Search Results for "the-tragedy-of-liberation"

The Tragedy of Liberation

The Tragedy of Liberation

A History of the Chinese Revolution 1945-1957

  • Author: Frank Dikötter
  • Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA
  • ISBN: 1620403471
  • Category: History
  • Page: 400
  • View: 7789
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“The Chinese Communist party refers to its victory in 1949 as a ‘liberation.’ In China the story of liberation and the revolution that followed is not one of peace, liberty, and justice. It is first and foremost a story of calculated terror and systematic violence.” So begins Frank Dikötter’s stunning and revelatory chronicle of Mao Zedong’s ascension and campaign to transform the Chinese into what the party called New People. Following the defeat of Chiang Kai-shek in 1949, after a bloody civil war, Mao hoisted the red flag over Beijing’s Forbidden City, and the world watched as the Communist revolution began to wash away the old order. Due to the secrecy surrounding the country’s records, little has been known before now about the eight years that followed, preceding the massive famine and Great Leap Forward. Drawing on hundreds of previously classified documents, secret police reports, unexpurgated versions of leadership speeches, eyewitness accounts of those who survived, and more, The Tragedy of Liberation bears witness to a shocking, largely untold history. Interweaving stories of ordinary citizens with tales of the brutal politics of Mao’s court, Frank Dikötter illuminates those who shaped the “liberation” and the horrific policies they implemented in the name of progress. People of all walks of life were caught up in the tragedy that unfolded, and whether or not they supported the revolution, all of them were asked to write confessions, denounce their friends, and answer queries about their political reliability. One victim of thought reform called it a “carefully cultivated Auschwitz of the mind.” Told with great narrative sweep, The Tragedy of Liberation is a powerful and important document giving voice at last to the millions who were lost, and casting new light on the foundations of one of the most powerful regimes of the twenty-first century.

Mao's Great Famine

Mao's Great Famine

The History of China's Most Devastating Catastrophe, 1958-1962

  • Author: Frank Dikötter
  • Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA
  • ISBN: 9780802779281
  • Category: History
  • Page: 448
  • View: 2752
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Winner of the Samuel Johnson Prize An unprecedented, groundbreaking history of China's Great Famine that recasts the era of Mao Zedong and the history of the People's Republic of China. "Between 1958 and 1962, China descended into hell. Mao Zedong threw his country into a frenzy with the Great Leap Forward, an attempt to catch up to and overtake Britain in less than 15 years The experiment ended in the greatest catastrophe the country had ever known, destroying tens of millions of lives." So opens Frank Dikötter's riveting, magnificently detailed chronicle of an era in Chinese history much speculated about but never before fully documented because access to Communist Party archives has long been restricted to all but the most trusted historians. A new archive law has opened up thousands of central and provincial documents that "fundamentally change the way one can study the Maoist era." Dikötter makes clear, as nobody has before, that far from being the program that would lift the country among the world's superpowers and prove the power of Communism, as Mao imagined, the Great Leap Forward transformed the country in the other direction. It became the site not only of "one of the most deadly mass killings of human history,"--at least 45 million people were worked, starved, or beaten to death--but also of "the greatest demolition of real estate in human history," as up to one-third of all housing was turned into rubble). The experiment was a catastrophe for the natural world as well, as the land was savaged in the maniacal pursuit of steel and other industrial accomplishments. In a powerful mesghing of exhaustive research in Chinese archives and narrative drive, Dikötter for the first time links up what happened in the corridors of power-the vicious backstabbing and bullying tactics that took place among party leaders-with the everyday experiences of ordinary people, giving voice to the dead and disenfranchised. His magisterial account recasts the history of the People's Republic of China.

The Tragedy of the Chinese Revolution

The Tragedy of the Chinese Revolution

  • Author: Harold Isaacs
  • Publisher: Haymarket Books
  • ISBN: 9781608461097
  • Category: History
  • Page: 408
  • View: 8757
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The story of how China's modern development rests on the tragically supressed struggle for true socialism.

