Search Results for "trust-in-international-relations"

Trust in International Relations

Trust in International Relations

Rationalist, Constructivist, and Psychological Approaches

  • Author: Hiski Haukkala,Carina van de Wetering,Johanna Vuorelma
  • Publisher: Routledge
  • ISBN: 1351807838
  • Category: Political Science
  • Page: 188
  • View: 7839
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Trust is a core concept in International Relations (IR), representing a key ingredient in state relations. It was only relatively recently that IR scholars began to probe what trust really is, how it can be studied, and how it affects state relations. In the process three distinct ways of theorising trust in IR have emerged: trust as a rational choice calculation, as a social phenomenon or as a psychological dimension. Trust in International Relations explores trust through these different lenses using case studies to analyse the relative strengths and weaknesses of different approaches. The case studies cover relations between: United States and India ASEAN and Southeast Asian countries Finland and Sweden USA and Egypt The European Union and Russia Turkey’s relations with the West This book provides insights with real-world relevance in the fields of crisis and conflict management, and will be of great interest for students and scholars of IR, security studies and development studies who are looking to develop a more sophisticated understanding of how different theories of trust can be used in different situations.

Trust and Mistrust in International Relations

Trust and Mistrust in International Relations

  • Author: Andrew H. Kydd
  • Publisher: Princeton University Press
  • ISBN: 0691188513
  • Category: Political Science
  • Page: N.A
  • View: 477
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The difference between war and peace can be a matter of trust. States that trust each other can cooperate and remain at peace. States that mistrust each other enough can wage preventive wars, attacking now in fear that the other side will attack in the future. In this groundbreaking book, Andrew Kydd develops a theory of trust in international relations and applies it to the Cold War. Grounded in a realist tradition but arriving at conclusions very different from current realist approaches, this theory is the first systematic game theoretic approach to trust in international relations, and is also the first to explicitly consider how we as external observers should make inferences about the trustworthiness of states. Kydd makes three major claims. First, while trustworthy states may enter conflict, when we see conflict we should become more convinced that the states involved are untrustworthy. Second, strong states, traditionally thought to promote cooperation, can do so only if they are relatively trustworthy. Third, even states that strongly mistrust each other can reassure each other and cooperate provided they are trustworthy. The book's historical chapters focus on the growing mistrust at the beginning of the Cold War. Contrary to the common view that both sides were willing to compromise but failed because of mistrust, Kydd argues that most of the mistrust in the Cold War was justified, because the Soviets were not trustworthy.

Trust and Hedging in International Relations

Trust and Hedging in International Relations

  • Author: Kendall Stiles
  • Publisher: University of Michigan Press
  • ISBN: 0472130706
  • Category: Political Science
  • Page: 318
  • View: 7378
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Revolutionary analysis of the risky role of trust in foreign policy through the assessment of European microstates and their partners

Trust in International Cooperation

Trust in International Cooperation

International Security Institutions, Domestic Politics and American Multilateralism

  • Author: Brian C. Rathbun
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press
  • ISBN: 1139505254
  • Category: Political Science
  • Page: N.A
  • View: 9076
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Trust in International Cooperation challenges conventional wisdoms concerning the part which trust plays in international cooperation and the origins of American multilateralism. Brian C. Rathbun questions rational institutionalist arguments, demonstrating that trust precedes rather than follows the creation of international organizations. Drawing on social psychology, he shows that individuals placed in the same structural circumstances show markedly different propensities to cooperate based on their beliefs about the trustworthiness of others. Linking this finding to political psychology, Rathbun explains why liberals generally pursue a more multilateral foreign policy than conservatives, evident in the Democratic Party's greater support for a genuinely multilateral League of Nations, United Nations and North Atlantic Treaty Organization. Rathbun argues that the post-World War Two bipartisan consensus on multilateralism is a myth, and differences between the parties are growing continually starker.

