Search Results for "the-irish-way"

The Irish Way

The Irish Way

Becoming American in the Multiethnic City

  • Author: James R. Barrett
  • Publisher: Penguin
  • ISBN: 1101560592
  • Category: History
  • Page: 400
  • View: 6004
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A lively, street-level history of turn-of-the-century urban life explores the Americanizing influence of the Irish on successive waves of migrants to the American city. In the newest volume in the award-winning Penguin History of American Life series, James R. Barrett chronicles how a new urban American identity was forged in the streets, saloons, churches, and workplaces of the American city. This process of “Americanization from the bottom up” was deeply shaped by the Irish. From Lower Manhattan to the South Side of Chicago to Boston’s North End, newer waves of immigrants and African Americans found it nearly impossible to avoid the Irish. While historians have emphasized the role of settlement houses and other mainstream institutions in Americanizing immigrants, Barrett makes the original case that the culture absorbed by newcomers upon reaching American shores had a distinctly Hibernian cast. By 1900, there were more people of Irish descent in New York City than in Dublin; more in the United States than in all of Ireland. But in the late nineteenth century, the sources of immigration began to shift, to southern and eastern Europe and beyond. Whether these newcomers wanted to save their souls, get a drink, find a job, or just take a stroll in the neighborhood, they had to deal with entrenched Irish Americans. Barrett reveals how the Irish vacillated between a progressive and idealistic impulse toward their fellow immigrants and a parochial defensiveness stemming from the hostility earlier generations had faced upon their own arrival in America. They imparted racist attitudes toward African Americans; they established ethnic “deadlines” across city neighborhoods; they drove other immigrants from docks, factories, and labor unions. Yet the social teachings of the Catholic Church, a sense of solidarity with the oppressed, and dark memories of poverty and violence in both Ireland and America ushered in a wave of progressive political activism that eventually embraced other immigrants. Drawing on contemporary sociological studies and diaries, newspaper accounts, and Irish American literature, The Irish Way illustrates how the interactions between the Irish and later immigrants on the streets, on the vaudeville stage, in Catholic churches, and in workplaces helped forge a multiethnic American identity that has a profound legacy in our cities today.

The Irish Way

The Irish Way

Becoming American in the Multiethnic City

  • Author: James R. Barrett
  • Publisher: Penguin Paperbacks
  • ISBN: 9780143122807
  • Category: History
  • Page: 384
  • View: 1765
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A lively, street-level history of turn-of-the-century urban life explores the Americanizing influence of the Irish on successive waves of migrants to the American city.

The Irish Way

The Irish Way

Becoming American in the Multiethnic City

  • Author: James R. Barrett
  • Publisher: Penguin Press HC
  • ISBN: 9781594203251
  • Category: History
  • Page: 384
  • View: 7054
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A lively history of turn-of-the-20th-century urban life in major cities as experienced and influenced by Irish Americans makes a case that urban culture was largely shaped by people with a distinctly Hibernian heritage, explaining that the descendants of Irish immigrants imposed their own values, beliefs and prejudices on subsequent newcomers. By the author of The Tragedy of American Radicalism. 30,000 first printing.

The Irish Way

The Irish Way

A Walk Through Ireland's Past and Present

  • Author: Robert Emmett Ginna
  • Publisher: Counterpoint Press
  • ISBN: 9781593761127
  • Category: History
  • Page: 398
  • View: 8621
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Traces the story of the author's walking journey throughout Ireland, in a narrative collection of songs, poetry, and stories that pays tribute to the region's heroes, saints, and notorious figures. Original.

No Way Out

No Way Out

The Irish in Wartime France, 1939-1945

  • Author: Isadore Ryan
  • Publisher: N.A
  • ISBN: 9781781174876
  • Category: France
  • Page: 351
  • View: 1502
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After the Germans invaded in 1940, at least 2,000 Irish people found themselves trapped in France. Intent on staying alive, most kept their heads down, but some became involved to varying degrees: here are their experiences and misadventures.

My Father's Wake

My Father's Wake

How the Irish Teach Us to Live, Love, and Die

  • Author: Kevin Toolis
  • Publisher: Da Capo Press
  • ISBN: 0306921456
  • Category: Biography & Autobiography
  • Page: 288
  • View: 9620
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An intimate, lyrical look at the ancient rite of the Irish wake--and the Irish way of overcoming our fear of death Death is a whisper for most of us. Instinctively we feel we should dim the lights, pull the curtains, and speak softly. But on a remote island off the coast of Ireland's County Mayo, death has a louder voice. Each day, along with reports of incoming Atlantic storms, the local radio runs a daily roll call of the recently departed. The islanders go in great numbers, young and old alike, to be with their dead. They keep vigil with the corpse and the bereaved company through the long hours of the night. They dig the grave with their own hands and carry the coffin on their own shoulders. The islanders cherish the dead--and amid the sorrow, they celebrate life, too. In My Father's Wake, acclaimed author and award-winning filmmaker Kevin Toolis unforgettably describes his own father's wake and explores the wider history and significance of this ancient and eternal Irish ritual. Perhaps we, too, can all find a better way to deal with our mortality--by living and loving as the Irish do.

