to Black Studies

From Black Power to Black Studies

How a Radical Social Movement Became an Academic Discipline

  • Author: Fabio Rojas
  • Publisher: JHU Press
  • ISBN: 0801899710
  • Category: Education
  • Page: 304
  • View: 8338
DOWNLOAD NOW »
Shedding light on the black power movement, Black Studies programs, and American higher education, this historical analysis reveals how radical politics are assimilated into the university system.

Campus Life

Campus Life

  • Author: Helen Lefkowitz Horowitz
  • Publisher: Knopf
  • ISBN: 0307829693
  • Category: Education
  • Page: 336
  • View: 1025
DOWNLOAD NOW »
Every generation of college students, no matter how different from its predecessor, has been an enigma to faculty and administration, to parents, and to society in general. Watching today’s students “holding themselves in because they had to get A’s not only on tests but on deans’ reports and recommendations,” Helen Lefkowitz Horowitz, author of the highly praised Alma Mater, began to ask, “What has gone wrong—how did we get where we are today?” Campus Life is the result of her search—through college studies, alumni autobiographies, and among students themselves—for an answer. She begins in the post-revolutionary years when the peculiarly American form of college was born, forced in the student-faculty warfare: in 1800, pleasure-seeking Princeton students, angered by disciplinary action, “show pistols . . . and rolled barrels filled with stones along the hallways.” She looks deeply into the campus through the next two centuries, to show us student society as revealed and reflected in the students’ own codes of behavior, in the clubs (social and intellectual), in athletics, in student publications, and in student government. And we begin to notice for the first time, from earliest days till now, younger men, and later young women as well, have entered not a monolithic “student body” but a complex world containing three distinct sub-cultures. We see how from the beginning some undergraduates have resisted the ritualized frivolity and rowdiness of the group she calls “College Men.” For the second group, the “Outsiders,” college was not so much a matter of secret societies, passionate team spirit and college patriotism as a serious preparation for a profession; and over the decades their ranks were joined by ambitious youths from all over rural America, by the first college women, by immigrants, Jews, “townies,” blacks, veterans, and older women beginning or continuing their education. We watch a third subculture of “Rebels”—both men and women – emerging in the early twentieth century, transforming individual dissent into collective rebellion, contending for control of collegiate politics and press, and eventually—in the 1960s—reordering the whole college/university world. Yet, Horowitz demonstrates, in spite of the tumultuous 1960s, in spite of the vast changes since the nineteenth century, the ways in which undergraduates work and play have continued to be shaped by whichever of the three competing subcultures—college men and women, outsiders, and rebels—is in control. We see today’s campus as dominated by the new breed of outsiders (they began to surface in the 1970s) driven to pursue their future careers with a “grim professionalism.” And as faint and sporadic signs emerge of (perhaps) a new activism, and a new attraction to learning for its own sake, we find that Helen Lefkowitz Horowitz has given us, in this study, a basis for anticipated the possible nature of the next campus generation.

Campus Wars

Campus Wars

The Peace Movement at American State Universities in the Vietnam Era

  • Author: Kenneth J. Heineman
  • Publisher: NYU Press
  • ISBN: 0814735126
  • Category: History
  • Page: 366
  • View: 6683
DOWNLOAD NOW »
In many parts of the African Muslim world, slavery still blights the landscape. What are the origins of this terrible institution? Why is it still practiced? How widespread is it and how does it differ from Western chattel slavery? This book tells the story of how the enslavement of Africans by Berbers, Arabs, and other Africans became institutionalized and legitimized throughout Muslim Africa. A classic, pioneering study, first published in 1971 and extensively updated in this revised edition, Slavery in the History of Black Muslim Africa provides an expansive portrait of domestic slavery from the tenth to the nineteenth century in the context of the religious, social, and economic conditions of the African Islamic world. Drawing on a host of accounts from contemporary observers such as Leo Africanus and Ibn Battuta, Fisher and Fisher describe the status and rights of slaves in Africa, and their various roles as currency, goods, eunuchs, soldiers, and statesmen, as well as the jarring historical interruption brought on by slave raiders and traders in West and North Africa.