Trusting Enemies

Trusting Enemies

Interpersonal Relationships in International Conflict

  • Author: Nicholas J. Wheeler
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press
  • ISBN: 0192512668
  • Category: Political Science
  • Page: 255
  • View: 6450
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How can two states with enemy relations transform their relationship? Nicholas Wheeler argues that the discipline of International Relations has not done a good job of answering this question because its focus has been on the state and the individual levels of analysis. In this ground-breaking book, he argues for the importance of a new level of analysis in trust research the interpersonal relationships between state leaders. In doing so, he makes two key contributions. Firstly, developing a new theory of interpersonal trust that can be applied to the international level, and secondly, showing how this theory contributes to the literature on signalling in IR. The theory of interpersonal trust developed in the book provides a novel response to the central problem identified by signalling theory in IR: whether the receivers of signals interpret them in the way intended by their senders. The author argues that, in fact, trust between two leaders is causally prior to the accurate interpretation of the signals they send with the aim of communicating peaceful intent. Trust, therefore, does away with the problem of the ambiguity of signal interpretation. He goes on to examine exactly how a new relationship of trust emerges between two leaders who represent states with enemy relations: through face-to-face interaction and the crucial process of bonding between them that this makes possible. This powerful new theory of interpersonal trust is applied to three cases: the personal interactions between US and Soviet leaders Ronald Reagan and Mikhail Gorbachev in ending the Cold War; the face-to-face interactions between Indian Prime Minister Atal Bihari Vajpayee and Pakistani Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif in reducing conflict between India and Pakistan in 1998-1999; and the interactions in 2009-10 between Barack Obama and Ayatollah Ali Khamenei that failed to achieve a breakthrough in US-Iran nuclear relations.

Trust and Distrust in Sino-American Relations

Trust and Distrust in Sino-American Relations

Challenge and Opportunity

  • Author: Steve Chan
  • Publisher: Rapid Communications in Confli
  • ISBN: 9781604979978
  • Category: Political Science
  • Page: 261
  • View: 6734
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Gauging another state's trustworthiness -- A weak form of trust reflecting external compulsion -- A semi-strong form of trust motivated by reputational considerations -- A strong form of trust grounded in appropriateness and unthinkability

Political Trust and the Politics of Security Engagement

Political Trust and the Politics of Security Engagement

China and the European Union in Africa

  • Author: Benjamin Barton
  • Publisher: Routledge
  • ISBN: 1351714279
  • Category: Political Science
  • Page: 212
  • View: 2154
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The EU and China are often characterised as parties whose bilateral political differences still remain too large to bridge, so that they have failed to convert rhetorical promises into tangible results of cooperation, particularly with regards to the field of international security. Yet in terms of their bilateral interaction on security risk management in Africa; EU and Chinese naval officers jointly brought down the number of successful Somali pirate attacks in the Gulf of Aden and to a lesser extent were jointly involved in seeking a resolution to the lingering conflict in Darfur. This book asks how we can make sense as a whole of this relatively sudden shift in regards to the dealings between their respective officials on the topic of security risk management. It argues that the outcomes of Sino-European bilateral dealings on this topic are above all determined by the ability/inability of these officials to build political trust as a complex and cognitive social phenomenon. Consequently, the book applies an innovative conceptual framework on political trust to explain why EU and Chinese officials bridged their ‘endemic’ political differences to practically cooperate on Somali piracy but were unable to do so when it came to their interaction on Darfur. To conclude, it examines the longer term impact of this bilateral trust-building process by covering more recent examples of bilateral engagement in Libya and Mali and aims to show that although this trust-building process may be case specific, ramifications may go beyond the realm of their bilateral dealings on security matters in Africa, to impact wider issues of international security. This text will be of key interest to scholars and students of African and Chinese politics, EU politics, security and maritime studies, and more broadly of international relations and to governmental actors.

