Search Results for "the-supreme-court-under-marshall-and-taney"

The Taney Court

The Taney Court

Justices, Rulings, and Legacy

  • Author: Timothy S. Huebner
  • Publisher: ABC-CLIO
  • ISBN: 1576073688
  • Category: Law
  • Page: 288
  • View: 3655
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An exploration of the US Supreme Court under Roger Taney during an era of dramatic selectionism, slavery and civil war. Included is a survey of the historical period and an examination of the decisions reached in the court's most important cases.

The Supreme Court in American Society

The Supreme Court in American Society

Equal Justice Under Law

  • Author: Kermit Hall
  • Publisher: Taylor & Francis
  • ISBN: 9780815337577
  • Category: History
  • Page: 788
  • View: 8288
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Readable and information-filled, The Supreme Court in American Society is a valuable reference for students of law and history alike."--Jacket.

The Revolutionary Constitution

The Revolutionary Constitution

  • Author: David J. Bodenhamer
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press
  • ISBN: 019991303X
  • Category: History
  • Page: 296
  • View: 8987
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The framers of the Constitution chose their words carefully when they wrote of a more perfect union--not absolutely perfect, but with room for improvement. Indeed, we no longer operate under the same Constitution as that ratified in 1788, or even the one completed by the Bill of Rights in 1791--because we are no longer the same nation. In The Revolutionary Constitution, David J. Bodenhamer provides a comprehensive new look at America's basic law, integrating the latest legal scholarship with historical context to highlight how it has evolved over time. The Constitution, he notes, was the product of the first modern revolution, and revolutions are, by definition, moments when the past shifts toward an unfamiliar future, one radically different from what was foreseen only a brief time earlier. In seeking to balance power and liberty, the framers established a structure that would allow future generations to continually readjust the scale. Bodenhamer explores this dynamic through seven major constitutional themes: federalism, balance of powers, property, representation, equality, rights, and security. With each, he takes a historical approach, following their changes over time. For example, the framers wrote multiple protections for property rights into the Constitution in response to actions by state governments after the Revolution. But twentieth-century courts--and Congress--redefined property rights through measures such as zoning and the designation of historical landmarks (diminishing their commercial value) in response to the needs of a modern economy. The framers anticipated just such a future reworking of their own compromises between liberty and power. With up-to-the-minute legal expertise and a broad grasp of the social and political context, this book is a tour de force of Constitutional history and analysis.

John Marshall

John Marshall

Definer of a Nation

  • Author: Jean Edward Smith
  • Publisher: Henry Holt and Company
  • ISBN: 1466862319
  • Category: Biography & Autobiography
  • Page: 752
  • View: 2445
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A New York Times Notable Book of 1996 It was in tolling the death of Supreme Court Chief Justice John Marshall in 1835 that the Liberty Bell cracked, never to ring again. An apt symbol of the man who shaped both court and country, whose life "reads like an early history of the United States," as the Wall Street Journal noted, adding: Jean Edward Smith "does an excellent job of recounting the details of Marshall's life without missing the dramatic sweep of the history it encompassed."

Ideas Are Weapons

Ideas Are Weapons

The History and Uses of Ideas

  • Author: Max Lerner
  • Publisher: Transaction Publishers
  • ISBN: 9781412825788
  • Category: Political Science
  • Page: 553
  • View: 7513
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The Supreme Court

The Supreme Court

A Concise History

  • Author: Robert W. Langran,Robert Langran
  • Publisher: Peter Lang
  • ISBN: 9780820461625
  • Category: Law
  • Page: 149
  • View: 5152
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This essential historical overview begins by noting that the Supreme Court is -arguably the least known and understood of the three branches of government-. Robert W. Langran's innovative approach will do much to provide students with a good understanding of the changing role and accomplishments of the Court from its inception to its latest decisions. This book discusses the most important decisions of the Court in chronological rather than topical order, illustrating how the cases fit into an historical timeframe as well as what roles the most influential justices played. In an easy, conversational style, Robert W. Langran discusses how the Court was formed, how justices are selected, how the Court selects its cases, and the broad shifts of the Court with regard to doctrine and attention to the popular and governmental interests of each period. Students gain important insights into why each Court voted the way it did and how those decisions influenced the votes of future Courts. "The Supreme Court," an excellent supplementary text for undergraduate classes in American government and American history, as well as introductory classes in political science, contains useful appendixes listing all justices and all cases discussed."

