Search Results for "the-last-colonial-massacre"

The Last Colonial Massacre

The Last Colonial Massacre

Latin America in the Cold War, Updated Edition

  • Author: Greg Grandin,Naomi Klein
  • Publisher: University of Chicago Press
  • ISBN: 0226306909
  • Category: History
  • Page: 319
  • View: 1888
DOWNLOAD NOW »
After decades of bloodshed and political terror, many lament the rise of the left in Latin America. Since the triumph of Castro, politicians and historians have accused the left there of rejecting democracy, embracing communist totalitarianism, and prompting both revolutionary violence and a right-wing backlash. Through unprecedented archival research and gripping personal testimonies, Greg Grandin powerfully challenges these views in this classic work. In doing so, he uncovers the hidden history of the Latin American Cold War: of hidebound reactionaries holding on to their power and privilege; of Mayan Marxists blending indigenous notions of justice with universal ideas of equality; and of a United States supporting new styles of state terror throughout the region. With Guatemala as his case study, Grandin argues that the Latin American Cold War was a struggle not between political liberalism and Soviet communism but two visions of democracy—one vibrant and egalitarian, the other tepid and unequal—and that the conflict’s main effect was to eliminate homegrown notions of social democracy. Updated with a new preface by the author and an interview with Naomi Klein, The Last Colonial Massacre is history of the highest order—a work that will dramatically recast our understanding of Latin American politics and the role of the United States in the Cold War and beyond. “This work admirably explains the process in which hopes of democracy were brutally repressed in Guatemala and its people experienced a civil war lasting for half a century.”—International History Review “A richly detailed, humane, and passionately subversive portrait of inspiring reformers tragically redefined by the Cold War as enemies of the state.”—Journal of American History

In from the Cold

In from the Cold

Latin America’s New Encounter with the Cold War

  • Author: Gilbert M. Joseph,Daniela Spenser
  • Publisher: Duke University Press
  • ISBN: 9780822341215
  • Category: History
  • Page: 439
  • View: 4385
DOWNLOAD NOW »
DIVReexamines the Cold War in Latin America by shifting the focus away from superpower decision-making and exploring the many ways in which Latin American leaders and ordinary people used, manipulated, shaped, and were victimized by the Cold War./div

Teaching Recent Global History

Teaching Recent Global History

Dialogues Among Historians, Social Studies Teachers and Students

  • Author: Diana B. Turk,Laura J. Dull,Robert Cohen,Michael R. Stoll
  • Publisher: Routledge
  • ISBN: 1136638350
  • Category: Education
  • Page: 264
  • View: 966
DOWNLOAD NOW »
Teaching Recent Global History explores innovative ways to teach world history, beginning with the early 20th century. The authors’ unique approach unites historians, social studies teachers, and educational curriculum specialists to offer historically rich, pedagogically innovative, and academically rigorous lessons that help students connect with and deeply understand key events and trends in recent global history. Highlighting the best scholarship for each major continent, the text explores the ways that this scholarship can be adapted by teachers in the classroom in order to engage and inspire students. Each of the eight main chapters highlights a particularly important event or theme, which is then complemented by a detailed discussion of a particular methodological approach. Key features include: • An overarching narrative that helps readers address historical arguments; • Relevant primary documents or artifacts, plus a discussion of a particular historical method well-suited to teaching about them; • Lesson plans suitable for both middle and secondary level classrooms; • Document-based questions and short bibliographies for further research on the topic. This invaluable book is ideal for any aspiring or current teacher who wants to think critically about how to teach world history and make historical discussions come alive for students.