Rational Theory of International Politics

Rational Theory of International Politics

The Logic of Competition and Cooperation

  • Author: Charles L. Glaser
  • Publisher: Princeton University Press
  • ISBN: 9781400835133
  • Category: Political Science
  • Page: 328
  • View: 2629
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Within the realist school of international relations, a prevailing view holds that the anarchic structure of the international system invariably forces the great powers to seek security at one another's expense, dooming even peaceful nations to an unrelenting struggle for power and dominance. Rational Theory of International Politics offers a more nuanced alternative to this view, one that provides answers to the most fundamental and pressing questions of international relations. Why do states sometimes compete and wage war while at other times they cooperate and pursue peace? Does competition reflect pressures generated by the anarchic international system or rather states' own expansionist goals? Are the United States and China on a collision course to war, or is continued coexistence possible? Is peace in the Middle East even feasible? Charles Glaser puts forward a major new theory of international politics that identifies three kinds of variables that influence a state's strategy: the state's motives, specifically whether it is motivated by security concerns or "greed"; material variables, which determine its military capabilities; and information variables, most importantly what the state knows about its adversary's motives. Rational Theory of International Politics demonstrates that variation in motives can be key to the choice of strategy; that the international environment sometimes favors cooperation over competition; and that information variables can be as important as material variables in determining the strategy a state should choose.

Building Trust

Building Trust

Overcoming Suspicion In International Conflict

  • Author: Aaron M. Hoffman
  • Publisher: SUNY Press
  • ISBN: 9780791466353
  • Category: History
  • Page: 213
  • View: 4034
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Challenges conventional assumptions about how international rivals form trusting relationships.

Security Dilemma

Security Dilemma

Fear, Cooperation, and Trust in World Politics

  • Author: Ken Booth,Nicholas Wheeler
  • Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan
  • ISBN: 9780333587447
  • Category: Political Science
  • Page: 272
  • View: 1012
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This major new contribution to the study of internatioal politics provides the first comprehensive analysis of the concept of the "security dilemma," the phrase used to describe the mistrust and fear which is often thought to be the inevitable consequence of living in a world of sovereign states. By exploring the theory and practice of the security dilemma through the prisms of fear, cooperation and trust, it considers whether the security dilemma can be mitigated or even transcended analyzing a wide range of historical and contemporary cases

Trust in International Police and Justice Cooperation

Trust in International Police and Justice Cooperation

  • Author: Saskia Hufnagel,Carole McCartney
  • Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing
  • ISBN: 1509911294
  • Category: Social Science
  • Page: 272
  • View: 4581
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The use of extra-territorial intelligence is growing among security, border, and public agencies. Internationally, rapidly evolving efforts to tackle transnational crime entail the exchange of intelligence across jurisdictions and state borders as well as the 'linking' of law enforcement operations. This book provides a number of different perspectives from across Europe, Australasia and Canada to examine recent cooperation experiences and the challenges faced in practice. The book brings together scholars from a range of legal and criminological fields to examine the legal imperatives and social parameters that shape international police and justice cooperation and highlights the importance of both trust and clear legal rules to ensure effective cooperation. It focuses on areas where cooperation is now mandated, but where significant issues are raised, including the international and regional methods of information and intelligence exchange and challenges to human rights protection; the coordination of international and regional exchange of evidence, such as forensic bioinformation; police cooperation in international investigations and the added value of formalising investigative strategies across jurisdictions regionally and internationally and the operation, accountability and legitimacy of organisations and institutions of 'cooperation' in law enforcement and specific international policing 'missions'.

