Search Results for "the-new-nature-of-history-knowledge-evidence-language"

The New Nature of History

The New Nature of History

Knowledge, Evidence, Language

  • Author: Arthur Marwick
  • Publisher: Palgrave
  • ISBN: 9780333964477
  • Category: History
  • Page: 352
  • View: 3636
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This new title is a totally rewritten version of The Nature of History, first published in 1970, with revised editions in 1981, and again in 1989. Addressing the key questions of what history is, and why and how one studies it, this is a positive affirmation of the vital importance to society of the study of the past, and of the many crucial learning outcomes which accrue from historical study. There is a great deal of new material, engaging with and rebutting postmodernist criticisms of the history of the historians, and explicating more fully the author's pioneering work on how exactly historians analyze and interpret primary sources, and how they write their articles and books. This is a book for all readers interested in history, and for students and writers of history at all levels.

What is History?

What is History?

  • Author: E. H. Carr
  • Publisher: Penguin UK
  • ISBN: 0241351901
  • Category: History
  • Page: 208
  • View: 7765
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'Not only one of our most distinguished historians but also one of the most valuable contributors to historical theory' Spectator In formulating an answer to the question of 'What is History', Carr argues that the 'facts' of history are simply those which historians have chosen to focus on. All historical facts come to us as a result of interpretive choices by historians influenced by the standards of their age. Now for the first time in Penguin Modern Classics, with an introduction by Richard J. Evans, author of the Third Reich trilogy.

The Nature of History

The Nature of History

  • Author: Arthur Marwick
  • Publisher: Palgrave
  • ISBN: 9780333432358
  • Category: History
  • Page: 442
  • View: 2599
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Developed for students and general readers looking for a concise guide to the methods and purposes of historical study, this book seeks to explore the nature of historical evidence, to show how history comes to be written and to offer a basis on which "good" history can be distinguished from "bad".

British Society Since 1945

British Society Since 1945

The Penguin Social History of Britain

  • Author: Arthur Marwick
  • Publisher: Penguin UK
  • ISBN: 0141927348
  • Category: History
  • Page: 528
  • View: 3234
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High and popular culture; family, race, gender and class relations; sexual attitudes and material conditions; science and technology - the diversity of social developments in Britain from 1945 to 2002 are thoroughly explored in this new edition of aclassic text. 'Something of a tour de force... Without serious distortion or omission he moves dexterously through a wide variety of sources, ranging from poetry through film and novels to opinion polls.. it is astonishing how much he gets in' Times Educational Supplement 'An enjoyable, readable, usable achievement which leads the field' John Vincent, Sunday Times

Memory, History, Forgetting

Memory, History, Forgetting

  • Author: Paul Ricoeur
  • Publisher: University of Chicago Press
  • ISBN: 0226713466
  • Category: Philosophy
  • Page: 624
  • View: 2683
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Why do major historical events such as the Holocaust occupy the forefront of the collective consciousness, while profound moments such as the Armenian genocide, the McCarthy era, and France's role in North Africa stand distantly behind? Is it possible that history "overly remembers" some events at the expense of others? A landmark work in philosophy, Paul Ricoeur's Memory, History, Forgetting examines this reciprocal relationship between remembering and forgetting, showing how it affects both the perception of historical experience and the production of historical narrative. Memory, History, Forgetting, like its title, is divided into three major sections. Ricoeur first takes a phenomenological approach to memory and mnemonical devices. The underlying question here is how a memory of present can be of something absent, the past. The second section addresses recent work by historians by reopening the question of the nature and truth of historical knowledge. Ricoeur explores whether historians, who can write a history of memory, can truly break with all dependence on memory, including memories that resist representation. The third and final section is a profound meditation on the necessity of forgetting as a condition for the possibility of remembering, and whether there can be something like happy forgetting in parallel to happy memory. Throughout the book there are careful and close readings of the texts of Aristotle and Plato, of Descartes and Kant, and of Halbwachs and Pierre Nora. A momentous achievement in the career of one of the most significant philosophers of our age, Memory, History, Forgetting provides the crucial link between Ricoeur's Time and Narrative and Oneself as Another and his recent reflections on ethics and the problems of responsibility and representation. “His success in revealing the internal relations between recalling and forgetting, and how this dynamic becomes problematic in light of events once present but now past, will inspire academic dialogue and response but also holds great appeal to educated general readers in search of both method for and insight from considering the ethical ramifications of modern events. . . . It is indeed a master work, not only in Ricoeur’s own vita but also in contemporary European philosophy.”—Library Journal “Ricoeur writes the best kind of philosophy—critical, economical, and clear.”— New York Times Book Review

