Search Results for "the-karankawa-indians-of-texas-an-ecological-study-of-cultural-tradition-and-change-texas-archaeology-ethnohistory"

The Karankawa Indians of Texas

The Karankawa Indians of Texas

An Ecological Study of Cultural Tradition and Change

  • Author: Robert A. Ricklis
  • Publisher: University of Texas Press
  • ISBN: 0292773218
  • Category: Social Science
  • Page: 236
  • View: 7824
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Popular lore has long depicted the Karankawa Indians as primitive scavengers (perhaps even cannibals) who eked out a meager subsistence from fishing, hunting and gathering on the Texas coastal plains. That caricature, according to Robert Ricklis, hides the reality of a people who were well-adapted to their environment, skillful in using its resources, and successful in maintaining their culture until the arrival of Anglo-American settlers. The Karankawa Indians of Texas is the first modern, well-researched history of the Karankawa from prehistoric times until their extinction in the nineteenth century. Blending archaeological and ethnohistorical data into a lively narrative history, Ricklis reveals the basic lifeway of the Karankawa, a seasonal pattern that took them from large coastal fishing camps in winter to small, dispersed hunting and gathering parties in summer. In a most important finding, he shows how, after initial hostilities, the Karankawa incorporated the Spanish missions into their subsistence pattern during the colonial period and coexisted peacefully with Euroamericans until the arrival of Anglo settlers in the 1820s and 1830s. These findings will be of wide interest to everyone studying the interactions of Native American and European peoples.

The Karankawa Indians, the Coast People of Texas

The Karankawa Indians, the Coast People of Texas

  • Author: Albert Samuel Gatschet
  • Publisher: N.A
  • ISBN: N.A
  • Category: Indians of North America
  • Page: 103
  • View: 2548
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The Toyah Phase of Central Texas

The Toyah Phase of Central Texas

Late Prehistoric Economic and Social Processes

  • Author: Nancy Adele Kenmotsu,Douglas K. Boyd
  • Publisher: Texas A&M University Press
  • ISBN: 1603446907
  • Category: Social Science
  • Page: 272
  • View: 1525
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In the fourteenth century, a culture arose in and around the Edwards Plateau of Central Texas that represents the last prehistoric peoples before the cultural upheaval introduced by European explorers. This culture has been labeled the Toyah phase, characterized by a distinctive tool kit and a bone-tempered pottery tradition. ?Spanish documents, some translated decades ago, offer glimpses of these mobile people. Archaeological excavations, some quite recent, offer other views of this culture, whose homeland covered much of Central and South Texas. For the first time in a single volume, this book brings together a number of perspectives and interpretations of these hunter-gatherers and how they interacted with each other, the pueblos in southeastern New Mexico, the mobile groups in northern Mexico, and newcomers from the northern plains such as the Apache and Comanche.? Assembling eight studies and interpretive essays to look at social boundaries from the perspective of migration, hunter-farmer interactions, subsistence, and other issues significant to anthropologists and archaeologists, The Toyah Phase of Central Texas: Late Prehistoric Economic and Social Processes demonstrates that these prehistoric societies were never isolated from the world around them. Rather, these societies were keenly aware of changes happening on the plains to their north, among the Caddoan groups east of them, in the Puebloan groups in what is now New Mexico, and among their neighbors to the south in Mexico.

Peace Came in the Form of a Woman

Peace Came in the Form of a Woman

Indians and Spaniards in the Texas Borderlands

  • Author: Juliana Barr
  • Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press
  • ISBN: 9780807867730
  • Category: History
  • Page: 416
  • View: 7424
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Revising the standard narrative of European-Indian relations in America, Juliana Barr reconstructs a world in which Indians were the dominant power and Europeans were the ones forced to accommodate, resist, and persevere. She demonstrates that between the 1690s and 1780s, Indian peoples including Caddos, Apaches, Payayas, Karankawas, Wichitas, and Comanches formed relationships with Spaniards in Texas that refuted European claims of imperial control. Barr argues that Indians not only retained control over their territories but also imposed control over Spaniards. Instead of being defined in racial terms, as was often the case with European constructions of power, diplomatic relations between the Indians and Spaniards in the region were dictated by Indian expressions of power, grounded in gendered terms of kinship. By examining six realms of encounter--first contact, settlement and intermarriage, mission life, warfare, diplomacy, and captivity--Barr shows that native categories of gender provided the political structure of Indian-Spanish relations by defining people's identity, status, and obligations vis-a-vis others. Because native systems of kin-based social and political order predominated, argues Barr, Indian concepts of gender cut across European perceptions of racial difference.

