Search Results for "where-the-line-bleeds"

Where the Line Bleeds

Where the Line Bleeds

A Novel

  • Author: Jesmyn Ward
  • Publisher: Simon and Schuster
  • ISBN: 1501164333
  • Category: Fiction
  • Page: 256
  • View: 9473
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"Twin brothers struggle with the responsibilities of adulthood and family in the post-Katrina Mississippi Gulf coast"--Provided by publisher.

Where the Line Bleeds

Where the Line Bleeds

A Novel

  • Author: Jesmyn Ward
  • Publisher: Simon and Schuster
  • ISBN: 1501164341
  • Category: Fiction
  • Page: 256
  • View: 8864
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The first novel from National Book Award winner and author of Sing, Unburied, Sing Jesmyn Ward, a timeless Southern fable of brotherly love and familial conflict—“a lyrical yet clear-eyed portrait of a rural South and an African-American reality that are rarely depicted” (The Boston Globe). Where the Line Bleeds is Jesmyn Ward’s gorgeous first novel and the first of three novels set in Bois Sauvage—followed by Salvage the Bones and Sing, Unburied, Sing—comprising a loose trilogy about small town sourthern family life. Described as “starkly beautiful” (Publishers Weekly, starred review), “fearless” (Essence), and “emotionally honest” (The Dallas Morning News), it was a finalist for the Hurston/Wright Legacy Award and the Virginia Commonwealth University Cabell First Novelist Award. Joshua and Christophe are twins, raised by a blind grandmother and a large extended family in rural Bois Sauvage, on Mississippi’s Gulf Coast. They’ve just finished high school and need to find jobs, but after Katrina, it’s not easy. Joshua gets work on the docks, but Christophe’s not so lucky and starts to sell drugs. Christophe’s downward spiral is accelerated first by crack, then by the reappearance of the twins’ parents: Cille, who left for a better job, and Sandman, a dangerous addict. Sandman taunts Christophe, eventually provoking a shocking confrontation that will ultimately damn or save both twins. Where the Line Bleeds takes place over the course of a single, life-changing summer. It is a delicate and closely observed portrait of fraternal love and strife, of the relentless grind of poverty, of the toll of addiction on a family, and of the bonds that can sustain or torment us. Bois Sauvage, based on Ward’s own hometown, is a character in its own right, as stiflingly hot and as rich with history as it is bereft of opportunity. Ward’s “lushly descriptive prose…and her prodigious talent and fearless portrayal of a world too often overlooked” (Essence) make this novel an essential addition to her incredible body of work.

Where the Line Bleeds

Where the Line Bleeds

  • Author: Jesmyn Ward
  • Publisher: Agate Publishing
  • ISBN: 1932841385
  • Category: Fiction
  • Page: 239
  • View: 2025
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"Twin brothers struggle with the responsibilities of adulthood and family in the post-Katrina Mississippi Gulf coast"--Provided by publisher.

Salvage the Bones

Salvage the Bones

  • Author: Jesmyn Ward
  • Publisher: A&C Black
  • ISBN: 140882700X
  • Category: African American children
  • Page: 258
  • View: 4488
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WINNER OF THE NATIONAL BOOK AWARD 2011

The Fire This Time

The Fire This Time

A New Generation Speaks about Race

  • Author: Jesmyn Ward
  • Publisher: Simon and Schuster
  • ISBN: 1501126369
  • Category: Social Science
  • Page: 240
  • View: 4502
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A surprise New York Times bestseller, these groundbreaking essays and poems about race—collected by National Book Award-winner Jesmyn Ward and written by the most important voices of her generation—are “thoughtful, searing, and at times, hopeful. The Fire This Time is vivid proof that words are important, because of their power to both cleanse and to clarify” (USA TODAY). In this bestselling, widely lauded collection, Jesmyn Ward gathers our most original thinkers and writers to speak on contemporary racism and race, including Carol Anderson, Jericho Brown, Edwidge Danticat, Kevin Young, Claudia Rankine, and Honoree Jeffers. “An absolutely indispensable anthology” (Booklist, starred review), The Fire This Time shines a light on the darkest corners of our history, wrestles with our current predicament, and imagines a better future. Envisioned as a response to The Fire Next Time, James Baldwin’s groundbreaking 1963 essay collection, these contemporary writers reflect on the past, present, and future of race in America. We’ve made significant progress in the fifty-odd years since Baldwin’s essays were published, but America is a long and painful distance away from a “post-racial society”—a truth we must confront if we are to continue to work towards change. Baldwin’s “fire next time” is now upon us, and it needs to be talked about; The Fire This Time “seeks to place the shock of our own times into historical context and, most importantly, to move these times forward” (Vogue).

