Search Results for "the-blood-of-guatemala"

The Blood of Guatemala

The Blood of Guatemala

A History of Race and Nation

  • Author: Greg Grandin
  • Publisher: Duke University Press
  • ISBN: 9780822324959
  • Category: History
  • Page: 343
  • View: 6367
DOWNLOAD NOW »
DIVA study of the political and cultural formation of one of Guatemala's indigenous communities that explores the nationalization of ethnicity, the preservation of Mayan identity, and the formation of a brutally repressive state./div

Who Is Rigoberta Menchu?

Who Is Rigoberta Menchu?

  • Author: Greg Grandin
  • Publisher: Verso Books
  • ISBN: 1844674584
  • Category: History
  • Page: 159
  • View: 7332
DOWNLOAD NOW »
In 1984, Nobel Peace Prize–winner and indigenous rights activist RigobertaMenchú published I, RigobertaMenchú, her autobiographical account of life in Guatemala undera military dictatorship to great acclaim. The book rapidly transformedthe study and understanding of modern Guatemalan history. Since then,her memoir has increasingly become a target for rightwing historians andcommentators seeking to discredit Menchú’s account and to deny thegenocide carried out by the Guatemalan military regime with US support.Greg Grandin, in this crucial accompaniment to Menchú’s work, takes onher critics to set the story straight. He investigates the historical contextand political realities that underlie Menchú’s past and the ongoing debatesurrounding it, in this substantial new work on Guatemalan history.

The Last Colonial Massacre

The Last Colonial Massacre

Latin America in the Cold War

  • Author: Greg Grandin
  • Publisher: University of Chicago Press
  • ISBN: 9780226306872
  • Category: History
  • Page: 336
  • View: 4665
DOWNLOAD NOW »
After decades of bloody revolutions and political terror, many scholars and politicians lament the rise and brief influence of the left in Latin America; since the triumph of Castro they have accused the left there of rejecting democracy, embracing Communist totalitarianism, and prompting both revolutionary violence and a right-wing backlash. The Last Colonial Massacre challenges these views. Using Guatemala as a case study, Greg Grandin argues that the Cold War in Latin America was a struggle not between American liberalism and Soviet Communism but between two visions of democracy. The main effect of United States intervention in Latin America, Grandin shows, was not the containment of Communism but the elimination of home-grown concepts of social democracy. Through unprecedented archival research and gripping personal testimonies, Grandin uncovers the hidden history of the Latin American Cold War: of hidebound reactionaries intent on holding on to their own power and privilege; of Mayan Marxists, blending indigenous notions of justice with universal ideas of freedom and equality; and of a United States supporting new styles of state terror throughout the continent. Drawing from declassified U.S. documents, Grandin exposes Washington's involvement in the 1966 secret execution of more than thirty Guatemalan leftists, which, he argues, prefigured the later wave of disappearances in Chile and Argentina. Impassioned but judicious, The Last Colonial Massacre is history of the highest order—a work that will dramatically recast our understanding of Latin American politics and the triumphal role of the United States in the Cold War and beyond.

A Short History of Guatemala

A Short History of Guatemala

  • Author: Ralph Lee Woodward
  • Publisher: N.A
  • ISBN: 9789992279724
  • Category: Guatemala
  • Page: 199
  • View: 4170
DOWNLOAD NOW »
In A SHORT HISTORY OF GUATEMALA, Ralph Lee Woodward, Jr. (Ph.D., Tulane University, 1962) briefly synthesizes the exciting history of Guatemala from its ancient Maya heritage to the present. Based on nearly a half-century of research on the history of this Central American republic, the work highlights the political, economic, and social evolution of Guatemala, with particular emphasis on the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. With keen insight into the struggle for economic and social development since national independence in 1821, Woodward offers a new interpretation of the country's past and present