The Greatest Brigade

The Greatest Brigade

How the Irish Brigade Cleared the Way to Victory in the American Civil War

  • Author: Thomas J. Craughwell
  • Publisher: Fair Winds Press (MA)
  • ISBN: 1592334784
  • Category: History
  • Page: 240
  • View: 2758
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The Irish Brigade played a key role in all the major battles including the Peninsula Campaign, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, Petersburg, and Appomattox and wasn’t decommissioned until WWI. It was full of larger than life characters and effectively led by a charismatic commander who was court marshaled for revolutionary activity in Ireland and was dismissed to enable him to serve in the war. Some numbers say that this unit lost more than 4,000 soldiers, one of the largest body counts of any brigade, if not the largest. This is a tale of a critical and incredible fighting force, packed with immigrants that helped win the war not only through bravery and war tactics but also by scaring the English out of the war with threats of violence at home. It’s a story every Civil War history buff should know and it is told with page-turning excitement that has made Craughwell a bestselling history author.

Making the Irish American

Making the Irish American

History and Heritage of the Irish in the United States

  • Author: Marion Casey,J.J. Lee
  • Publisher: NYU Press
  • ISBN: 0814752187
  • Category: History
  • Page: 733
  • View: 6422
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"Most will find this book alone as satisfying as a plate of praties or an endearing tin-whistle tune." --Foreword Magazine"This lavish compendium looks at the Irish and America from a variety of perspectives." --USA Today"For anyone with the slightest interest in the history of Irish immigrants in America, Lee and Casey's book is a wonderful foundation on which to build a knowledge base."--Northeast Book Reviews"From the double-meaning of its title to its roster of impressive contributors, Making the Irish American is destined for the bookshelves of all readers who aim to keep up on Irish-American history." --Irish America"For the astute editorial selection of the number of general and somewhat specialized articles, expertise of the authors, and documentation in articles and appendices plus notes and biographies, Making the Irish American is a major text tying together this field of ethnic studies with American history and social history."--Midwest Book ReviewIrish America- a land of pubs, politics, music, stories and St. Patricks Day. But of course, it's also so much more....Making the Irish American is one of the most comprehensive books of its kind."--NYU Today"In Making the Irish American, editors J.J. Lee and Marion R. Casey have compiled an illustrated 700-page volume that traces the history of the Irish in the United States and shows the impact America has had on its Irish immigrants and vice versa. The book's 29 articles deal with various aspects of Irish-American life, including labor and unions, discrimination, politics, sports, entertainment and nationalism, as well as the future of Irish America. Among the contributors are Calvin Trillin, Pete Hamill, Daniel Patrick Moynihanand the editors." --Associated Press"This massive volume, copublish

How the Irish Saved Civilization

How the Irish Saved Civilization

  • Author: Thomas Cahill
  • Publisher: Anchor
  • ISBN: 9780307755131
  • Category: History
  • Page: 256
  • View: 1636
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The perfect St. Patrick's Day gift, and a book in the best tradition of popular history -- the untold story of Ireland's role in maintaining Western culture while the Dark Ages settled on Europe. Every year millions of Americans celebrate St. Patrick's Day, but they may not be aware of how great an influence St. Patrick was on the subsequent history of civilization. Not only did he bring Christianity to Ireland, he instilled a sense of literacy and learning that would create the conditions that allowed Ireland to become "the isle of saints and scholars" -- and thus preserve Western culture while Europe was being overrun by barbarians. In this entertaining and compelling narrative, Thomas Cahill tells the story of how Europe evolved from the classical age of Rome to the medieval era. Without Ireland, the transition could not have taken place. Not only did Irish monks and scribes maintain the very record of Western civilization -- copying manuscripts of Greek and Latin writers, both pagan and Christian, while libraries and learning on the continent were forever lost -- they brought their uniquely Irish world-view to the task. As Cahill delightfully illustrates, so much of the liveliness we associate with medieval culture has its roots in Ireland. When the seeds of culture were replanted on the European continent, it was from Ireland that they were germinated. In the tradition of Barbara Tuchman's A Distant Mirror, How The Irish Saved Civilization reconstructs an era that few know about but which is central to understanding our past and our cultural heritage. But it conveys its knowledge with a winking wit that aptly captures the sensibility of the unsung Irish who relaunched civilization. BONUS MATERIAL: This ebook edition includes an excerpt from Thomas Cahill's Heretics and Heroes.