Men We Reaped

Men We Reaped

A Memoir

  • Author: Jesmyn Ward
  • Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA
  • ISBN: 1608197573
  • Category: Biography & Autobiography
  • Page: 272
  • View: 5835
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Named one of the Best Books of the Century by New York Magazine Two-time National Book Award winner Jesmyn Ward (Salvage the Bones, Sing, Unburied, Sing) contends with the deaths of five young men dear to her, and the risk of being a black man in the rural South. “We saw the lightning and that was the guns; and then we heard the thunder and that was the big guns; and then we heard the rain falling and that was the blood falling; and when we came to get in the crops, it was dead men that we reaped.” -Harriet Tubman In five years, Jesmyn Ward lost five young men in her life-to drugs, accidents, suicide, and the bad luck that can follow people who live in poverty, particularly black men. Dealing with these losses, one after another, made Jesmyn ask the question: Why? And as she began to write about the experience of living through all the dying, she realized the truth-and it took her breath away. Her brother and her friends all died because of who they were and where they were from, because they lived with a history of racism and economic struggle that fostered drug addiction and the dissolution of family and relationships. Jesmyn says the answer was so obvious she felt stupid for not seeing it. But it nagged at her until she knew she had to write about her community, to write their stories and her own. Jesmyn grew up in poverty in rural Mississippi. She writes powerfully about the pressures this brings, on the men who can do no right and the women who stand in for family in a society where the men are often absent. She bravely tells her story, revisiting the agonizing losses of her only brother and her friends. As the sole member of her family to leave home and pursue higher education, she writes about this parallel American universe with the objectivity distance provides and the intimacy of utter familiarity. A brutal world rendered beautifully, Jesmyn Ward's memoir will sit comfortably alongside Edwidge Danticat's Brother, I'm Dying, Tobias Wolff's This Boy's Life, and Maya Angelou's I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings.

Sing, Unburied, Sing

Sing, Unburied, Sing

A Novel

  • Author: Jesmyn Ward
  • Publisher: Simon and Schuster
  • ISBN: 1501126091
  • Category: Fiction
  • Page: 304
  • View: 5121
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WINNER of the NATIONAL BOOK AWARD and A NEW YORK TIMES TOP 10 BEST BOOK OF THE YEAR A finalist for the Kirkus Prize, Andrew Carnegie Medal, Aspen Words Literary Prize, and a New York Times bestseller, this majestic, stirring, and widely praised novel from two-time National Book Award winner Jesmyn Ward, the story of a family on a journey through rural Mississippi, is a “tour de force” (O, the Oprah Magazine) and a timeless work of fiction that is destined to become a classic. Jesmyn Ward’s historic second National Book Award–winner is “perfectly poised for the moment” (The New York Times), an intimate portrait of three generations of a family and an epic tale of hope and struggle. “Ward’s writing throbs with life, grief, and love… this book is the kind that makes you ache to return to it” (Buzzfeed). Jojo is thirteen years old and trying to understand what it means to be a man. He doesn’t lack in fathers to study, chief among them his Black grandfather, Pop. But there are other men who complicate his understanding: his absent White father, Michael, who is being released from prison; his absent White grandfather, Big Joseph, who won’t acknowledge his existence; and the memories of his dead uncle, Given, who died as a teenager. His mother, Leonie, is an inconsistent presence in his and his toddler sister’s lives. She is an imperfect mother in constant conflict with herself and those around her. She is Black and her children’s father is White. She wants to be a better mother but can’t put her children above her own needs, especially her drug use. Simultaneously tormented and comforted by visions of her dead brother, which only come to her when she’s high, Leonie is embattled in ways that reflect the brutal reality of her circumstances. When the children’s father is released from prison, Leonie packs her kids and a friend into her car and drives north to the heart of Mississippi and Parchman Farm, the State Penitentiary. At Parchman, there is another thirteen-year-old boy, the ghost of a dead inmate who carries all of the ugly history of the South with him in his wandering. He too has something to teach Jojo about fathers and sons, about legacies, about violence, about love. Rich with Ward’s distinctive, lyrical language, Sing, Unburied, Sing is a majestic and unforgettable family story and “an odyssey through rural Mississippi’s past and present” (The Philadelphia Inquirer).