A Century of Revolution

A Century of Revolution

Insurgent and Counterinsurgent Violence during Latin America’s Long Cold War

  • Author: Gilbert M. Joseph,Greg Grandin
  • Publisher: Duke University Press
  • ISBN: 0822392852
  • Category: History
  • Page: 456
  • View: 6353
DOWNLOAD NOW »
Latin America experienced an epochal cycle of revolutionary upheavals and insurgencies during the twentieth century, from the Mexican Revolution of 1910 through the mobilizations and terror in Central America, the Southern Cone, and the Andes during the 1970s and 1980s. In his introduction to A Century of Revolution, Greg Grandin argues that the dynamics of political violence and terror in Latin America are so recognizable in their enforcement of domination, their generation and maintenance of social exclusion, and their propulsion of historical change, that historians have tended to take them for granted, leaving unexamined important questions regarding their form and meaning. The essays in this groundbreaking collection take up these questions, providing a sociologically and historically nuanced view of the ideological hardening and accelerated polarization that marked Latin America’s twentieth century. Attentive to the interplay among overlapping local, regional, national, and international fields of power, the contributors focus on the dialectical relations between revolutionary and counterrevolutionary processes and their unfolding in the context of U.S. hemispheric and global hegemony. Through their fine-grained analyses of events in Chile, Colombia, Cuba, El Salvador, Guatemala, Mexico, Nicaragua, and Peru, they suggest a framework for interpreting the experiential nature of political violence while also analyzing its historical causes and consequences. In so doing, they set a new agenda for the study of revolutionary change and political violence in twentieth-century Latin America. Contributors Michelle Chase Jeffrey L. Gould Greg Grandin Lillian Guerra Forrest Hylton Gilbert M. Joseph Friedrich Katz Thomas Miller Klubock Neil Larsen Arno J. Mayer Carlota McAllister Jocelyn Olcott Gerardo Rénique Corey Robin Peter Winn

Empire's Workshop

Empire's Workshop

Latin America, the United States, and the Rise of the New Imperialism

  • Author: Greg Grandin
  • Publisher: Metropolitan Books
  • ISBN: 9781429959155
  • Category: History
  • Page: 304
  • View: 8215
DOWNLOAD NOW »
An eye-opening examination of Latin America's role as proving ground for U.S. imperial strategies and tactics In recent years, one book after another has sought to take the measure of the Bush administration's aggressive foreign policy. In their search for precedents, they invoke the Roman and British empires as well as postwar reconstructions of Germany and Japan. Yet they consistently ignore the one place where the United States had its most formative imperial experience: Latin America. A brilliant excavation of a long-obscured history, Empire's Workshop is the first book to show how Latin America has functioned as a laboratory for American extraterritorial rule. Historian Greg Grandin follows the United States' imperial operations, from Thomas Jefferson's aspirations for an "empire of liberty" in Cuba and Spanish Florida, to Ronald Reagan's support for brutally oppressive but U.S.-friendly regimes in Central America. He traces the origins of Bush's policies to Latin America, where many of the administration's leading lights—John Negroponte, Elliott Abrams, Otto Reich—first embraced the deployment of military power to advance free-market economics and first enlisted the evangelical movement in support of their ventures. With much of Latin America now in open rebellion against U.S. domination, Grandin concludes with a vital question: If Washington has failed to bring prosperity and democracy to Latin America—its own backyard "workshop"—what are the chances it will do so for the world?

A Finger in the Wound

A Finger in the Wound

Body Politics in Quincentennial Guatemala

  • Author: Diane M. Nelson
  • Publisher: Univ of California Press
  • ISBN: 9780520920606
  • Category: Social Science
  • Page: 448
  • View: 5982
DOWNLOAD NOW »
Many Guatemalans speak of Mayan indigenous organizing as "a finger in the wound." Diane Nelson explores the implications of this painfully graphic metaphor in her far-reaching study of the civil war and its aftermath. Why use a body metaphor? What body is wounded, and how does it react to apparent further torture? If this is the condition of the body politic, how do human bodies relate to it—those literally wounded in thirty-five years of war and those locked in the equivocal embrace of sexual conquest, domestic labor, mestizaje, and social change movements? Supported by three and a half years of fieldwork since 1985, Nelson addresses these questions—along with the jokes, ambivalences, and structures of desire that surround them—in both concrete and theoretical terms. She explores the relations among Mayan cultural rights activists, ladino (nonindigenous) Guatemalans, the state as a site of struggle, and transnational forces including Nobel Peace Prizes, UN Conventions, neo-liberal economics, global TV, and gringo anthropologists. Along with indigenous claims and their effect on current attempts at reconstituting civilian authority after decades of military rule, Nelson investigates the notion of Quincentennial Guatemala, which has given focus to the overarching question of Mayan—and Guatemalan—identity. Her work draws from political economy, cultural studies, and psychoanalysis, and has special relevance to ongoing discussions of power, hegemony, and the production of subject positions, as well as gender issues and histories of violence as they relate to postcolonial nation-state formation.