The Celtic Way of Seeing

The Celtic Way of Seeing

Meditations on the Irish Spirit Wheel

  • Author: Frank MacEowen
  • Publisher: New World Library
  • ISBN: 9781577317845
  • Category: Self-Help
  • Page: 160
  • View: 5209
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The Celtic Way of Seeing posits a direct link between the eye and the heart, a link that connects seekers to forces, energies, and knowledge that exist beyond the corporeal world. This book explores this concept through retelling the traditional story “The Settling of the Manor of Tara,” which describes the spiritual divisions of Ireland and the four directions — north, south, east, and west. The orientations to the four directions and the center become the focal point of a series of simple meditations that guide readers to “see” the directions, making the Irish Spirit Wheel come alive in their daily lives.

Irish America

Irish America

Coming Into Clover

  • Author: Maureen Dezell
  • Publisher: Anchor Books
  • ISBN: 038549596X
  • Category: Social Science
  • Page: 272
  • View: 6771
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Explores the contributions of Irish Americans to the fabric of American life, tracing their influence on art, commerce, politics, culture, and social traditions, and discusses the role of the Catholic Church in Irish American life.

Wars of the Irish Kings

Wars of the Irish Kings

A Thousand Years of Struggle, from the Age of Myth through the Reign of Queen Elizabeth I

  • Author: David W. McCullough
  • Publisher: Broadway Books
  • ISBN: 9780307434739
  • Category: History
  • Page: 384
  • View: 1551
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For the first thousand years of its history, Ireland was shaped by its monasteries and its wars. The artistic flourishing of the monasteries has received a good deal of attention, but the violent and varied wars have in recent years gone unremembered. In Wars of the Irish Kings, David Willis McCullough has turned back to the earliest accounts of these struggles to present a rich tapestry of Ireland's fight for its identity. Beginning with the legends of ancient wars and warriors, moving through a time when history and storytelling were not separate crafts, into a time when history was as much propaganda as fact, Wars of the Irish Kings tells of tribal battles, foreign invasions, Viking raids, family feuds, wars between rival Irish kingdoms, and wars of rebellion against the English. This collection is peopled with familiar names: Cuchulain, Finn MacCool, Brian Boru, Mad King Sweeney, Strongbow, Edward and Robert Bruce, Queen Elizabeth I and Lord Essex, Hugh O'Donnell, and Hugh O'Neill. Battles formed the legends and history of the land: the Da Dannan meet the Fir Bolgs near Sligo, Brian Boru faces the Vikings at Clontarf in Dublin Bay, High King Rory O'Connor confronts the English invaders near Waterford, O'Briens battle the English (and other O'Briens) at Dysert O'Dea near Limerick, guns are carried for the first time in battle at Knockdoe near Galway, the Bruces from Scotland and their Irish allies overwhelm the English at Connor in Ulster, and Hugh O'Neill ambushes General Bagenal near Armagh. The book ends near Cork in 1601 when the English defeat O'Neill and his Spanish allies at Kinsale. Common people as well as kings appear in these pages. A foot soldier in the early days of gunpowder accidentally sets off a disastrous explosion, a harper's disembodied head is sent by error to the king of England, who displays it as that of the king of Ireland, and a Welsh camp follower named Alice is given the job of executing Irish captives during the English invasion. The sources for these stories and many more range from ancient manuscripts telling of mythical battles to a seventeenth-century siege diary. There are excerpts from such Irish literary masterpieces as The Cattle Raid of Cooley (The Tain), the monumental Annals of the Four Masters, passages from Gerald of Wales's account of the English conquest in the twelfth century, pages from an Icelandic saga, and even a blistering letter from Queen Elizabeth I to her inept commander in Ireland ("You do but piece up a hollow peace . . . "). The result is a surprisingly immediate and stunning portrait of an all-but-forgotten time that forged the Ireland to come. From the Hardcover edition.

The Way It Was

The Way It Was

  • Author: Malachy Donoghue
  • Publisher: N.A
  • ISBN: 9781718750708
  • Category:
  • Page: 178
  • View: 5133
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Malachy was a man with a handshake that would make a grown man cry and a body like Groundskeeper Willie from the Simpsons at age 89. He loved his family, his dogs and his home. We miss him and think about him everyday. He would be honored to know that his book is getting rave reviews and a great deal of international media coverage.