The Reactionary Mind

The Reactionary Mind

Conservatism from Edmund Burke to Sarah Palin

  • Author: Corey Robin
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press
  • ISBN: 0199911886
  • Category: Political Science
  • Page: 304
  • View: 1451
DOWNLOAD NOW »
Late in life, William F. Buckley made a confession to Corey Robin. Capitalism is "boring," said the founding father of the American right. "Devoting your life to it," as conservatives do, "is horrifying if only because it's so repetitious. It's like sex." With this unlikely conversation began Robin's decade-long foray into the conservative mind. What is conservatism, and what's truly at stake for its proponents? If capitalism bores them, what excites them? Tracing conservatism back to its roots in the reaction against the French Revolution, Robin argues that the right is fundamentally inspired by a hostility to emancipating the lower orders. Some conservatives endorse the free market, others oppose it. Some criticize the state, others celebrate it. Underlying these differences is the impulse to defend power and privilege against movements demanding freedom and equality. Despite their opposition to these movements, conservatives favor a dynamic conception of politics and society--one that involves self-transformation, violence, and war. They are also highly adaptive to new challenges and circumstances. This partiality to violence and capacity for reinvention has been critical to their success. Written by a keen, highly regarded observer of the contemporary political scene, The Reactionary Mind ranges widely, from Edmund Burke to Antonin Scalia, from John C. Calhoun to Ayn Rand. It advances the notion that all rightwing ideologies, from the eighteenth century through today, are historical improvisations on a theme: the felt experience of having power, seeing it threatened, and trying to win it back.

Hearts and Minds

Hearts and Minds

A People's History of Counterinsurgency

  • Author: Hannah Gurman
  • Publisher: The New Press
  • ISBN: 1595588434
  • Category: History
  • Page: 304
  • View: 2601
DOWNLOAD NOW »
The first book of its kind, Hearts and Minds is a scathing response to the grand narrative of U.S. counterinsurgency, in which warfare is defined not by military might alone but by winning the "hearts and minds" of civilians. Dormant as a tactic since the days of the Vietnam War, in 2006 the U.S. Army drafted a new field manual heralding the resurrection of counterinsurgency as a primary military engagement strategy; counterinsurgency campaigns followed in Iraq and Afghanistan, despite the fact that counterinsurgency had utterly failed to account for the actual lived experiences of the people whose hearts and minds America had sought to win. Drawing on leading thinkers in the field and using key examples from Malaya, the Philippines, Vietnam, El Salvador, Iraq, and Afghanistan, Hearts and Minds brings a long-overdue focus on the many civilians caught up in these conflicts. Both urgent and timely, this important book challenges the idea of a neat divide between insurgents and the populations from which they emerge—and should be required reading for anyone engaged in the most important contemporary debates over U.S. military policy.

Who Is Rigoberta Menchu?

Who Is Rigoberta Menchu?

  • Author: Greg Grandin
  • Publisher: Verso Books
  • ISBN: 1844678504
  • Category: History
  • Page: 176
  • View: 3725
DOWNLOAD NOW »
In 1984, indigenous rights activist Rigoberta Menchú published a harrowing account of life under a military dictatorship in Guatemala. That autobiography—I, Rigoberta Menchú—transformed the study and understanding of modern Guatemalan history and brought its author international renown. She won a Nobel Peace Prize in 1992. At that point, she became the target of historians seeking to discredit her testimony and deny US complicity in the genocidal policies of the Guatemalan regime. Told here is the story of an unlettered woman who became the spokesperson for her people and clashed with the intellectual apologists of the world’s most powerful nation. What happened to her autobiography speaks volumes about power, perception and race on the world stage. This critical companion to Menchú’s work will disabuse many readers of the lies that have been told about this courageous individual.