The Guatemala Reader

The Guatemala Reader

History, Culture, Politics

  • Author: Greg Grandin,Elizabeth Oglesby
  • Publisher: Duke University Press
  • ISBN: 0822351072
  • Category: History
  • Page: 663
  • View: 2980
DOWNLOAD NOW »
DIVAn interdisciplinary anthology on the largest, most populous nation in Central America, covering Guatemalan history, culture, literature and politics and containing many primary sources not previously published in English./div

Adiós Niño

Adiós Niño

The Gangs of Guatemala City and the Politics of Death

  • Author: Deborah T. Levenson
  • Publisher: Duke University Press
  • ISBN: 0822353156
  • Category: History
  • Page: 183
  • View: 5486
DOWNLOAD NOW »
This ethnohistory examines how the Guatemalan gangs that emerged from the country's strong populist movement in the 1980s had become perpetrators of nihilist violence by the early 2000s.

Health Care in Maya Guatemala

Health Care in Maya Guatemala

Confronting Medical Pluralism in a Developing Country

  • Author: John Palmer Hawkins
  • Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press
  • ISBN: 9780806138596
  • Category: Medical
  • Page: 268
  • View: 3160
DOWNLOAD NOW »
This book examines medical systems and institutions in three K'iche' Maya communities to reveal the conflicts between indigenous medical care and the Guatemalan biomedical system. It shows the necessity of cultural understanding if poor people are to have access to medicine that combines the best of both local tradition and international biomedicine.

Revolution in the Countryside

Revolution in the Countryside

Rural Conflict and Agrarian Reform in Guatemala, 1944-1954

  • Author: Jim Handy
  • Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press
  • ISBN: 0807861898
  • Category: History
  • Page: 284
  • View: 5244
DOWNLOAD NOW »
Although most discussions of the Guatemalan "revolution" of 1944-54 focus on international and national politics, Revolution in the Countryside presents a more complex and integrated picture of this decade. Jim Handy examines the rural poor, both Maya and Ladino, as key players who had a decisive impact on the nature of change in Guatemala. He looks at the ways in which ethnic and class relations affected government policy and identifies the conflict generated in the countryside by new economic and social policies. Handy provides the most detailed discussion yet of the Guatemalan agrarian reform, and he shows how peasant organizations extended its impact by using it to lay claim to land, despite attempts by agrarian officials and the president to apply the law strictly. By focusing on changes in rural communities, and by detailing the coercive measures used to reverse the "revolution in the countryside" following the overthrow of President Jacobo Arbenz Guzman, Handy provides a framework for interpreting more recent events in Guatemala, especially the continuing struggle for land and democracy.