Radicalizing the ebony tower

Radicalizing the ebony tower

Black colleges and the Black freedom struggle in Mississippi

  • Author: Joy Ann Williamson
  • Publisher: Teachers College Pr
  • ISBN: 9780807748633
  • Category: Education
  • Page: 214
  • View: 1789
DOWNLOAD NOW »
This is a profoundly moving story of Black colleges in Mississippi during a watershed moment in their history. It is also the story of young Americans trying to balance their pursuit of higher education with the parallel struggle for civil rights. Radicalizing the Ebony Tower examines colleges against the backdrop of the black freedom struggle of the middle twentieth century, a highly contentious conflict between state agents determined to protect the racial hierarchy and activists equally determined to cripple white supremacy. Activists demanded that colleges play a central role in the Civil Rights Movement (a distinct challenge to the notion of the ivory tower) while state agents demanded that colleges distance themselves from the black freedom struggle and promised to mete out harsh penalties if they did not. Through the words and deeds of actual participants, this path-breaking study documents how activists ultimately transformed non-political institutions into libratory agents

Young Activists

Young Activists

American High School Students in the Age of Protest

  • Author: Gael Graham
  • Publisher: N.A
  • ISBN: 9780875803517
  • Category: Education
  • Page: 256
  • View: 6038
DOWNLOAD NOW »
The traumas and controversies of the 1960s—the civil rights movement, the Vietnam War, and the pervasive antiauthoritarian spirit so evident on college campuses—infiltrated American public high schools. Students challenging their relegation to the world of children demanded the right to express their political views and to have a voice in decisions about their education. Adopting the activist tactics of the times, they organized strikes and demonstrations, initiated petitions and boycotts, and sought recourse through lawsuits and occasional violence. As racial tensions flared across the country, high schools became a crucial arena for the civil rights movement. Drawing upon the memories of students and teachers as well as education journals, court cases, and news magazines, Young Activists provides an insider's look at desegregation in all regions of the country, with a candid discussion of Black and Brown Power militancy and the reaction of white students. Debates about the war in Vietnam also rattled the high schools as young men and women—potential draftees and their colleagues—clashed over their judgments of American policy. In addition to these large social issues, student activists had their own specific agendas: relaxing dress codes, taking part in school governance, and initiating changes to the curriculum. School authorities responded, warily but often positively. By the time activism waned in the mid-1970s, students had succeeded in making their high schools more open, more democratic, and more in tune with the times. Graham demonstrates that, although teenagers were indisputably influenced by the events reshaping the wider world, they were neither pawns nor mere mimics of their elders. Rather, they drew upon the rhetoric and strategies available to them in the 1960s to promote their own interests.

Upending the Ivory Tower

Upending the Ivory Tower

Civil Rights, Black Power, and the Ivy League

  • Author: Stefan M. Bradley
  • Publisher: NYU Press
  • ISBN: 1479819271
  • Category: History
  • Page: 480
  • View: 9581
DOWNLOAD NOW »
The inspiring story of the black students, faculty, and administrators who forever changed America’s leading educational institutions and paved the way for social justice and racial progress The eight elite institutions that comprise the Ivy League, sometimes known as the Ancient Eight—Harvard, Yale, Princeton, Penn, Columbia, Brown, Dartmouth, and Cornell—are American stalwarts that have profoundly influenced history and culture by producing the nation’s and the world’s leaders. The few black students who attended Ivy League schools in the decades following WWII not only went on to greatly influence black America and the nation in general, but unquestionably awakened these most traditional and selective of American spaces. In the twentieth century, black youth were in the vanguard of the black freedom movement and educational reform. Upending the Ivory Tower illuminates how the Black Power movement, which was borne out of an effort to edify the most disfranchised of the black masses, also took root in the hallowed halls of America’s most esteemed institutions of higher education. Between the close of WWII and 1975, the civil rights and Black Power movements transformed the demographics and operation of the Ivy League on and off campus. As desegregators and racial pioneers, black students, staff, and faculty used their status in the black intelligentsia to enhance their predominantly white institutions while advancing black freedom. Although they were often marginalized because of their race and class, the newcomers altered educational policies and inserted blackness into the curricula and culture of the unabashedly exclusive and starkly white schools. This book attempts to complete the narrative of higher education history, while adding a much needed nuance to the history of the Black Power movement. It tells the stories of those students, professors, staff, and administrators who pushed for change at the risk of losing what privilege they had. Putting their status, and sometimes even their lives, in jeopardy, black activists negotiated, protested, and demonstrated to create opportunities for the generations that followed. The enrichments these change agents made endure in the diversity initiatives and activism surrounding issues of race that exist in the modern Ivy League. Upending the Ivory Tower not only informs the civil rights and Black Power movements of the postwar era but also provides critical context for the Black Lives Matter movement that is growing in the streets and on campuses throughout the country today. As higher education continues to be a catalyst for change, there is no one better to inform today’s activists than those who transformed our country’s past and paved the way for its future.