The Prehistory of Texas

The Prehistory of Texas

  • Author: Timothy K. Perttula
  • Publisher: Texas A&M University Press
  • ISBN: 9781585441945
  • Category: Social Science
  • Page: 471
  • View: 4020
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This comprehensive volume explores in detail the varied experience of native peoples who lived on this land in prehistoric times. Chapters on each of the regions offer cutting-edge research, the culmination of years of work by dozens of the most knowledgeable experts.

Historic Native Peoples of Texas

Historic Native Peoples of Texas

  • Author: William C. Foster
  • Publisher: University of Texas Press
  • ISBN: 0292781911
  • Category: Social Science
  • Page: 366
  • View: 8440
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Several hundred tribes of Native Americans were living within or hunting and trading across the present-day borders of Texas when Cabeza de Vaca and his shipwrecked companions washed up on a Gulf Coast beach in 1528. Over the next two centuries, as Spanish and French expeditions explored the state, they recorded detailed information about the locations and lifeways of Texas's Native peoples. Using recent translations of these expedition diaries and journals, along with discoveries from ongoing archaeological investigations, William C. Foster here assembles the most complete account ever published of Texas's Native peoples during the early historic period (AD 1528 to 1722). Foster describes the historic Native peoples of Texas by geographic regions. His chronological narrative records the interactions of Native groups with European explorers and with Native trading partners across a wide network that extended into Louisiana, the Great Plains, New Mexico, and northern Mexico. Foster provides extensive ethnohistorical information about Texas's Native peoples, as well as data on the various regions' animals, plants, and climate. Accompanying each regional account is an annotated list of named Indian tribes in that region and maps that show tribal territories and European expedition routes. This authoritative overview of Texas's historic Native peoples reveals that these groups were far more cosmopolitan than previously known. Functioning as the central link in the continent-wide circulation of trade goods and cultural elements such as religion, architecture, and lithic technology, Texas's historic Native peoples played a crucial role in connecting the Native peoples of North America from the Pacific Coast to the Southeast woodlands.

The "seductions" of Texas

The

the political language of gender in the conquest of Texas, 1690-1803

  • Author: Juliana Barr
  • Publisher: N.A
  • ISBN: N.A
  • Category:
  • Page: 902
  • View: 6444
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The Karankawa of Texas

The Karankawa of Texas

  • Author: Greg Roza
  • Publisher: The Rosen Publishing Group
  • ISBN: 9781404228702
  • Category: History
  • Page: 64
  • View: 2088
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Discusses the origins, social structure, spiritual beliefs, and daily life of the Karankawa, with an emphasis on who they were and why the tribe is now extinct.

Method and Theory in American Archaeology

Method and Theory in American Archaeology

  • Author: Gordon Willey,Philip Phillips
  • Publisher: University of Alabama Press
  • ISBN: 0817310886
  • Category: History
  • Page: 347
  • View: 4557
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A Dan Josselyn Memorial Publication This invaluable classic provides the framework for the development of American archaeology during the last half of the 20th century. In 1958 Gordon R. Willey and Philip Phillips first published Method and Theory in American Archaeology— a volume that went through five printings, the last in 1967 at the height of what became known as the new, or processual, archaeology. The advent of processual archaeology, according to Willey and Phillips, represented a "theoretical debate . . . a question of whether archaeology should be the study of cultural history or the study of cultural process." Willey and Phillips suggested that little interpretation had taken place in American archaeology, and their book offered an analytical perspective; the methods they described and the structural framework they used for synthesizing American prehistory were all geared toward interpretation. Method and Theory served as the catalyst and primary reader on the topic for over a decade. This facsimile reprint edition of the original University of Chicago Press volume includes a new foreword by Gordon R. Willey, which outlines the state of American archaeology at the time of the original publication, and a new introduction by the editors to place the book in historical context. The bibliography is exhaustive. Academic libraries, students, professionals, and knowledgeable amateurs will welcome this new edition of a standard-maker among texts on American archaeology.