The Empire of Necessity

The Empire of Necessity

Slavery, Freedom, and Deception in the New World

  • Author: Greg Grandin
  • Publisher: Metropolitan Books
  • ISBN: 1429943173
  • Category: History
  • Page: 384
  • View: 5796
DOWNLOAD NOW »
From the acclaimed author of Fordlandia, the story of a remarkable slave rebellion that illuminates America's struggle with slavery and freedom during the Age of Revolution and beyond One morning in 1805, off a remote island in the South Pacific, Captain Amasa Delano, a New England seal hunter, climbed aboard a distressed Spanish ship carrying scores of West Africans he thought were slaves. They weren't. Having earlier seized control of the vessel and slaughtered most of the crew, they were staging an elaborate ruse, acting as if they were humble servants. When Delano, an idealistic, anti-slavery republican, finally realized the deception, he responded with explosive violence. Drawing on research on four continents, The Empire of Necessity explores the multiple forces that culminated in this extraordinary event—an event that already inspired Herman Melville's masterpiece Benito Cereno. Now historian Greg Grandin, with the gripping storytelling that was praised in Fordlandia, uses the dramatic happenings of that day to map a new transnational history of slavery in the Americas, capturing the clash of peoples, economies, and faiths that was the New World in the early 1800s.

Blood Brothers

Blood Brothers

  • Author: Steve J. King
  • Publisher: N.A
  • ISBN: 9781420844856
  • Category: Fiction
  • Page: 232
  • View: 585
DOWNLOAD NOW »
This book describes all the different feelings I have felt throughout my life about love. Times when I thought I was in love and times when I was in love. These feelings for me started as a teenager and continued during my life. Sometimes we can't explain to our love ones what we need to say, and since I have that gift, I want to share it with all the lovers and friends throughout the world.

Paper Cadavers

Paper Cadavers

The Archives of Dictatorship in Guatemala

  • Author: Kirsten Weld
  • Publisher: Duke University Press
  • ISBN: 082237658X
  • Category: History
  • Page: 352
  • View: 6849
DOWNLOAD NOW »
In Paper Cadavers, an inside account of the astonishing discovery and rescue of Guatemala's secret police archives, Kirsten Weld probes the politics of memory, the wages of the Cold War, and the stakes of historical knowledge production. After Guatemala's bloody thirty-six years of civil war (1960–1996), silence and impunity reigned. That is, until 2005, when human rights investigators stumbled on the archives of the country's National Police, which, at 75 million pages, proved to be the largest trove of secret state records ever found in Latin America. The unearthing of the archives renewed fierce debates about history, memory, and justice. In Paper Cadavers, Weld explores Guatemala's struggles to manage this avalanche of evidence of past war crimes, providing a firsthand look at how postwar justice activists worked to reconfigure terror archives into implements of social change. Tracing the history of the police files as they were transformed from weapons of counterinsurgency into tools for post-conflict reckoning, Weld sheds light on the country's fraught transition from war to an uneasy peace, reflecting on how societies forget and remember political violence.

Fordlandia

Fordlandia

The Rise and Fall of Henry Ford's Forgotten Jungle City

  • Author: Greg Grandin
  • Publisher: Metropolitan Books
  • ISBN: 9781429938013
  • Category: History
  • Page: 432
  • View: 4247
DOWNLOAD NOW »
The stunning, never before told story of the quixotic attempt to recreate small-town America in the heart of the Amazon In 1927, Henry Ford, the richest man in the world, bought a tract of land twice the size of Delaware in the Brazilian Amazon. His intention was to grow rubber, but the project rapidly evolved into a more ambitious bid to export America itself, along with its golf courses, ice-cream shops, bandstands, indoor plumbing, and Model Ts rolling down broad streets. Fordlandia, as the settlement was called, quickly became the site of an epic clash. On one side was the car magnate, lean, austere, the man who reduced industrial production to its simplest motions; on the other, the Amazon, lush, extravagant, the most complex ecological system on the planet. Ford's early success in imposing time clocks and square dances on the jungle soon collapsed, as indigenous workers, rejecting his midwestern Puritanism, turned the place into a ribald tropical boomtown. Fordlandia's eventual demise as a rubber plantation foreshadowed the practices that today are laying waste to the rain forest. More than a parable of one man's arrogant attempt to force his will on the natural world, Fordlandia depicts a desperate quest to salvage the bygone America that the Ford factory system did much to dispatch. As Greg Grandin shows in this gripping and mordantly observed history, Ford's great delusion was not that the Amazon could be tamed but that the forces of capitalism, once released, might yet be contained. Fordlandia is a 2009 National Book Award Finalist for Nonfiction.