The Better Angels of Our Nature

The Better Angels of Our Nature

Why Violence Has Declined

  • Author: Steven Pinker
  • Publisher: Penguin Group USA
  • ISBN: 0143122010
  • Category: Psychology
  • Page: 802
  • View: 8490
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Presents a controversial history of violence which argues that today's world is the most peaceful time in human existence, drawing on psychological insights into intrinsic values that are causing people to condemn violence as an acceptable measure.

When Languages Die

When Languages Die

The Extinction of the World's Languages and the Erosion of Human Knowledge

  • Author: K. David Harrison
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press
  • ISBN: 0195372069
  • Category: Language Arts & Disciplines
  • Page: 292
  • View: 5194
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Includes information on Australia, calendars, creation myths, directions, epics, fish, folksonomy, genetics, grammar, Himalayan mountains, horse, indigenous people, knowledge, literacy, maps, metaphor, months, naming, nomads, oral traditions, Os (middle Chulym), Papua New Guinea, place names, reindeer, rivers, shamans, sign languages, singing, song, species, taxonomy, units of time, time reckoning, Tofa (Tofalar, Karagas), Tuvan, writing systems, Yukaghir, etc.

The New Geography of Jobs

The New Geography of Jobs

  • Author: Enrico Moretti
  • Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
  • ISBN: 0547750145
  • Category: Business & Economics
  • Page: 304
  • View: 6254
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“A timely and smart discussion of how different cities and regions have made a changing economy work for them – and how policymakers can learn from that to lift the circumstances of working Americans everywhere.”—Barack Obama We’re used to thinking of the United States in opposing terms: red versus blue, haves versus have-nots. But today there are three Americas. At one extreme are the brain hubs—cities like San Francisco, Boston, and Durham—with workers who are among the most productive, creative, and best paid on the planet. At the other extreme are former manufacturing capitals, which are rapidly losing jobs and residents. The rest of America could go either way. For the past thirty years, the three Americas have been growing apart at an accelerating rate. This divergence is one the most important developments in the history of the United States and is reshaping the very fabric of our society, affecting all aspects of our lives, from health and education to family stability and political engagement. But the winners and losers aren’t necessarily who you’d expect. Enrico Moretti’s groundbreaking research shows that you don’t have to be a scientist or an engineer to thrive in one of the brain hubs. Carpenters, taxi-drivers, teachers, nurses, and other local service jobs are created at a ratio of five-to-one in the brain hubs, raising salaries and standard of living for all. Dealing with this split—supporting growth in the hubs while arresting the decline elsewhere—is the challenge of the century, and The New Geography of Jobs lights the way.

Wonders and the Order of Nature, 1150-1750

Wonders and the Order of Nature, 1150-1750

  • Author: Lorraine Daston,Katharine Park
  • Publisher: Mit Press
  • ISBN: N.A
  • Category: Science
  • Page: 511
  • View: 1348
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The authors explore the ways in which European naturalists, from the Middle Ages to the Enlightenment, used oddities and marvels to envision and explain the world.

Harnessed

Harnessed

How Language and Music Mimicked Nature and Transformed Ape to Man

  • Author: Mark Changizi
  • Publisher: BenBella Books, Inc.
  • ISBN: 1935618830
  • Category: Science
  • Page: 216
  • View: 9472
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The scientific consensus is that our ability to understand human speech has evolved over hundreds of thousands of years. After all, there are whole portions of the brain devoted to human speech. We learn to understand speech too quickly and with almost no training and can seamlessly absorb enormous amounts of information simply by hearing it. Surely we evolved this capability over thousands of generations. Or did we? Portions of the human brain are also devoted to reading. Children learn to read at a very young age and can seamlessly absorb information even more quickly through reading than through hearing. We know that we didn’t evolve to read because reading is only a few thousand years old. In "Harnessed," cognitive scientist Mark Changizi demonstrates that human speech has been very specifically “designed” to harness the sounds of nature, sounds we’ve evolved over millions of years to readily understand. Long before humans evolved, mammals have learned to interpret the sounds of nature to understand both threats and opportunities. Our speech—regardless of language—is very clearly based on the sounds of nature. Even more fascinating, Changizi shows that music itself is based on natural sounds. Music—seemingly one of the most human of inventions—is literally built on sounds and patterns of sound that have existed since the beginning of time.