The Quality of Government

The Quality of Government

Corruption, Social Trust, and Inequality in International Perspective

  • Author: Bo Rothstein
  • Publisher: University of Chicago Press
  • ISBN: 0226729575
  • Category: Business & Economics
  • Page: 285
  • View: 9790
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The relationship between government, virtue, and wealth has held a special fascination since Aristotle, and the importance of each frames policy debates today in both developed and developing countries. While it’s clear that low-quality government institutions have tremendous negative effects on the health and wealth of societies, the criteria for good governance remain far from clear. In this pathbreaking book, leading political scientist Bo Rothstein provides a theoretical foundation for empirical analysis on the connection between the quality of government and important economic, political, and social outcomes. Focusing on the effects of government policies, he argues that unpredictable actions constitute a severe impediment to economic growth and development—and that a basic characteristic of quality government is impartiality in the exercise of power. This is borne out by cross-sectional analyses, experimental studies, and in-depth historical investigations. Timely and topical, The Quality of Government tackles such issues as political legitimacy, social capital, and corruption.

Sorry States

Sorry States

Apologies in International Politics

  • Author: Jennifer Lind
  • Publisher: Cornell University Press
  • ISBN: 9780801476280
  • Category: History
  • Page: 242
  • View: 1603
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Governments increasingly offer or demand apologies for past human rights abuses, and it is widely believed that such expressions of contrition are necessary to promote reconciliation between former adversaries. The post-World War II experiences of Japan and Germany suggest that international apologies have powerful healing effects when they are offered, and poisonous effects when withheld. West Germany made extensive efforts to atone for wartime crimes-formal apologies, monuments to victims of the Nazis, and candid history textbooks; Bonn successfully reconciled with its wartime enemies. By contrast, Tokyo has made few and unsatisfying apologies and approves school textbooks that whitewash wartime atrocities. Japanese leaders worship at the Yasukuni Shrine, which honors war criminals among Japan's war dead. Relations between Japan and its neighbors remain tense. Examining the cases of South Korean relations with Japan and of French relations with Germany, Jennifer Lind demonstrates that denials of past atrocities fuel distrust and inhibit international reconciliation. In Sorry States, she argues that a country's acknowledgment of past misdeeds is essential for promoting trust and reconciliation after war. However, Lind challenges the conventional wisdom by showing that many countries have been able to reconcile without much in the way of apologies or reparations. Contrition can be highly controversial and is likely to cause a domestic backlash that alarms—rather than assuages—outside observers. Apologies and other such polarizing gestures are thus unlikely to soothe relations after conflict, Lind finds, and remembrance that is less accusatory-conducted bilaterally or in multilateral settings-holds the most promise for international reconciliation.

Theories of International Politics and Zombies

Theories of International Politics and Zombies

Revived Edition

  • Author: Daniel W. Drezner
  • Publisher: Princeton University Press
  • ISBN: 1400852285
  • Category: Political Science
  • Page: 216
  • View: 6635
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What would happen to international politics if the dead rose from the grave and started to eat the living? Daniel Drezner's groundbreaking book answers the question that other international relations scholars have been too scared to ask. Addressing timely issues with analytical bite, Drezner looks at how well-known theories from international relations might be applied to a war with zombies. Exploring the plots of popular zombie films, songs, and books, Theories of International Politics and Zombies predicts realistic scenarios for the political stage in the face of a zombie threat and considers how valid—or how rotten—such scenarios might be. This newly revived edition includes substantial updates throughout as well as a new epilogue assessing the role of the zombie analogy in the public sphere.

Critical Approaches to International Security

Critical Approaches to International Security

  • Author: Karin M. Fierke
  • Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
  • ISBN: 1509501673
  • Category: Political Science
  • Page: 320
  • View: 8151
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During the Cold War the concept of international security was understood in military terms as the threat or use of force by states. The end of EastÐWest hostilities, however, brought ‘critical’ perspectives to the fore as scholars sought to explain the emergence of new challenges to international stability, such as environmental degradation, immigration and terrorism. The second edition of this popular and highly respected text offers a wide-ranging and comprehensive analysis of the growing field of critical security studies. All the chapters have been fully revised and updated to map the on-going evolution of debates about international security since 1989, including the more recent shift in emphasis from critiques of the realist practices of states to those of global liberal governance. Topics covered include the relationship between security and change, identity, the production of danger, fear and trauma, human insecurity and emancipation. The book explores the meaning and use of these concepts and their relevance to real-life situations ranging from the War on Terror to the Arab Spring, migration, suffering in war, failed states and state-building, and the changing landscape of the international system, with the emergence of a multipolar world and the escalation of global climate change. Written with verve and clarity and incorporating new seminar activities and questions for class discussion, this book will be an invaluable resource for students of international relations and security studies.