The Wren Hunt

The Wren Hunt

  • Author: Mary Watson
  • Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing
  • ISBN: 1408884941
  • Category: Young Adult Fiction
  • Page: 432
  • View: 6135
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Every year on St Stephen's Day, Wren Silke is chased through the forest in a warped version of a childhood game. Her pursuers are judges – a group of powerful and frightening boys who know nothing of her true identity. If they knew she was an augur – their sworn enemy – the game would be up. This year, the tension between judges and augurs is at breaking point. Wren's survival, and that of her family, depends on her becoming a spy in the midst of these boys she fears most and using her talent, her magic, to steal from them the only thing that can restore her family's former power for good. But Wren's talent comes with a price. The more she uses it, the more she loses her grip on reality and soon she's questioning everything she's ever known about her family, about augurs and judges, and about the dangerous tattooed stranger who most definitely is not on her side ...

Long Division

Long Division

  • Author: Kiese Laymon
  • Publisher: Agate Publishing
  • ISBN: 1572847182
  • Category: Fiction
  • Page: 276
  • View: 9415
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Long Division includes two distinct but tightly interwoven stories--one called "All Things Considered," the other "Long Division." In the first, it's March 2012: 14-year-old Citoyen "City" Coldson and his nemesis, LaVander Peeler, become the first black male duo to win the state of Mississippi's “Can You Use This Word in a Sentence” contest finals. Both boys are asked to represent Mississippi at the televised national competition. (Hours before the contest begins, City is given a book without an author called "Long Division.") Turmoil and misunderstanding ensue, as City and LaVander learn they have reason to doubt the merit of their presence at the contest. “They want us to win,” City says to LaVander moments before the contest starts. After being assigned, and then misusing, the word “niggardly” in the first round of the contest, City has a remarkable on-stage meltdown in front of a national television audience. LaVander, on the other hand, though incredibly shaken, advances to the finals and has the chance to win the contest. The day after the contest, City is sent to spend the weekend with his grandmother in the small coastal community of Melahatchie, which is also the site of the mysterious disappearance of girl named Baize Shephard. Baize Shephard also happens to be one of the main characters in the book "Long Division," which City has been dipping into throughout the story. While in Melahatchie, City's troubled Uncle Relle reveals that City has become an overnight YouTube celebrity thanks to his on-stage meltdown, and that he is being sought to appear on a new television show called "Youtube’s Black Reality All Stars." City is alternately celebrated and ridiculed by the white and black residents of Melahatchie as a result of his performance at the contest, even as he delves deeper into "Long Division" and its story of the missing Baize Shephard. When the neighborhood is convinced that a white man nicknamed Pot-Belly has assaulted Baize and done away with her body, they beat the man to death...or so City thinks, until he finds the man alive, chained up in a workshed in the back yard of his grandmother’s house. City visits the imprisoned white man four times during the course of his weekend--reading to him from "Long Division," asking him questions he's always wanted to ask white people, and promising to save him if he survives his own baptism, which his grandmother has engineered during City's visit. When LaVander appears, he and City must reluctantly work together again, this time to save the life of the white man chained in the workshed--and quite possibly the life of City’s grandmother, too. There's something else that City finds especially interesting about "Long Division," besides the story of Baize: another main character in the book is also named City Coldson--except this City Coldson, who lives in Melahatchie, is 14 in 1985. This City will do anything to make Shalaya Crump love him--including traveling 26 years into the future (via a time portal they find in the woods) to steal a laptop and cellphone from a girl--a mysterious teenaged rapper named Baize Shephard, who lost her parents in Hurricane Katrina. The following day, Shalaya and City meet another worn down time-traveler, this one from 1964, a boy named "Jewish" Evan Altshuler. Evan is desperate to protect his family against the Klu Klux Klan during Freedom Summer. He convinces Shalaya that he can help her find her parents and her future self if she brings the laptop computer back to 1964 and does him a favor. Unexpectedly, City and Shalaya become separated, with Shalaya stuck in 1964 and City stuck in 2012. In their wanderings back and forward through time, much is revealed about City’s relationship with Baize, and about segregation, Freedom Summer, the destruction wrought by Hurricane Katrina and the Gulf Oil spill, and the limits of technology and love. Long Division is a Twain-esque exploration of celebrity, authorship, racialized terror, neo-liberalism, religion, and coming of age in Post-Katrina Mississippi.