The Humanities and the Irish University

The Humanities and the Irish University

Anomalies and Opportunities

  • Author: Michael O'Sullivan
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press
  • ISBN: 1784995223
  • Category: Education
  • Page: 224
  • View: 3688
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This is the first book-length study of the humanities and the Irish university. Ireland was a deeply religious country throughout the twentieth century but the colleges of its National University never established a religion or theology department. The official first language of Ireland is Irish but the vast majority of teaching in the arts and humanities is in English. These are two of the anomalies that long constrained humanities education in Ireland. This book charts a history of responses to humanities education in the Irish context. Reading the work of John Henry Newman, Padraig Pearse, Sean O Tuama, Denis Donoghue, Declan Kiberd, Richard Kearney and others, it looks for an Irish humanities ethos. It compares humanities models in the US, France and Asia with those in Ireland in light of work by Immanuel Kant, Pierre Bourdieu and Jacques Derrida. It should appeal to those interested in Irish education and history.

The Irish Voice in America

The Irish Voice in America

250 Years of Irish-American Fiction

  • Author: Charles Fanning
  • Publisher: University Press of Kentucky
  • ISBN: 0813148332
  • Category: Literary Criticism
  • Page: 448
  • View: 1079
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In this study, Charles Fanning has written the first general account of the origins and development of a literary tradition among American writers of Irish birth or background who have explored the Irish immigrant or ethnic experience in works of fiction. The result is a portrait of the evolving fictional self-consciousness of an immigrant group over a span of 250 years. Fanning traces the roots of Irish-American writing back to the eighteenth century and carries it forward through the traumatic years of the Famine to the present time with an intensely productive period in the twentieth century beginning with James T. Farrell. Later writers treated in depth include Edwin O'Connor, Elizabeth Cullinan, Maureen Howard, and William Kennedy. Along the way he places in the historical record many all but forgotten writers, including the prolific Mary Ann Sadlier. The Irish Voice in America is not only a highly readable contribution to American literary history but also a valuable reference to many writers and their works. For this second edition, Fanning has added a chapter that covers the fiction of the past decade. He argues that contemporary writers continue to draw on Ireland as a source and are important chroniclers of the modern American experience.

Motherfocloir

Motherfocloir

Dispatches from a not so dead language

  • Author: Darach O'Séaghdha
  • Publisher: Head of Zeus Ltd
  • ISBN: 178669185X
  • Category: Language Arts & Disciplines
  • Page: 240
  • View: 2358
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'Motherfoclóir' [focloir means 'dictionary' and is pronounced like a rather more vulgar English epithet] is a book based on the popular Twitter account @theirishfor. As the title suggests, 'Motherfoclóir' takes an irreverent, pun-friendly and contemporary approach to the Irish language. The translations are expanded on and arranged into broad categories that allow interesting connections to be made, and sprinkled with anecdotes and observations about Irish and Ireland itself, as well as language in general. The author includes stories about his own relationship with Irish, and how it fits in with the most important events in his life. This is a book for all lovers of the quirks of language.

The Day That Went Missing

The Day That Went Missing

A Family's Story

  • Author: Richard Beard
  • Publisher: Little, Brown
  • ISBN: 0316418463
  • Category: Biography & Autobiography
  • Page: 288
  • View: 5663
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"Spellbinding, terrifying, deeply moving, Richard Beard's The Day That Went Missing is a masterpiece" (Joanna Rakoff), an unflinching portrait of a family's silent grief, and the tragic death of his brother not spoken about for forty years. Winner of the PEN/Ackerley Prize 2018 On a family summer holiday in Cornwall in 1978, Richard and his younger brother Nicholas are jumping in the waves. Suddenly, Nicholas is out of his depth. One moment he's there, the next he's gone. Richard and his other brothers don't attend the funeral, and incredibly the family returns immediately to the same cottage - to complete the holiday, to carry on, in the best British tradition. They soon stop speaking of the catastrophe. Their epic act of collective denial writes Nicky out of the family memory. Nearly forty years later, Richard, an acclaimed novelist, is haunted by the missing piece of his childhood, the unexpressed and unacknowledged grief at his core. He doesn't even know the date of his brother's death or the name of the beach where the tragedy occurred. So he sets out on a pain-staking investigation to rebuild Nicky's life, and ultimately to recreate the precise events on the day of the accident. The Day That Went Missing is a transcendent story of guilt and forgiveness, of reckoning with unspeakable loss. But, above all, it is a brother's most tender act of remembrance, and a man's brave act of survival.