Being Black, Being Male on Campus

Being Black, Being Male on Campus

Understanding and Confronting Black Male Collegiate Experiences

  • Author: Derrick R. Brooms
  • Publisher: SUNY Press
  • ISBN: 1438464010
  • Category: Education
  • Page: 266
  • View: 1522
DOWNLOAD NOW »
Explores how race and gender matter on campus and how Black males navigate college for academic and personal success. This work marks a radical shift away from the pervasive focus on the challenges that Black male students face and the deficit rhetoric that often limits perspectives about them. Instead, Derrick R. Brooms offers reflective counter-narratives of success. Being Black, Being Male on Campus uses in-depth interviews to investigate the collegiate experiences of Black male students at historically White institutions. Framed through Critical Race Theory and Blackmaleness, the study provides new analysis on the utility and importance of Black Male Initiatives (BMIs). This work explores Black men’s perceptions, identity constructions, and ambitions, while it speaks meaningfully to how race and gender intersect as they influence students’ experiences. “Well written and informative, this exciting project cuts across many of the strengths of previous publications and fills significant theoretical and methodological gaps by focusing on authentically voiced Black men who are finding and making their way in higher education and in life.” — James Earl Davis, coeditor of Educating African American Males: Contexts for Consideration, Possibilities for Practice

Academic Freedom in an Age of Conformity

Academic Freedom in an Age of Conformity

Confronting the Fear of Knowledge

  • Author: Joanna Williams
  • Publisher: Springer
  • ISBN: 1137514795
  • Category: Education
  • Page: 217
  • View: 9345
DOWNLOAD NOW »
Academic freedom is increasingly being threatened by a stifling culture of conformity in higher education that is restricting individual academics, the freedom of academic thought and the progress of knowledge – the very foundations upon which academia and universities are built. Once, scholars demanded academic freedom to critique existing knowledge and to pursue new truths. Today, while fondness for the rhetoric of academic freedom remains, it is increasingly criticised as an outdated and elitist concept by students and lecturers alike and called into question by a number of political and intellectual trends such as feminism, critical theory and identity politics. This provocative and compelling book traces the demise of academic freedom within the context of changing ideas about the purpose of the university and the nature of knowledge. The book argues that a challenge to this culture of conformity and censorship and a defence of academic free speech are needed for critique to be possible and for the intellectual project of evaluating existing knowledge and proposing new knowledge to be meaningful. This book is that challenge and a passionate call to arms for the power of academic thought today.

Black Politics / White Power

Black Politics / White Power

Civil Rights, Black Power, and the Black Panthers in New Haven

  • Author: Yohuru Williams
  • Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell
  • ISBN: 9781881089605
  • Category: History
  • Page: 240
  • View: 3526
DOWNLOAD NOW »
The popular media have portrayed the Black Panthers mainly for the rhetoric of violence some members employed and for the associations between the Panthers and a black militancy drawing on racial hostility to whites in general. Overlooked have been the efforts that branches of the organization undertook for practical economic and social progress within African-American neighborhoods, frequently in alliance with whites. Yohuru Williams' study of black politics in New Haven culminating in the arrival of the Panthers argues that the increasing militancy in the black community there was motivated not by abstractions of black cultural integrity but by the continuing frustrations the leadership suffered in its dealings with the city's white liberal establishment. Black Politics/White Power is an important contribution to a discovery of the complexities of racial politics during the angry late sixties and early seventies.

Harlem vs. Columbia University

Harlem vs. Columbia University

Black Student Power in the Late 1960s

  • Author: Stefan M. Bradley
  • Publisher: University of Illinois Press
  • ISBN: 0252090586
  • Category: Social Science
  • Page: 272
  • View: 1174
DOWNLOAD NOW »
In 1968-69, Columbia University became the site for a collision of American social movements. Black Power, student power, antiwar, New Left, and Civil Rights movements all clashed with local and state politics when an alliance of black students and residents of Harlem and Morningside Heights openly protested the school's ill-conceived plan to build a large, private gymnasium in the small green park that separates the elite university from Harlem. Railing against the university's expansion policy, protesters occupied administration buildings and met violent opposition from both fellow students and the police. In this dynamic book, Stefan M. Bradley describes the impact of Black Power ideology on the Students' Afro-American Society (SAS) at Columbia. While white students--led by Mark Rudd and Students for a Democratic Society (SDS)--sought to radicalize the student body and restructure the university, black students focused on stopping the construction of the gym in Morningside Park. Through separate, militant action, black students and the black community stood up to the power of an Ivy League institution and stopped it from trampling over its relatively poor and powerless neighbors. Bradley also compares the events at Columbia with similar events at Harvard, Cornell, Yale, and the University of Pennsylvania.