Truth recovery in Northern Ireland

Truth recovery in Northern Ireland

Critically interpreting the past

  • Author: Kirk Simpson
  • Publisher: Manchester University Press
  • ISBN: 1847797288
  • Category: Political Science
  • Page: 176
  • View: 4218
DOWNLOAD NOW »
Northern Ireland has entered what is arguably the key phase in its troubled political history - truth recovery and dealing with the legacy of the past - yet the void in knowledge and the lack of academic literature with regard to victims' rights is particularly striking. This book analyses truth recovery as a fundamental aspect of the transition from political violence to peace, democracy and stability in post-conflict Northern Ireland. Kirk Simpson argues that it is essential for any process of truth recovery in Northern Ireland to provide the victims of political violence with the opportunity to express and articulate their narratives of suffering within the context of public dialogic processes. He outlines a unique and original model: that victims of political violence should be enabled to engage in meaningful truth recovery through a Habermasian process of public democratic deliberation and communication involving direct dialogue with the perpetrators of such violence. This process of 'communicative justice' is framed within Habermas' theory of communicative action and can help to ensure that legitimate truth recovery publicly acknowledges the trauma of victims and subjects perpetrator narratives of political violence to critical scrutiny and rational deconstruction. Crucially, the book aims to contribute to the empowerment of victims in Northern Ireland by stimulating constructive discussion and awareness of hitherto silenced narratives of the conflict. This difficult and unsettling interrogation and interpretation of the conflict from a comparatively 'unknown perspective' is central to the prospects for critically examining and mastering the past in Northern Ireland.

Paper Cadavers

Paper Cadavers

The Archives of Dictatorship in Guatemala

  • Author: Kirsten Weld
  • Publisher: Duke University Press
  • ISBN: 082237658X
  • Category: History
  • Page: 352
  • View: 9217
DOWNLOAD NOW »
In Paper Cadavers, an inside account of the astonishing discovery and rescue of Guatemala's secret police archives, Kirsten Weld probes the politics of memory, the wages of the Cold War, and the stakes of historical knowledge production. After Guatemala's bloody thirty-six years of civil war (1960–1996), silence and impunity reigned. That is, until 2005, when human rights investigators stumbled on the archives of the country's National Police, which, at 75 million pages, proved to be the largest trove of secret state records ever found in Latin America. The unearthing of the archives renewed fierce debates about history, memory, and justice. In Paper Cadavers, Weld explores Guatemala's struggles to manage this avalanche of evidence of past war crimes, providing a firsthand look at how postwar justice activists worked to reconfigure terror archives into implements of social change. Tracing the history of the police files as they were transformed from weapons of counterinsurgency into tools for post-conflict reckoning, Weld sheds light on the country's fraught transition from war to an uneasy peace, reflecting on how societies forget and remember political violence.

The Brothers: John Foster Dulles, Allen Dulles, and Their Secret World War

The Brothers: John Foster Dulles, Allen Dulles, and Their Secret World War

  • Author: Stephen Kinzer
  • Publisher: Macmillan
  • ISBN: 1429953527
  • Category: History
  • Page: 416
  • View: 7866
DOWNLOAD NOW »
A joint biography of John Foster Dulles and Allen Dulles, who led the United States into an unseen war that decisively shaped today's world During the 1950s, when the Cold War was at its peak, two immensely powerful brothers led the United States into a series of foreign adventures whose effects are still shaking the world. John Foster Dulles was secretary of state while his brother, Allen Dulles, was director of the Central Intelligence Agency. In this book, Stephen Kinzer places their extraordinary lives against the background of American culture and history. He uses the framework of biography to ask: Why does the United States behave as it does in the world? The Brothers explores hidden forces that shape the national psyche, from religious piety to Western movies—many of which are about a noble gunman who cleans up a lawless town by killing bad guys. This is how the Dulles brothers saw themselves, and how many Americans still see their country's role in the world. Propelled by a quintessentially American set of fears and delusions, the Dulles brothers launched violent campaigns against foreign leaders they saw as threats to the United States. These campaigns helped push countries from Guatemala to the Congo into long spirals of violence, led the United States into the Vietnam War, and laid the foundation for decades of hostility between the United States and countries from Cuba to Iran. The story of the Dulles brothers is the story of America. It illuminates and helps explain the modern history of the United States and the world. A Kirkus Reviews Best Nonfiction Book of 2013