The Murders of Molly Southbourne

The Murders of Molly Southbourne

  • Author: Tade Thompson
  • Publisher: Macmillan
  • ISBN: 0765397129
  • Category: Fiction
  • Page: 128
  • View: 8014
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"A bold outpouring of flesh and crisis at once horrifying and familiar." —The New York Times Every time she bleeds a murderer is born. Experience the horror of Tade Thompson's The Murders of Molly Southbourne. A finalist for the 2017 BSFA Award. The rule is simple: don’t bleed. For as long as Molly Southbourne can remember, she’s been watching herself die. Whenever she bleeds, another molly is born, identical to her in every way and intent on her destruction. Molly knows every way to kill herself, but she also knows that as long as she survives she’ll be hunted. No matter how well she follows the rules, eventually the mollys will find her. Can Molly find a way to stop the tide of blood, or will she meet her end at the hand of a girl who looks just like her? At the Publisher's request, this title is being sold without Digital Rights Management Software (DRM) applied.

Memoir from Antproof Case

Memoir from Antproof Case

  • Author: Mark Helprin
  • Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
  • ISBN: 0547542038
  • Category: Fiction
  • Page: 528
  • View: 5270
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An old American who lives in Brazil is writing his memoirs. An English teacher at the naval academy, he is married to a woman young enough to be his daughter and has a little son whom he loves. He sits in a mountain garden in Niterói, overlooking the ocean. As he reminisces and writes, placing the pages carefully in his antproof case, we learn that he was a World War II ace who was shot down twice, an investment banker who met with popes and presidents, and a man who was never not in love. He was the thief of the century, a murderer, and a protector of the innocent. And all his life he waged a valiant, losing, one-man battle against the world’s most insidious enslaver: coffee. Mark Helprin combines adventure, satire, flights of transcendence, and high comedy in this "memoir" of a man whose life reads like the song of the twentieth century.

All That Bleeds

All That Bleeds

  • Author: Kimberly Frost
  • Publisher: Penguin
  • ISBN: 1101553871
  • Category: Fiction
  • Page: 336
  • View: 1491
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As the last heiress of the House of North, Alissa knows that striking up a secret friendship with a half-vampire enforcer is dangerous, but Merrick is a temptation she can't resist. But when Alissa is kidnapped, Merrick proves that he will do anything to protect the woman who tempts him with her very existence.

Why We Write about Ourselves

Why We Write about Ourselves

Twenty Memoirists on why They Expose Themselves (and Others) in the Name of Literature

  • Author: Meredith Maran
  • Publisher: Plume
  • ISBN: 0142181978
  • Category: REFERENCE
  • Page: 254
  • View: 5730
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For the many amateurs and professionals who write about themselves - bloggers, journal-keepers, aspiring essayists and memoirists - this book offers inspiration, encouragement and pithy, practical advice. Twenty of America's bestselling memoirists share their innermost thoughts and hard-earned tips with veteran author Meredith Maran, revealing what drives them to tell their personal stories, and the nuts and bolts of how they do it. With contributions from Edwidge Danticatt, A.M. Homes, Sue Monk Kidd, Edmund White and many more.