The Cultural Revolution

The Cultural Revolution

A People's History, 1962—1976

  • Author: Frank Dikötter
  • Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA
  • ISBN: 1632864223
  • Category: History
  • Page: 432
  • View: 4451
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The concluding volume--following Mao's Great Famine and The Tragedy of Liberation--in Frank Dikötter's award-winning trilogy chronicling the Communist revolution in China. After the economic disaster of the Great Leap Forward that claimed tens of millions of lives from 1958–1962, an aging Mao Zedong launched an ambitious scheme to shore up his reputation and eliminate those he viewed as a threat to his legacy. The stated goal of the Cultural Revolution was to purge the country of bourgeois, capitalistic elements he claimed were threatening genuine communist ideology. Young students formed the Red Guards, vowing to defend the Chairman to the death, but soon rival factions started fighting each other in the streets with semiautomatic weapons in the name of revolutionary purity. As the country descended into chaos, the military intervened, turning China into a garrison state marked by bloody purges that crushed as many as one in fifty people. The Cultural Revolution: A People's History, 1962–1976 draws for the first time on hundreds of previously classified party documents, from secret police reports to unexpurgated versions of leadership speeches. Frank Dikötter uses this wealth of material to undermine the picture of complete conformity that is often supposed to have characterized the last years of the Mao era. After the army itself fell victim to the Cultural Revolution, ordinary people used the political chaos to resurrect the market and hollow out the party's ideology. In short, they buried Maoism. By showing how economic reform from below was an unintended consequence of a decade of violent purges and entrenched fear, The Cultural Revolution casts China's most tumultuous era in a wholly new light.

Tombstone

Tombstone

The Great Chinese Famine, 1958-1962

  • Author: Yang Jisheng
  • Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux
  • ISBN: 1466827793
  • Category: History
  • Page: 656
  • View: 9965
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The much-anticipated definitive account of China's Great Famine An estimated thirty-six million Chinese men, women, and children starved to death during China's Great Leap Forward in the late 1950s and early '60s. One of the greatest tragedies of the twentieth century, the famine is poorly understood, and in China is still euphemistically referred to as "the three years of natural disaster." As a journalist with privileged access to official and unofficial sources, Yang Jisheng spent twenty years piecing together the events that led to mass nationwide starvation, including the death of his own father. Finding no natural causes, Yang attributes responsibility for the deaths to China's totalitarian system and the refusal of officials at every level to value human life over ideology and self-interest. Tombstone is a testament to inhumanity and occasional heroism that pits collective memory against the historical amnesia imposed by those in power. Stunning in scale and arresting in its detailed account of the staggering human cost of this tragedy, Tombstone is written both as a memorial to the lives lost—an enduring tombstone in memory of the dead—and in hopeful anticipation of the final demise of the totalitarian system. Ian Johnson, writing in The New York Review of Books, called the Chinese edition of Tombstone "groundbreaking . . . One of the most important books to come out of China in recent years."

The Tragedy of Technology

The Tragedy of Technology

Human Liberation Versus Domination in the Late Twentieth Century

  • Author: Stephen Hill
  • Publisher: Pluto Press
  • ISBN: N.A
  • Category: Social Science
  • Page: 294
  • View: 6617
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Mao's Last Revolution

Mao's Last Revolution

  • Author: Roderick MACFARQUHAR,Michael Schoenhals
  • Publisher: Harvard University Press
  • ISBN: 0674040414
  • Category: History
  • Page: 752
  • View: 8367
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The Cultural Revolution was a watershed event in the history of the People's Republic of China, the defining decade of half a century of communist rule. Before 1966, China was a typical communist state, with a command economy and a powerful party able to keep the population under control. But during the Cultural Revolution, in a move unprecedented in any communist country, Mao unleashed the Red Guards against the party. Tens of thousands of officials were humiliated, tortured, and even killed. Order had to be restored by the military, whose methods were often equally brutal. In a masterly book, Roderick MacFarquhar and Michael Schoenhals explain why Mao launched the Cultural Revolution, and show his Machiavellian role in masterminding it (which Chinese publications conceal). In often horrifying detail, they document the Hobbesian state that ensued. The movement veered out of control and terror paralyzed the country. Power struggles raged among Lin Biao, Zhou Enlai, Deng Xiaoping, and Jiang Qing--Mao's wife and leader of the Gang of Four--while Mao often played one against the other. After Mao's death, in reaction to the killing and the chaos, Deng Xiaoping led China into a reform era in which capitalism flourishes and the party has lost its former authority. In its invaluable critical analysis of Chairman Mao and its brilliant portrait of a culture in turmoil, "Mao's Last Revolution" offers the most authoritative and compelling account to date of this seminal event in the history of China.