Fordlandia

Fordlandia

The Rise and Fall of Henry Ford's Forgotten Jungle City

  • Author: Greg Grandin
  • Publisher: Metropolitan Books
  • ISBN: 9781429938013
  • Category: History
  • Page: 432
  • View: 6766
DOWNLOAD NOW »
The stunning, never before told story of the quixotic attempt to recreate small-town America in the heart of the Amazon In 1927, Henry Ford, the richest man in the world, bought a tract of land twice the size of Delaware in the Brazilian Amazon. His intention was to grow rubber, but the project rapidly evolved into a more ambitious bid to export America itself, along with its golf courses, ice-cream shops, bandstands, indoor plumbing, and Model Ts rolling down broad streets. Fordlandia, as the settlement was called, quickly became the site of an epic clash. On one side was the car magnate, lean, austere, the man who reduced industrial production to its simplest motions; on the other, the Amazon, lush, extravagant, the most complex ecological system on the planet. Ford's early success in imposing time clocks and square dances on the jungle soon collapsed, as indigenous workers, rejecting his midwestern Puritanism, turned the place into a ribald tropical boomtown. Fordlandia's eventual demise as a rubber plantation foreshadowed the practices that today are laying waste to the rain forest. More than a parable of one man's arrogant attempt to force his will on the natural world, Fordlandia depicts a desperate quest to salvage the bygone America that the Ford factory system did much to dispatch. As Greg Grandin shows in this gripping and mordantly observed history, Ford's great delusion was not that the Amazon could be tamed but that the forces of capitalism, once released, might yet be contained. Fordlandia is a 2009 National Book Award Finalist for Nonfiction.

The Empire of Necessity

The Empire of Necessity

Slavery, Freedom, and Deception in the New World

  • Author: Greg Grandin
  • Publisher: Metropolitan Books
  • ISBN: 1429943173
  • Category: History
  • Page: 384
  • View: 5629
DOWNLOAD NOW »
From the acclaimed author of Fordlandia, the story of a remarkable slave rebellion that illuminates America's struggle with slavery and freedom during the Age of Revolution and beyond One morning in 1805, off a remote island in the South Pacific, Captain Amasa Delano, a New England seal hunter, climbed aboard a distressed Spanish ship carrying scores of West Africans he thought were slaves. They weren't. Having earlier seized control of the vessel and slaughtered most of the crew, they were staging an elaborate ruse, acting as if they were humble servants. When Delano, an idealistic, anti-slavery republican, finally realized the deception, he responded with explosive violence. Drawing on research on four continents, The Empire of Necessity explores the multiple forces that culminated in this extraordinary event—an event that already inspired Herman Melville's masterpiece Benito Cereno. Now historian Greg Grandin, with the gripping storytelling that was praised in Fordlandia, uses the dramatic happenings of that day to map a new transnational history of slavery in the Americas, capturing the clash of peoples, economies, and faiths that was the New World in the early 1800s.

The Familiar Made Strange

The Familiar Made Strange

American Icons and Artifacts after the Transnational Turn

  • Author: Brooke L. Blower,Mark Philip Bradley
  • Publisher: Cornell University Press
  • ISBN: 0801455456
  • Category: History
  • Page: 232
  • View: 3370
DOWNLOAD NOW »
In The Familiar Made Strange, twelve distinguished historians offer original and playful readings of American icons and artifacts that cut across rather than stop at the nation’s borders to model new interpretive approaches to studying United States history. These leading practitioners of the “transnational turn” pause to consider such famous icons as John Singleton Copley’s painting Watson and the Shark, Albert Eisenstaedt’s photograph V-J Day, 1945, Times Square, and Alfred Kinsey’s reports on sexual behavior, as well as more surprising but revealing artifacts like Josephine Baker’s banana skirt and William Howard Taft’s underpants. Together, they present a road map to the varying scales, angles and methods of transnational analysis that shed light on American politics, empire, gender, and the operation of power in everyday life. Contributors: Brooke L. Blower, Boston University; Mark Philip Bradley, University of Chicago; Nick Cullather, Indiana University; Brian DeLay, University of California–Berkeley; Matthew Pratt Guterl, Brown University; Jesse Hoffnung-Garskof, University of Michigan–Ann Arbor; Fredrik Logevall, Cornell University; Mary A. Renda, Mount Holyoke College; Daniel T. Rodgers, Princeton University; Andrew J. Rotter, Colgate University; Brian Rouleau, Texas A&M University; Naoko Shibusawa, Brown University