Handbook on Political Trust

Handbook on Political Trust

  • Author: Sonja Zmerli,Tom W.G. van der Meer
  • Publisher: Edward Elgar Publishing
  • ISBN: 1782545115
  • Category:
  • Page: 560
  • View: 9257
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Political trust – in government, parliament, or political parties – has taken centre stage in political science for more than half a century, reflecting ongoing concerns with the legitimacy and functioning of representative democracy. To provide scholars, students and policy makers with a tool to navigate through the complexity of causes and consequences of political trust, this Handbook offers an excellent overview of the conceptual, theoretical, methodological and empirical state of the art, complemented by accounts of regional particularities, and authored by international experts in this field.

The Politics of Expertise

The Politics of Expertise

Competing for Authority in Global Governance

  • Author: Ole Jacob Sending
  • Publisher: University of Michigan Press
  • ISBN: 047211963X
  • Category: Political Science
  • Page: 174
  • View: 8982
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A groundbreaking analysis that sheds new light on global governance

Cyberpolitics in International Relations

Cyberpolitics in International Relations

  • Author: Nazli Choucri
  • Publisher: MIT Press
  • ISBN: 0262517698
  • Category: Computers
  • Page: 311
  • View: 5897
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Cyberspace is widely acknowledged as a fundamental fact of daily life in today'sworld. Until recently, its political impact was thought to be a matter of low politics--backgroundconditions and routine processes and decisions. Now, however, experts have begun to recognize itseffect on high politics--national security, core institutions, and critical decision processes. Inthis book, Nazli Choucri investigates the implications of this new cyberpolitical reality forinternational relations theory, policy, and practice. The ubiquity, fluidity, and anonymity ofcyberspace have already challenged such concepts as leverage and influence, national security anddiplomacy, and borders and boundaries in the traditionally state-centric arena of internationalrelations. Choucri grapples with fundamental questions of how we can take explicit account ofcyberspace in the analysis of world politics and how we can integrate the traditional internationalsystem with its cyber venues. After establishing the theoretical and empiricalterrain, Choucri examines modes of cyber conflict and cyber cooperation in international relations;the potential for the gradual convergence of cyberspace and sustainability, in both substantive andpolicy terms; and the emergent synergy of cyberspace and international efforts toward sustainabledevelopment. Choucri's discussion is theoretically driven and empirically grounded, drawing onrecent data and analyzing the dynamics of cyberpolitics at individual, state, international, andglobal levels. The hardcover edition does not include a dust jacket.

Democracy and Trust

Democracy and Trust

  • Author: Mark E. Warren
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press
  • ISBN: 9780521646871
  • Category: Political Science
  • Page: 370
  • View: 3883
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Surveys suggest an erosion of trust in government, among individuals, and between groups. Although these trends are often thought to be bad for democracy, the relationship between democracy and trust is paradoxical. Trust can develop where interests converge, but in politics interests conflict. Democracy recognizes that politics does not provide a natural terrain for robust trust relations, and so includes a healthy distrust of the interests of others, especially the powerful. Democratic systems institutionalize distrust by providing many opportunities for citizens to oversee those empowered with the public trust. At the same time, trust is a generic social building block of collective action, and for this reason alone democracy cannot do without trust. At a minimum, democratic institutions depend on a trust among citizens sufficient for representation, resistance, and alternative forms of governance. Bringing together social science and political theory, this book provides a valuable exploration of these central issues.