Who We Are and How We Got Here

Who We Are and How We Got Here

Ancient DNA and the New Science of the Human Past

  • Author: David Reich
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press
  • ISBN: 0198821255
  • Category: DNA
  • Page: 368
  • View: 867
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David Reich describes how the revolution in the ability to sequence ancient DNA has changed our understanding of the deep human past. This book tells the emerging story of our often surprising ancestry - the extraordinary ancient migrations and mixtures of populations that have made us who we are.

Archaeology of Knowledge

Archaeology of Knowledge

  • Author: Michel Foucault
  • Publisher: Psychology Press
  • ISBN: 0415287529
  • Category: Philosophy
  • Page: 239
  • View: 8825
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In France, a country that awards its intellectuals the status other countries give their rock stars, Michel Foucault was part of a glittering generation of thinkers, one which also included Sartre, de Beauvoir and Deleuze. One of the great intellectual heroes of the twentieth century, Foucault was a man whose passion and reason were at the service of nearly every progressive cause of his time. From law and order, to mental health, to power and knowledge, he spearheaded public awareness of the dynamics that hold us all in thrall to a few powerful ideologies and interests. Arguably his finest work, Archaeology of Knowledge is a challenging but fantastically rewarding introduction to his ideas.

The Philosophy of History

The Philosophy of History

  • Author: Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel
  • Publisher: N.A
  • ISBN: N.A
  • Category: History
  • Page: 457
  • View: 9651
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History in Practice

History in Practice

  • Author: Ludmilla Jordanova
  • Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing
  • ISBN: 1472503554
  • Category: History
  • Page: 288
  • View: 3720
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History in Practice explores the discipline's breadth, its complexities and the tasks it takes on. This study by one of the liveliest and most acute practitioners in the field demystifies what historians do. It looks at history as an academic discipline but also engages with the extensive and sometimes troubling uses of historical ideas in the wider world. Historical work has public consequences and draws considerable energy from contemporary preoccupations. For this new edition of her respected book, Ludmilla Jordanova has revised the text and added a new chapter that explores the role of digital technology in historical practice. She pays attention both to recent trends in the discipline and to its basic characteristics. This book is essential reading for all students seeking an understanding of history as a discipline.

The Genius of Birds

The Genius of Birds

  • Author: Jennifer Ackerman
  • Publisher: Penguin
  • ISBN: 1101980842
  • Category: Science
  • Page: 352
  • View: 8417
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An award-winning science writer tours the globe to reveal what makes birds capable of such extraordinary feats of mental prowess Birds are astonishingly intelligent creatures. According to revolutionary new research, some birds rival primates and even humans in their remarkable forms of intelligence. In The Genius of Birds, acclaimed author Jennifer Ackerman explores their newly discovered brilliance and how it came about. As she travels around the world to the most cutting-edge frontiers of research, Ackerman not only tells the story of the recently uncovered genius of birds but also delves deeply into the latest findings about the bird brain itself that are shifting our view of what it means to be intelligent. At once personal yet scientific, richly informative and beautifully written, The Genius of Birds celebrates the triumphs of these surprising and fiercely intelligent creatures.

Shaping Written Knowledge

Shaping Written Knowledge

The Genre and Activity of the Experimental Article in Science

  • Author: Charles Bazerman
  • Publisher: N.A
  • ISBN: 9780299116941
  • Category: Literary Criticism
  • Page: 356
  • View: 7239
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The forms taken by scientific writing help to determine the very nature of science itself. In this closely reasoned study, Charles Bazerman views the changing forms of scientific writing as solutions to rhetorical problems faced by scientists arguing for their findings. Examining such works as the early Philosophical Transactions and Newton's optical writings as well as Physical Review, Bazerman views the changing forms of scientific writing as solutions to rhetorical problems faced by scientists. The rhetoric of science is, Bazerman demonstrates, an embedded part of scientific activity that interacts with other parts of scientific activity, including social structure and empirical experience. This book presents a comprehensive historical account of the rise and development of the genre, and views these forms in relation to empirical experience.