Hungry Ghosts

Hungry Ghosts

Mao's Secret Famine

  • Author: Jasper Becker
  • Publisher: Macmillan
  • ISBN: 9780805056686
  • Category: History
  • Page: 380
  • View: 637
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Exposes the horrible result of Mao's attempted utopian engineering in China between 1958 and 1962, uncovering a bloody trail of terror, cannibalism, torture, and murder

Valley of Death

Valley of Death

The Tragedy at Dien Bien Phu That Led America into the Vietnam War

  • Author: Ted Morgan
  • Publisher: Random House
  • ISBN: 1588369803
  • Category: History
  • Page: 752
  • View: 5641
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Pulitzer Prize–winning author Ted Morgan has now written a rich and definitive account of the fateful battle that ended French rule in Indochina—and led inexorably to America’s Vietnam War. Dien Bien Phu was a remote valley on the border of Laos along a simple rural trade route. But it would also be where a great European power fell to an underestimated insurgent army and lost control of a crucial colony. Valley of Death is the untold story of the 1954 battle that, in six weeks, changed the course of history. A veteran of the French Army, Ted Morgan has made use of exclusive firsthand reports to create the most complete and dramatic telling of the conflict ever written. Here is the history of the Vietminh liberation movement’s rebellion against French occupation after World War II and its growth as an adversary, eventually backed by Communist China. Here too is the ill-fated French plan to build a base in Dien Bien Phu and draw the Vietminh into a debilitating defeat—which instead led to the Europeans being encircled in the surrounding hills, besieged by heavy artillery, overrun, and defeated. Making expert use of recently unearthed or released information, Morgan reveals the inner workings of the American effort to aid France, with Eisenhower secretly disdainful of the French effort and prophetically worried that “no military victory was possible in that type of theater.” Morgan paints indelible portraits of all the major players, from Henri Navarre, head of the French Union forces, a rigid professional unprepared for an enemy fortified by rice carried on bicycles, to his commander, General Christian de Castries, a privileged, miscast cavalry officer, and General Vo Nguyen Giap, a master of guerrilla warfare working out of a one-room hut on the side of a hill. Most devastatingly, Morgan sets the stage for the Vietnam quagmire that was to come. Superbly researched and powerfully written, Valley of Death is the crowning achievement of an author whose work has always been as compulsively readable as it is important. From the Hardcover edition.

Don Drummond

Don Drummond

The Genius and Tragedy of the World's Greatest Trombonist

  • Author: Heather Augustyn
  • Publisher: McFarland
  • ISBN: 1476603332
  • Category: Music
  • Page: 244
  • View: 6571
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"This is a comprehensive biography of a brilliant musician and his lover who forever shaped the course of ska, reggae, and popular music worldwide despite poverty, class separation, mental illness, racial politics, exploitation, and sexism that resulted in murder. Through the words of Don Drummond's childhood friends, classmates, musicians, medical staff, legal counsel, and teachers"--

The Discourse of Race in Modern China

The Discourse of Race in Modern China

  • Author: Frank Dikötter
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press
  • ISBN: 0190231130
  • Category: History
  • Page: 256
  • View: 8693
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Previous edition published in 1992 by Stanford University Press.

Ska

Ska

The Rhythm of Liberation

  • Author: Heather Augustyn
  • Publisher: Scarecrow Press
  • ISBN: 081088450X
  • Category: Music
  • Page: 180
  • View: 3439
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In Ska: The Rhythm of Liberation, Heather Augustyn examines how ska music first emerged in Jamaica as a fusion of popular, traditional, and even classical musical forms. As a genre, it was a connection to Africa, a means of expression and protest, and a respite from the struggles of colonization and grinding poverty. Ska would later travel with West Indian immigrants to the United Kingdom, where British youth embraced the music, blending it with punk and pop and working its origins as a music of protest and escape into their present lives. The fervor of the music matched the energy of the streets as racism, poverty, and violence ran rampant. But ska called for brotherhood and unity.