Bulletin of the Texas Archeological Society

Bulletin of the Texas Archeological Society

  • Author: N.A
  • Publisher: N.A
  • ISBN: N.A
  • Category: Indians
  • Page: N.A
  • View: 9908
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Recovering History, Constructing Race

Recovering History, Constructing Race

The Indian, Black, and White Roots of Mexican Americans

  • Author: Martha Menchaca
  • Publisher: University of Texas Press
  • ISBN: 0292778481
  • Category: Social Science
  • Page: 392
  • View: 6676
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The history of Mexican Americans is a history of the intermingling of races—Indian, White, and Black. This racial history underlies a legacy of racial discrimination against Mexican Americans and their Mexican ancestors that stretches from the Spanish conquest to current battles over ending affirmative action and other assistance programs for ethnic minorities. Asserting the centrality of race in Mexican American history, Martha Menchaca here offers the first interpretive racial history of Mexican Americans, focusing on racial foundations and race relations from prehispanic times to the present. Menchaca uses the concept of racialization to describe the process through which Spanish, Mexican, and U.S. authorities constructed racial status hierarchies that marginalized Mexicans of color and restricted their rights of land ownership. She traces this process from the Spanish colonial period and the introduction of slavery through racial laws affecting Mexican Americans into the late twentieth-century. This re-viewing of familiar history through the lens of race recovers Blacks as important historical actors, links Indians and the mission system in the Southwest to the Mexican American present, and reveals the legal and illegal means by which Mexican Americans lost their land grants.

Native North American Armor, Shields, and Fortifications

Native North American Armor, Shields, and Fortifications

  • Author: David E. Jones
  • Publisher: University of Texas Press
  • ISBN: 0292779704
  • Category: Social Science
  • Page: 206
  • View: 8389
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From the Chickasaw fighting the Choctaw in the Southeast to the Sioux battling the Cheyenne on the Great Plains, warfare was endemic among the North American Indians when Europeans first arrived on this continent. An impressive array of offensive weaponry and battle tactics gave rise to an equally impressive range of defensive technology. Native Americans constructed very effective armor and shields using wood, bone, and leather. Their fortifications ranged from simple refuges to walled and moated stockades to multiple stockades linked in strategic defensive networks. In this book, David E. Jones offers the first systematic comparative study of the defensive armor and fortifications of aboriginal Native Americans. Drawing data from ethnohistorical accounts and archaeological evidence, he surveys the use of armor, shields, and fortifications both before European contact and during the historic period by American Indians from the Southeast to the Northwest Coast, from the Northeast Woodlands to the desert Southwest, and from the Sub-Arctic to the Great Plains. Jones also demonstrates the sociocultural factors that affected warfare and shaped the development of different types of armor and fortifications. Extensive eyewitness descriptions of warfare, armor, and fortifications, as well as photos and sketches of Indian armor from museum collections, add a visual dimension to the text.

We Came Naked and Barefoot

We Came Naked and Barefoot

The Journey of Cabeza de Vaca across North America

  • Author: Alex D. Krieger
  • Publisher: University of Texas Press
  • ISBN: 0292779895
  • Category: History
  • Page: 336
  • View: 2425
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Perhaps no one has ever been such a survivor as álvar Núñez Cabeza de Vaca. Member of a 600-man expedition sent out from Spain to colonize "La Florida" in 1527, he survived a failed exploration of the west coast of Florida, an open-boat crossing of the Gulf of Mexico, shipwreck on the Texas coast, six years of captivity among native peoples, and an arduous, overland journey in which he and the three other remaining survivors of the original expedition walked some 1,500 miles from the central Texas coast to the Gulf of California, then another 1,300 miles to Mexico City. The story of Cabeza de Vaca has been told many times, beginning with his own account, Relación de los naufragios, which was included and amplified in Gonzalo Fernando de Oviedo y Váldez's Historia general de las Indias. Yet the route taken by Cabeza de Vaca and his companions remains the subject of enduring controversy. In this book, Alex D. Krieger correlates the accounts in these two primary sources with his own extensive knowledge of the geography, archaeology, and anthropology of southern Texas and northern Mexico to plot out stage by stage the most probable route of the 2,800-mile journey of Cabeza de Vaca. This book consists of several parts, foremost of which is the original English version of Alex Krieger's dissertation (edited by Margery Krieger), in which he traces the route of Cabeza de Vaca and his companions from the coast of Texas to Spanish settlements in western Mexico. This document is rich in information about the native groups, vegetation, geography, and material culture that the companions encountered. Thomas R. Hester's foreword and afterword set the 1955 dissertation in the context of more recent scholarship and archaeological discoveries, some of which have supported Krieger's plot of the journey. Margery Krieger's preface explains how she prepared her late husband's work for publication. Alex Krieger's original translations of the Cabeza de Vaca and Oviedo accounts round out the volume.