Measuring Student Knowledge and Skills A New Framework for Assessment

Measuring Student Knowledge and Skills A New Framework for Assessment

A New Framework for Assessment

  • Author: OECD
  • Publisher: OECD Publishing
  • ISBN: 9264173129
  • Category:
  • Page: 84
  • View: 368
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A New Framework for Assessment, the first volume in the PISA series, provides the conceptual framework on which the PISA 2000 assessment is based.

The Common Cause

The Common Cause

Creating Race and Nation in the American Revolution

  • Author: Robert G. Parkinson
  • Publisher: UNC Press Books
  • ISBN: 1469626926
  • Category: History
  • Page: 768
  • View: 3701
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When the Revolutionary War began, the odds of a united, continental effort to resist the British seemed nearly impossible. Few on either side of the Atlantic expected thirteen colonies to stick together in a war against their cultural cousins. In this pathbreaking book, Robert Parkinson argues that to unify the patriot side, political and communications leaders linked British tyranny to colonial prejudices, stereotypes, and fears about insurrectionary slaves and violent Indians. Manipulating newspaper networks, Washington, Jefferson, Adams, Franklin, and their fellow agitators broadcast stories of British agents inciting African Americans and Indians to take up arms against the American rebellion. Using rhetoric like "domestic insurrectionists" and "merciless savages," the founding fathers rallied the people around a common enemy and made racial prejudice a cornerstone of the new Republic. In a fresh reading of the founding moment, Parkinson demonstrates the dual projection of the "common cause." Patriots through both an ideological appeal to popular rights and a wartime movement against a host of British-recruited slaves and Indians forged a racialized, exclusionary model of American citizenship.

The Structure of Scientific Revolutions

The Structure of Scientific Revolutions

50th Anniversary Edition

  • Author: Thomas S. Kuhn
  • Publisher: University of Chicago Press
  • ISBN: 0226458148
  • Category: Science
  • Page: 264
  • View: 2297
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A good book may have the power to change the way we see the world, but a great book actually becomes part of our daily consciousness, pervading our thinking to the point that we take it for granted, and we forget how provocative and challenging its ideas once were—and still are. The Structure of Scientific Revolutions is that kind of book. When it was first published in 1962, it was a landmark event in the history and philosophy of science. Fifty years later, it still has many lessons to teach. With The Structure of Scientific Revolutions, Kuhn challenged long-standing linear notions of scientific progress, arguing that transformative ideas don’t arise from the day-to-day, gradual process of experimentation and data accumulation but that the revolutions in science, those breakthrough moments that disrupt accepted thinking and offer unanticipated ideas, occur outside of “normal science,” as he called it. Though Kuhn was writing when physics ruled the sciences, his ideas on how scientific revolutions bring order to the anomalies that amass over time in research experiments are still instructive in our biotech age. This new edition of Kuhn’s essential work in the history of science includes an insightful introduction by Ian Hacking, which clarifies terms popularized by Kuhn, including paradigm and incommensurability, and applies Kuhn’s ideas to the science of today. Usefully keyed to the separate sections of the book, Hacking’s introduction provides important background information as well as a contemporary context. Newly designed, with an expanded index, this edition will be eagerly welcomed by the next generation of readers seeking to understand the history of our perspectives on science.

Evidence in the Age of the New Sciences

Evidence in the Age of the New Sciences

  • Author: James A.T. Lancaster,Richard Raiswell
  • Publisher: Springer
  • ISBN: 9783319918686
  • Category: Philosophy
  • Page: 309
  • View: 1751
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The motto of the Royal Society—Nullius in verba—was intended to highlight the members’ rejection of received knowledge and the new place they afforded direct empirical evidence in their quest for genuine, useful knowledge about the world. But while many studies have raised questions about the construction, reception and authentication of knowledge, Evidence in the Age of the New Sciences is the first to examine the problem of evidence at this pivotal moment in European intellectual history. What constituted evidence—and for whom? Where might it be found? How should it be collected and organized? What is the relationship between evidence and proof? These are crucial questions, for what constitutes evidence determines how people interrogate the world and the kind of arguments they make about it. In this important new collection, Lancaster and Raiswell have assembled twelve studies that capture aspects of the debate over evidence in a variety of intellectual contexts. From law and theology to geography, medicine and experimental philosophy, the chapters highlight the great diversity of approaches to evidence-gathering that existed side by side in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. In this way, the volume makes an important addition to the literature on early science and knowledge formation, and will be of particular interest to scholars and advanced students in these fields.