Pass Christian

Pass Christian

  • Author: Dan Ellis
  • Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
  • ISBN: 9780738513607
  • Category: History
  • Page: 128
  • View: 1759
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A peninsular community nourished by the enchanting waters of Mississippi's Gulf Coast, Pass Christian is a favorite tourist destination for thousands of visitors, a treasure trove of architectural gems, and a colorful infusion of American and European cultures. In stately antebellum homes on streets lined with majestic live oaks, Pass Christian's treasured heritage lingers like the balmy gulf breezes. Unlike towns stripped of character in the evolving modernization of America, this is a community where preservation is tantamount to progress. With a six-mile frontage on the Gulf Coast, the town has essentially contained itself within its current city limits for more than 100 years. "The Pass" became one of the early port towns to have schooner access to New Orleans, and many of this city's residents adopted the Pass as a second home in a lifestyle that has prevailed for the past 150 years. The vintage photographs in this collection portray a wide variety of local landmarks, notable citizens, grand homes, and memorable events in Pass Christian's celebrated history. Coupled with informative captions, these snapshot glimpses into the past will evoke fond memories among those who have lived and worked in this coastal community while beckoning newcomers to explore one of the Magnolia State's greatest treasures.

The Count of Concord

The Count of Concord

A Novel

  • Author: Nicholas Delbanco
  • Publisher: Dalkey Archive Press
  • ISBN: 1564785092
  • Category: Fiction
  • Page: 478
  • View: 5760
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Narrated by the count's last-surviving relative, Sally Ormsby Thompson Robinson, a fictional portrait of Benjamin Thompson, Count Rumford, describes the eclectic and distinguished career of the eighteenth-century politician, spy, philanthropist, and scientist. Simultaneous.

The City Bleeds Gold

The City Bleeds Gold

  • Author: Lucy Saxon
  • Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing
  • ISBN: 1408847728
  • Category: Juvenile Fiction
  • Page: 368
  • View: 5636
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In this twist-filled fantasy adventure set in the world of Take Back the Skies and The Almost King, a young man must choose between two faces: dangerous master of shadows or beloved of the future queen. Noah is the finest mask-maker in all of Erova. He is responsible and loyal, and has won the heart and hand of the future queen. Daniel is dangerous and daring. Infamous. He prowls the filthy rooftops of the maze-like lower city in search of secrets and crime. Its people, hungry and forgotten, have come to need him. Noah and Daniel are the same person, and Daniel's life is beginning to tangle with Noah's, ensnaring the people he loves in a complex web of deception and heartbreak that will become deadly unless Noah can decide once and for all who he really wants to be.

The Night the New Jesus Fell to Earth

The Night the New Jesus Fell to Earth

And Other Stories from Cliffside, North Carolina

  • Author: Ron Rash
  • Publisher: Univ of South Carolina Press
  • ISBN: 1611175151
  • Category: Fiction
  • Page: 168
  • View: 1286
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The Night the New Jesus Fell to Earth was originally released in 1994 and was the first published book from acclaimed writer Ron Rash. This twentieth anniversary edition takes us back to where it all began with ten linked short stories, framed like a novel, introducing us to a trio of memorable narrators—Tracy, Randy, and Vincent—making their way against the hardscrabble backdrop of the North Carolina foothills. With a comedic touch that may surprise readers familiar only with Rash's later, darker fiction, these earnest tales reveal the hard lessons of good whiskey, bad marriages, weak foundations, familial legacies, questionable religious observances, and the dubious merits of possum breeding, as well as the hard-won reconciliations with self, others, and home that can be garnered only in good time. The Night the New Jesus Fell to Earth shows us the promising beginnings of a master storyteller honing his craft and contributing from the start to the fine traditions of southern fiction and lore. This Southern Revivals edition includes a new introduction from the author and a contextualizing preface from series editor Robert H. Brinkmeyer, director of the University of South Carolina Institute for Southern Studies.