The Treason Trial of Aaron Burr

The Treason Trial of Aaron Burr

Law, Politics, and the Character Wars of the New Nation

  • Author: R. Kent Newmyer
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press
  • ISBN: 1107022185
  • Category: History
  • Page: 226
  • View: 3382
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The Burr trial pitted Marshall, Jefferson and Burr in a dramatic three-way contest that left a permanent mark on the new nation.

"Times Are Altered with Us"

American Indians from First Contact to the New Republic

  • Author: Roger M. Carpenter
  • Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
  • ISBN: 1118733150
  • Category: History
  • Page: 312
  • View: 6973
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"Times Are Altered with Us": American Indians from Contact to the New Republic offers a concise and engaging introduction to the turbulent 300-year-period of the history of Native Americans and their interactions with Europeans—and then Americans—from 1492 to 1800. Considers the interactions of American Indians at many points of "First Contact" across North America, from the Gulf of Mexico to the Pacific and Atlantic Coasts Explores the early years of contact, trade, reciprocity, and colonization, from initial engagement of different Indian and European peoples—Spanish, French, Dutch, English, and Russian—up to the start of tenuous and stormy relations with the new American government Charts the rapid decline in American Indian populations due to factors including epidemic Old World diseases, genocide and warfare by explorers and colonists, tribal warfare, and the detrimental effects of resource ruination and displacement from traditional lands Features a completely up-to-date synthesis of the literature of the field Incorporates useful student features, including maps, illustrations, and a comprehensive and evaluative Bibliographical Essay Written in an engaging style by an expert in Native American history and designed for use in both the U.S. history survey as well as dedicated courses in Native American studies

A History of the Supreme Court

A History of the Supreme Court

  • Author: Bernard Schwartz
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press
  • ISBN: 9780195093872
  • Category: History
  • Page: 465
  • View: 9245
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A comprehensive history of the United States Supreme Court from its ill-esteemed beginning in 1790 to one of the most important and controversial branches of the Federal government.

When Labels Fail

When Labels Fail

POLITICS, VALUES, AND IDEOLOGY ON THE SUPREME COURT

  • Author: C.B. Shotwell
  • Publisher: Xlibris Corporation
  • ISBN: 1450081282
  • Category: Law
  • Page: 217
  • View: 3617
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WHEN LABELS FAIL: A PARADOXICAL VIEW OF THE SUPREME COURT As in recent actions of the Supreme Court concerning same sex marriage and the Affordable Care Act, don ́t be surprised when pundits and ideologues fail at predictions regarding pending decisions of the Court. This book explains why so many get it wrong so often. At root cause are erroneous preconceptions about the Court. "I ́m not big on labels" replied retiring Associate Justice John Paul Stevens during an interview concerning changing blocs on the Supreme Court. “I don’t use labels to describe what I do” is how Supreme Court nominee Sonia Sotomayor responded during her confirmation hearing when a senator sought to categorize her judicial philosophy. Simplistic labels for the justices have repeatedly misled Presidents, Senators, lawyers, and pundits with regard to the performance of justices on the Supreme Court. Despite best efforts to predict behavior of nominees for the Court, the justices defied political categorization, such as: • The Virginia lawyer who lost his states’ rights case before the Supreme Court, but went on to support Federalist Party causes as Chief Justice. • The ex-Federalist Party politician and Secretary of the Treasury who as Chief Justice strongly supported states’ rights. • The esteemed Massachusetts justice who outraged the progressive president who nominated him to the Court by voting to strike down key anti-trust legislation. • The co-founder of the American Civil Liberties Union who shocked former colleagues by consistently voting to curtail civil liberties and civil rights in cases before the Court. • The staunch New Deal supporter who over his long tenure on the Court came to favor individual rights and liberties over governmental power. • The former Ku Klux Klan member who helped forge a unanimous Court ruling in the seminal decision against racial segregation. • Appointed by a liberal Democratic president, the justice who steadfastly supported law and order, the right to life, and other conservative causes. • An originalist whose conservative methodology frequently leads to liberal results. This book explores the origin of the separation of powers doctrine, how the Constitution created a judiciary designed to stand apart from the “political” branches of government, and how justices have asserted independence as a third branch of government from John Jay to John Roberts. For more information, go to: www.courtpolitics.weebly.com