The Vikings

The Vikings

A History

  • Author: Robert Ferguson
  • Publisher: Penguin
  • ISBN: 9781101151426
  • Category: History
  • Page: 464
  • View: 5289
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A comprehensive and thrilling history of the Vikings for fans of the History Channel series From Harald Bluetooth to Cnut the Great, the feared seamen and plunderers of the Viking Age ruled Norway, Sweden, and Denmark but roamed as far as Byzantium, Greenland, and America. Raiders and traders, settlers and craftsmen, the medieval Scandinavians who have become familiar to history as Vikings never lose their capacity to fascinate, from their ingeniously designed longboats to their stormy pantheon of Viking gods and goddesses, ruled by Odin in Valhalla. Robert Ferguson is a sure guide across what he calls "the treacherous marches which divide legend from fact in Viking Age history." His long familiarity with the literary culture of Scandinavia with its skaldic poetry is combined with the latest archaeological discoveries to reveal a sweeping picture of the Norsemen, one of history's most amazing civilizations. Impeccably researched and filled with compelling accounts and analyses of legendary Viking warriors and Norse mythology, The Vikings is an indispensable guide to medieval Scandinavia and is a wonderful companion to the History Channel series.

Cultures of Confinement

Cultures of Confinement

A History of the Prison in Africa, Asia, and Latin America

  • Author: Frank Dikötter,Ian Brown
  • Publisher: Cornell University Press
  • ISBN: 1501721267
  • Category: History
  • Page: 384
  • View: 926
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Prisons are on the increase from the United States to China, as ever-larger proportions of humanity find themselves behind bars. While prisons now span the world, we know little about their history in global perspective. Rather than interpreting the prison's proliferation as the predictable result of globalization, Cultures of Confinement underlines the fact that the prison was never simply imposed by colonial powers or copied by elites eager to emulate the West, but was reinvented and transformed by a host of local factors, its success being dependent on its very flexibility. Complex cultural negotiations took place in encounters between different parts of the world, and rather than assigning a passive role to Latin America, Asia, and Africa, the authors of this book point out the acts of resistance or appropriation that altered the social practices associated with confinement. The prison, in short, was understood in culturally specific ways and reinvented in a variety of local contexts examined here for the first time in global perspective.

Mao

Mao

The Unknown Story

  • Author: Jung Chang,Jon Halliday
  • Publisher: Anchor
  • ISBN: 0307807134
  • Category: Biography & Autobiography
  • Page: 864
  • View: 5167
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The most authoritative life of the Chinese leader every written, Mao: The Unknown Story is based on a decade of research, and on interviews with many of Mao’s close circle in China who have never talked before — and with virtually everyone outside China who had significant dealings with him. It is full of startling revelations, exploding the myth of the Long March, and showing a completely unknown Mao: he was not driven by idealism or ideology; his intimate and intricate relationship with Stalin went back to the 1920s, ultimately bringing him to power; he welcomed Japanese occupation of much of China; and he schemed, poisoned, and blackmailed to get his way. After Mao conquered China in 1949, his secret goal was to dominate the world. In chasing this dream he caused the deaths of 38 million people in the greatest famine in history. In all, well over 70 million Chinese perished under Mao’s rule — in peacetime.