Escaping the Fire

Escaping the Fire

How an Ixil Mayan Pastor Led His People Out of a Holocaust During the Guatemalan Civil War

  • Author: Tomás Guzaro,Terri Jacob McComb
  • Publisher: University of Texas Press
  • ISBN: 0292779208
  • Category: History
  • Page: 244
  • View: 3483
DOWNLOAD NOW »
During the height of the Guatemalan civil war, Tomás Guzaro, a Mayan evangelical pastor, led more than two hundred fellow Mayas out of guerrilla-controlled Ixil territory and into the relative safety of the government army's hands. This exodus was one of the factors that caused the guerrillas to lose their grip on the Ixil, thus hastening the return of peace to the area. In Escaping the Fire, Guzaro relates the hardships common to most Mayas and the resulting unrest that opened the door to civil war. He details the Guatemalan army's atrocities while also describing the Guerrilla Army of the Poor's rise to power in Ixil country, which resulted in limited religious freedom, murdered church leaders, and threatened congregations. His story climaxes with the harrowing vision that induced him to guide his people out of their war-torn homeland. Guzaro also provides an intimate look at his spiritual pilgrimage through all three of Guatemala's main religions. The son of a Mayan priest, formerly a leader in the Catholic Church, and finally a convert to Protestantism, Guzaro, in detailing his religious life, offers insight into the widespread shift toward Protestantism in Latin America over the past four decades. Riveting and highly personal, Escaping the Fire ultimately provides a counterpoint to the usual interpretation of indigenous agency during the Guatemalan civil war by documenting the little-studied experiences of Protestants living in guerrilla-held territory.

The Fate of Freedom Elsewhere

The Fate of Freedom Elsewhere

Human Rights and U.S. Cold War Policy toward Argentina

  • Author: William Michael Schmidli
  • Publisher: Cornell University Press
  • ISBN: 0801469619
  • Category: History
  • Page: 256
  • View: 7886
DOWNLOAD NOW »
During the first quarter-century of the Cold War, upholding human rights was rarely a priority in U.S. policy toward Latin America. Seeking to protect U.S. national security, American policymakers quietly cultivated relations with politically ambitious Latin American militaries—a strategy clearly evident in the Ford administration’s tacit support of state-sanctioned terror in Argentina following the 1976 military coup d’état. By the mid-1970s, however, the blossoming human rights movement in the United States posed a serious threat to the maintenance of close U.S. ties to anticommunist, right-wing military regimes. The competition between cold warriors and human rights advocates culminated in a fierce struggle to define U.S. policy during the Jimmy Carter presidency. In The Fate of Freedom Elsewhere, William Michael Schmidli argues that Argentina emerged as the defining test case of Carter’s promise to bring human rights to the center of his administration’s foreign policy. Entering the Oval Office at the height of the kidnapping, torture, and murder of tens of thousands of Argentines by the military government, Carter set out to dramatically shift U.S. policy from subtle support to public condemnation of human rights violation. But could the administration elicit human rights improvements in the face of a zealous military dictatorship, rising Cold War tension, and domestic political opposition? By grappling with the disparate actors engaged in the struggle over human rights, including civil rights activists, second-wave feminists, chicano/a activists, religious progressives, members of the New Right, conservative cold warriors, and business leaders, Schmidli utilizes unique interviews with U.S. and Argentine actors as well as newly declassified archives to offer a telling analysis of the rise, efficacy, and limits of human rights in shaping U.S. foreign policy in the Cold War.