One Vast Winter Count

One Vast Winter Count

The Native American West Before Lewis and Clark

  • Author: Colin G. Calloway
  • Publisher: U of Nebraska Press
  • ISBN: 9780803264656
  • Category: History
  • Page: 631
  • View: 6124
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A professor of history offers a sweeping new history of the Native American West from the earliest arrival of ancient peoples to the early nineteenth century, before the Lewis and Clarke expedition opened it to exploration, focusing particular attention on the period of conflict that preceded this period. Reprint.

Revista de arqueología americana

Revista de arqueología americana

  • Author: N.A
  • Publisher: N.A
  • ISBN: N.A
  • Category: America
  • Page: N.A
  • View: 6111
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Subject Guide to Books in Print

Subject Guide to Books in Print

An Index to the Publishers' Trade List Annual

  • Author: N.A
  • Publisher: N.A
  • ISBN: N.A
  • Category: American literature
  • Page: N.A
  • View: 6350
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Spanish Texas, 1519–1821

Spanish Texas, 1519–1821

Revised Edition

  • Author: Donald E. Chipman,Harriett Denise Joseph
  • Publisher: University of Texas Press
  • ISBN: 0292782632
  • Category: History
  • Page: 388
  • View: 3060
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Modern Texas, like Mexico, traces its beginning to sixteenth-century encounters between Europeans and Indians who contested control over a vast land. Unlike Mexico, however, Texas eventually received the stamp of Anglo-American culture, so that Spanish contributions to present-day Texas tend to be obscured or even unknown. The first edition of Spanish Texas, 1519–1821 (1992) sought to emphasize the significance of the Spanish period in Texas history. Beginning with information on the land and its inhabitants before the arrival of Europeans, the original volume covered major people and events from early exploration to the end of the colonial era. This new edition of Spanish Texas has been extensively revised and expanded to include a wealth of discoveries about Texas history since 1990. The opening chapter on Texas Indians reveals their high degree of independence from European influence and extended control over their own lives. Other chapters incorporate new information on La Salle's Garcitas Creek colony and French influences in Texas, the destruction of the San Sabá mission and the Spanish punitive expedition to the Red River in the late 1750s, and eighteenth-century Bourbon reforms in the Americas. Drawing on their own and others' research, the authors also provide more inclusive coverage of the role of women of various ethnicities in Spanish Texas and of the legal rights of women on the Texas frontier, demonstrating that whether European or Indian, elite or commoner, slave owner or slave, women enjoyed legal protections not heretofore fully appreciated.

Books in Print

Books in Print

  • Author: N.A
  • Publisher: N.A
  • ISBN: N.A
  • Category: American literature
  • Page: N.A
  • View: 5309
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Books in print is the major source of information on books currently published and in print in the United States. The database provides the record of forthcoming books, books in-print, and books out-of-print.

The Formation and Future of the Upper Texas Coast

The Formation and Future of the Upper Texas Coast

A Geologist Answers Questions about Sand, Storms, and Living by the Sea

  • Author: John B. Anderson
  • Publisher: Texas A&M University Press
  • ISBN: 9781585445615
  • Category: Business & Economics
  • Page: 163
  • View: 5668
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With strong personal and professional ties to the Gulf of Mexico, marine geologist John B. Anderson has spent two decades studying the Texas coastline and continental shelf. In this book, he sets out to answer fundamental questions that are frequently asked about the coast—how it evolved; how it operates; how natural processes affect it and why it is ever changing; and, finally, how human development can be managed to help preserve it. The book provides an amply illustrated look at ocean waves and currents, beach formation and erosion, barrier island evolution, hurricanes, and sea level changes. With an abundance of visual material—including aerial photos, historical maps, simple figures, and satellite images—the author presents a lively, interesting lesson in coastal geography that readers will remember and appreciate the next time they are at the beach and want to know: What happens to the sand that erodes from our beaches? Can beach erosion be stopped—and should we try? How much sand will be needed to stabilize our beaches? Does a hurricane have any positive impacts? How much development can the coast withstand? This entertaining and instructive book provides authoritative answers to these and other questions that are essential to our understanding of coastal change.