La Patria del Criollo

La Patria del Criollo

An Interpretation of Colonial Guatemala

  • Author: Severo Martinez Pelaez
  • Publisher: Duke University Press
  • ISBN: 0822392062
  • Category: History
  • Page: 382
  • View: 1239
DOWNLOAD NOW »
This translation of Severo Martínez Peláez’s La Patria del Criollo, first published in Guatemala in 1970, makes a classic, controversial work of Latin American history available to English-language readers. Martínez Peláez was one of Guatemala’s foremost historians and a political activist committed to revolutionary social change. La Patria del Criollo is his scathing assessment of Guatemala’s colonial legacy. Martínez Peláez argues that Guatemala remains a colonial society because the conditions that arose centuries ago when imperial Spain held sway have endured. He maintains that economic circumstances that assure prosperity for a few and deprivation for the majority were altered neither by independence in 1821 nor by liberal reform following 1871. The few in question are an elite group of criollos, people of Spanish descent born in Guatemala; the majority are predominantly Maya Indians, whose impoverishment is shared by many mixed-race Guatemalans. Martínez Peláez asserts that “the coffee dictatorships were the full and radical realization of criollo notions of the patria.” This patria, or homeland, was one that criollos had wrested from Spaniards in the name of independence and taken control of based on claims of liberal reform. He contends that since labor is needed to make land productive, the exploitation of labor, particularly Indian labor, was a necessary complement to criollo appropriation. His depiction of colonial reality is bleak, and his portrayal of Spanish and criollo behavior toward Indians unrelenting in its emphasis on cruelty and oppression. Martínez Peláez felt that the grim past he documented surfaces each day in an equally grim present, and that confronting the past is a necessary step in any effort to improve Guatemala’s woes. An extensive introduction situates La Patria del Criollo in historical context and relates it to contemporary issues and debates.

Buried Secrets

Buried Secrets

Truth and Human Rights in Guatemala

  • Author: Victoria Sanford
  • Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan
  • ISBN: 9781403960238
  • Category: History
  • Page: 313
  • View: 1507
DOWNLOAD NOW »
An expos of Guatemala's genocidal campaign against the Maya in the late 1970s and mid-1980s documents the massacres and displacements that took place as well as the experiences of Maya survivors seeking justice and healing.

Kissinger's Shadow

Kissinger's Shadow

The Long Reach of America's Most Controversial Statesman

  • Author: Greg Grandin
  • Publisher: Metropolitan Books
  • ISBN: 1627794506
  • Category: Biography & Autobiography
  • Page: 224
  • View: 8408
DOWNLOAD NOW »
A new account of America's most controversial diplomat that moves beyond praise or condemnation to reveal Kissinger as the architect of America's current imperial stance In his fascinating new book Kissinger's Shadow, acclaimed historian Greg Grandin argues that to understand the crisis of contemporary America—its never-ending wars abroad and political polarization at home—we have to understand Henry Kissinger. Examining Kissinger's own writings, as well as a wealth of newly declassified documents, Grandin reveals how Richard Nixon's top foreign policy advisor, even as he was presiding over defeat in Vietnam and a disastrous, secret, and illegal war in Cambodia, was helping to revive a militarized version of American exceptionalism centered on an imperial presidency. Believing that reality could be bent to his will, insisting that intuition is more important in determining policy than hard facts, and vowing that past mistakes should never hinder future bold action, Kissinger anticipated, even enabled, the ascendance of the neoconservative idealists who took America into crippling wars in Afghanistan and Iraq. Going beyond accounts focusing either on Kissinger's crimes or accomplishments, Grandin offers a compelling new interpretation of the diplomat's continuing influence on how the United States views its role in the world.

Testimony

Testimony

death of a Guatemalan village

  • Author: Victor Montejo
  • Publisher: Curbstone Pr
  • ISBN: N.A
  • Category: History
  • Page: 113
  • View: 4208
DOWNLOAD NOW »
A former rural schoolteacher gives an account of a village (fictitious name) and villagers destroyed by elements of the Guatamalan army in search of revolutionaries and guerrillas.