2006/2007

2006/2007

A: Autoren-Index. B: Rezensenten-Index. C: Titel-Index. D: Sachgebiets-Index. E: Zeitschriften-Index / International Bibliography of Book Reviews of Scholarly Literature in the Humanities and Social Sciences / Bibliographie internationale de la littérature périodique dans les domaines des sciences humaines et Sociales

  • Author: N.A
  • Publisher: K G Saur Verlag Gmbh & Company
  • ISBN: 9783598694097
  • Category: Reference
  • Page: 2816
  • View: 3357
DOWNLOAD NOW »
The IBR, published again since 1971 as an interdisciplinary, international bibliography of reviews, offers book reviews of literature dealing primarily with the humanities and social sciences published in 6,000 mainly European scholarly journals. This unique bibliography contains over 1.1 millions book reviews. 60,000 entries are added every year with details on the work reviewed and the review.

The Journal of Military History

The Journal of Military History

  • Author: N.A
  • Publisher: N.A
  • ISBN: N.A
  • Category: United States
  • Page: N.A
  • View: 4039
DOWNLOAD NOW »

In the Shadow of Violence

In the Shadow of Violence

The Politics of Armed Groups

  • Author: Klaus Schlichte
  • Publisher: Campus Verlag
  • ISBN: N.A
  • Category: Political Science
  • Page: 255
  • View: 7286
DOWNLOAD NOW »
Spätestens seit den Anschlägen vom 11. September sind nicht-staatliche Kriegsakteure in den Mittelpunkt des wissenschaftlichen und außenpolitischen Interesses gerückt. Doch wie lassen sich ihr Handeln, ihre Strategien und ihre Organisation begreifen? Klaus Schlichte betont den politischen Charakter bewaffneter Gruppen, für den der Zusammenhang von Gewalt und Legitimität zentral ist. Damit setzt er sich von jenen Arbeiten ab, die ökonomische Interessen oder »religiösen Fundamentalismus « zur Erklärung heranziehen. Sein Vergleich von 15 Ländern zeigt, dass nicht-staatliche Gruppen immer in engen Beziehungen zu Staaten stehen und das Ziel haben, ihre Macht der Gewalt in politische Herrschaft zu transformieren.

The media were American

The media were American

U.S. mass media in decline

  • Author: Jeremy Tunstall
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
  • ISBN: N.A
  • Category: History
  • Page: 465
  • View: 5911
DOWNLOAD NOW »
It has become clear that the U.S. media are no longer increasingly their grip throughout the globe: Asia and the Arab/Moslem world is virtually saturated with their own national media output. Tunstallproduces a well-written, provocative snapshot at global media today. His point of view is relentlessly global: he considers the role of the media in the collapse of the Soviet Union, the ascendanceof the Brazillian and Mexican soap opera, the increasing strength of "Bollywood" - the national cinema output of india- as well as the relative decline in influence of US media . Importantly, Tunstall focuses on both the nation state and the geographical and cultural region as crucial levels in today's mass media. Both the United States and the US mass media have now lost their previous moral leadership. Lone American control of the world news flow has ceased. today, rather than Global media, we see a world media system comprised of inter-locking national-regional-cultural systems. Tunstall's assessment is a wake-up call for insular American media consumers.

Washington Report on the Hemisphere

Washington Report on the Hemisphere

  • Author: N.A
  • Publisher: N.A
  • ISBN: N.A
  • Category: Latin America
  • Page: N.A
  • View: 7256
DOWNLOAD NOW »

Religion and spirituality in South Africa

Religion and spirituality in South Africa

new perspectives

  • Author: Duncan Brown
  • Publisher: Univ of Natal Pr
  • ISBN: N.A
  • Category: History
  • Page: 294
  • View: 8966
DOWNLOAD NOW »
"Religion and spirituality are closely woven into the fabric of South African public and private life - though not always seamlessly or in matching thread. This book is concerned with the role of religion and spirituality in individual identity and belief, as well as in the public spheres of governance and policy-making. It brings together significant researchers from various disciplinary perspectives, ranging from law and politics to theology, literature and media studies, with the aim of investigating new critical approaches to religion and spirituality, particularly in the postcolony/South. The authors engage seriously with the challenge of accounting for the range and power of religious and spiritual discourses that run through individual and communal identification. This volume provides stimulation for further thought and work in this crucial area of South African, and postcolonial, study and life"--Cover.