After Daybreak

After Daybreak

The Liberation of Bergen-Belsen, 1945

  • Author: Ben Shephard
  • Publisher: Schocken
  • ISBN: 0307424634
  • Category: History
  • Page: 288
  • View: 3211
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“I find it hard even now to get into focus all these horrors, my mind is really quite incapable of taking in everything I saw because it was all so completely foreign to everything I had previously believed or thought possible.” British Major Ben Barnett’s words echoed the sentiments shared by medical students, Allied soldiers, members of the clergy, ambulance drivers, and relief workers who found themselves utterly unprepared to comprehend, much less tend to, the indescribable trauma of those who survived at the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp. The liberation of Bergen-Belsen by the British in April 1945 was a defining point in history: the moment the world finally became inescapably aware of the Holocaust. But what happened after Belsen was liberated is still a matter of dispute. Was it an epic of medical heroism or the culmination of thirteen years of indifference to the fate of Europe’s Jews? This startling investigation by acclaimed documentary filmmaker and historian Ben Shephard draws on an extraordinary range of materials–contemporary diaries, military documents, and survivors’ testimonies–to reconstruct six weeks at Belsen beginning on April 15, 1945, and reveals what actually caused the post-liberation deaths of nearly 14,000 concentration camp inmates who might otherwise have lived. Why did it take almost two weeks to organize a proper medical response? Why were the medical teams sent to Belsen so poorly equipped? Why, when specialists did arrive, did they get so much of the medicine plain wrong? For the first time, Shephard explores the humanitarian and medical issues surrounding the liberation of the camp and provides a detailed, illuminating account that is far more complex than had been previously revealed. This gripping book confronts the terrifying aftermath of war with questions that still haunt us today. From the Hardcover edition.

Mao

Mao

A Life

  • Author: Philip Short
  • Publisher: Macmillan
  • ISBN: 9780805066388
  • Category: Biography & Autobiography
  • Page: 782
  • View: 2855
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Winter 2001

Livre Noir Du Communisme

Livre Noir Du Communisme

Crimes, Terreur, Répression

  • Author: Stéphane Courtois,Mark Kramer
  • Publisher: Harvard University Press
  • ISBN: 9780674076082
  • Category: History
  • Page: 858
  • View: 312
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Collects and analyzes seventy years of communist crimes that offer details on Kim Sung's Korea, Vietnam under "Uncle Ho," and Cuba under Castro.

Grant

Grant

  • Author: Ron Chernow
  • Publisher: Penguin
  • ISBN: 159420487X
  • Category: Biography & Autobiography
  • Page: 1074
  • View: 8900
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"Ulysses S. Grant's life has typically been misunderstood. All too often he is caricatured as a chronic loser and inept businessman, or as the triumphant but brutal Union general of the Civil War. But these stereotypes don't come close to capturing him, as Ron Chernow shows in his masterful biography, the first to provide a complete understanding of the general and president whose fortunes rose and fell with dizzying speed and frequency."--Book jacket.

The Killing Wind

The Killing Wind

A Chinese County's Descent Into Madness During the Cultural Revolution

  • Author: Guo Jian,Stacy Mosher
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press
  • ISBN: 0190622520
  • Category:
  • Page: 336
  • View: 9794
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Over the course of 66 days in 1967, more than 9,000 Chinese "class enemies" - including young children and the elderly - were murdered in Dao, a county in the Hunan province. Commonly known as the Daoxian massacre, the killings were one of the many acts of mass violence and radicalism thatrocked China during the Cultural Revolution. However, in spite of the scope and brutality of the killings, there are few detailed accounts of what took place on the ground. Years after the massacre, writer and editor Tan Hecheng was sent to Dao to report on the official investigation into the killings. Unable to publish his findings in China, in The Killing Wind he provides a first-hand investigation of the atrocities, exploring how and why the massacre took place. Tanblends his research with the recollections of survivors, offering a vivid account of the massacre and its aftermath. Dispelling much of Mao Zedong's mythos of peasant revolution, Tan reveals that the killings were unprovoked, and carried out with stomach-churning brutality. Far from the tyrannicallandlords depicted in revolutionary propaganda, most of the victims were hard-working, peaceful people who were technically considered part of the rural middle class. Other victims were peasants themselves, targeted because they had offended their killers in political or financial disputes. More than a catalog of horrors, Tan also offers a poignant meditation on memory, moral culpability, and the failure of the Chinese government to come to terms with the crimes of the Maoist era. By painting a detailed portrait of the massacres, The Killing Wind makes a broader argument about the longterm consequences of one of the twentieth century's greatest human tragedies. A compelling testament to the victims and survivors of the Daoxian massacre, The Killing Wind is a monument to historical truth, one that fills an immense gap in our understanding of Mao, the Cultural Revolution, and thestatus of truth in contemporary China.