The Tree That Bleeds

The Tree That Bleeds

A Uighur Town on the Edge

  • Author: Nick Holdstock
  • Publisher: Luath Press Ltd
  • ISBN: 1909912328
  • Category: Social Science
  • Page: 356
  • View: 926
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In 1997 a small town in a remote part of China was shaken by violent protests that led to the imposition of martial law. Some said it was a peaceful demonstration that was brutally suppressed by the government; others that it was an act of terrorism. When Nick Holdstock arrived in 2001, the town was still bitterly divided.BACK COVER: 'There is still much that is unclear about what actually happened during that violent week in July 2009. But however terrible its cost - whether it was a massacre of peaceful protestors, an orchestrated episode of violence, or something in between - it was not without precedent.' NICK HOLDSTOCK In 1997 a small town in a remote part of China was shaken by violent protests that led to the imposition of martial law. Some said it was a peaceful demonstration that was brutally suppressed by the government; others that it was an act of terrorism. When Nick Holdstock arrived in 2001, the town was still bitterly divided. The main resentment was between the Uighurs (an ethnic minority in the region) and the Han (the ethnic majority in China). While living in Xinjiang, Holdstock was confronted with the political, economic and religious sources of conflict between these different communities, which would later result in the terrible violence of July 2009, when hundreds died in further riots in the region. The Tree that Bleeds is a book about what happens when people stop believing their government will listen.

The Bleeds

The Bleeds

A Novel

  • Author: Dimitri Nasrallah
  • Publisher: Esplanade Books
  • ISBN: 9781550654806
  • Category:
  • Page: 224
  • View: 6669
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From the author of the widely acclaimed Niko comes a fresh take on the political thriller, an allegory of power and privilege resurrected from the thwarted ideals of the Arab Spring. In The Bleeds, Nasrallah overturns the conventions of the political novel to focus on the corroded luxury and power structures framing the lives of those most affected by war and insurrection. For half a century, the Bleeds have ruled with an iron fist. Once hailed as the founders of an independence movement, they've long since cemented into corrupt autocrats upheld by the foreign investors who manage their region's uranium trade. The aging Mustafa Bleed orchestrated the election of his son, Vadim, but Vadim's first term has proven he's more interested in the casinos of Monaco than his new role as leader. Now that an election has set the stage for revolt, opposition leaders, foreign diplomats, and journalists are fomenting a revolution against the Bleeds. All the while, father and son grapple with bonds of love, loyalty, betrayal, and paranoia. Dimitri Nasrallah's second novel, Niko, was nominated for CBC's Canada Reads and the International IMPAC Dublin Literary Award, and has been published in four languages. His debut, Blackbodying, won the McAuslan First Book Prize. He lives in Montreal, where he teaches creative writing at Concordia University.

The Life Before Her Eyes

The Life Before Her Eyes

A Novel

  • Author: Laura Kasischke
  • Publisher: HMH
  • ISBN: 9780547541457
  • Category: Fiction
  • Page: 288
  • View: 7449
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A “hauntingly original” psychological thriller about innocence, memory, and the effect of a moment of violence (O: The Oprah Magazine). In the girls’ bathroom, Diana and her best friend, Maureen, are stealing a moment from the routine drudgery of high school when a classmate enters holding a gun. Suddenly, Diana sees her life—past, present, and acutely imagined future—dance before her eyes. Through prose infused with the dramatically feminine sensuality of spring, readers will experience sixteen-year-old Diana’s uncertain steps into womanhood—her awkward, heated forays into sex; her fresh, fragile construction of an identity—and, in exhilarating detail, her life-not-lived as a doting mother and wife of forty. Together with the sights and sounds of renewal are the tasks of Diana’s adulthood: protecting her beloved daughter and holding on to her successful husband. This “poetic” novel encompasses both the truth of a teenager’s world and the transformations of midlife (Vanity Fair). Resonant and deeply stirring, The Life Before Her Eyes finds piercing beauty in the midst of a nightmare that echoes like a dirge beneath each new spring, in a story that “takes on deep matters of life and death; conscience and consciousness; family, love and friendship” (Los Angeles Times). “Evokes terror and redemption, shadows and light. Kasischke treads a delicate line with the precision and confidence of a tightrope walker. She reminds us to look hard at life, to notice its beauty and cruelty, even as it flashes before us and disappears.” —The New York Times “Mesmerizing.” —Chicago Tribune