Search results for: a-greek-roman-empire

A Greek Roman Empire

Author : Fergus Millar
File Size : 89.88 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Download : 181
Read : 214
Download »
"This masterful study will have its place on every ancient historian's bookshelf."—Claudia Rapp, author of Holy Bishops in Late Antiquity: The Nature of Christian Leadership in an Age of Transition

A Greek Roman Empire

Author : Fergus Millar
File Size : 70.25 MB
Format : PDF, ePub
Download : 686
Read : 604
Download »
"This masterful study will have its place on every ancient historian's bookshelf."—Claudia Rapp, author of Holy Bishops in Late Antiquity: The Nature of Christian Leadership in an Age of Transition

Aspects of Orality and Greek Literature in the Roman Empire

Author : Consuelo Ruiz-Montero
File Size : 84.85 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Docs
Download : 576
Read : 881
Download »
Orality was the backbone of ancient Greek culture throughout its different periods. This volume will serve to deepen the reader’s knowledge of how Greek texts circulated during the Roman Empire. The studies included here approach the subject from both a literary and a sociocultural point of view, illuminating the interconnections between literary and social practices. Topics considered include epigraphy, the rhetoric of transmitting the texts, language and speech, performance, theatre, narrative representation, material culture, and the interaction of different cultures. Since orality is a widespread phenomenon in the Greek-speaking world of the Roman Empire, this book draws the reader’s attention to under-researched texts and inscriptions.

Rome the Greek World and the East Government society and culture in the Roman Empire

Author : Fergus Millar
File Size : 53.23 MB
Format : PDF, ePub
Download : 755
Read : 939
Download »
This second volume in the three-volume series includes essays by Fergus Millar which explore the role of the emperor and the functions of the Roman Empire's treasury, courts, penal system, and equestrian civil service in the first three centuries A.D. Other essays deal with the Roman citizenry, paying particular attention to the cultural exchange between Rome and Greece.

Greek Literature and the Roman Empire

Author : E P Warren Praelector and Tutorial Fellow in Grek Tim Whitmarsh
File Size : 85.30 MB
Format : PDF, ePub
Download : 595
Read : 270
Download »
Their authors' rich and complex engagement with the literary past articulates an ingenious and sophisticated response to their present socio-political circumstances. This book is written for those interested in the history of identity and imperialism as well as scholars of classical literature and society. All Greek and Latin is translated."--BOOK JACKET.

Greek and Latin Literature of the Roman Empire

Author : Albrecht Dihle
File Size : 29.91 MB
Format : PDF, ePub
Download : 267
Read : 565
Download »
Professor Dihle sees the Greek and Latin literature between the 1st century B.C. and the 6th century A.D. as an organic progression. He builds on Schlegel's observation that art, customs and political life in classical antiquity are inextricably entwined and therefore should not be examined separately. Dihle does not simply consider narrowly defined `literature', but all works of cultural socio-historical significance, including Jewish and Christian literature, philosophy and science. Despite this, major authors like Seneca, Tacitus and Plotinus are considered individually. This work is an authoritative yet personal presentation of seven hundred years of literature.

The Oxford Handbook of Greek and Roman Comedy

Author : Michael Fontaine
File Size : 90.13 MB
Format : PDF, Mobi
Download : 602
Read : 944
Download »
The Oxford Handbook of Greek and Roman Comedy marks the first comprehensive introduction to and reference work for the unified study of ancient comedy. From its birth in Greece to its end in Rome, from its Hellenistic to its Imperial receptions, no topic is neglected. The 41 essays offer cutting-edge guides through comedy's immense terrain.

Studies in Ancient Greek and Roman Society

Author : Robin Osborne
File Size : 45.44 MB
Format : PDF, Kindle
Download : 828
Read : 619
Download »
A collection of innovative essays on major topics in ancient Greece and Rome, first published in 2004.

Greek Literature and the Roman Empire

Author : Tim Whitmarsh
File Size : 20.53 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Docs
Download : 241
Read : 1133
Download »
Greek Literature and the Roman Empire uses up-to-date literary and cultural theory to make a major and original contribution to the appreciation of Greek literature written under the Roman Empire during the second century CE (the so-called 'Second Sophistic'). This literature should not be dismissed as unoriginal and mediocre. Rather, its central preoccupations, especially mimesis and paideia, provide significant insights into the definition of Greek identity during the period. Focusing upon a series of key texts by important authors (including Dio Chrysostom, Plutarch, Philostratus, Lucian, Favorinus, and the novelists), Whitmarsh argues that narratives telling of educated Greeks' philosophical advice to empowered Romans (including emperors) offer a crucial point of entry into the complex and often ambivalent relationships between Roman conquerors and Greek subjects. Their authors' rich and complex engagement with the literary past articulates an ingenious and sophisticated response to their present socio-political circumstances.

Greek Romans and Roman Greeks

Author : Erik Nis Ostenfeld
File Size : 46.52 MB
Format : PDF, Mobi
Download : 802
Read : 1057
Download »
In its first three centuries the Roman Empire expanded politically at the same time as Greek culture was enjoying its heyday. This not only created tensions but also many productive impulses, which were mirrored in different branches of cultural life. In this collection of papers an assembled team of international scholars from the fields of philosophy, history of ideas, literature, epigraphy, archaeology and history explores the intercultural aspects of that thriving period. Lisa Nevett's paper "Continuity and change in Greek households under Roman rule - the role of women in the domestic context" looks at the extent to which individual households and especially attitudes to women changed under Roman control. her evidence of patterns of social behaviour is archaeological and she concludes that a relaxation of restrictions on women took place from the later Hellenistic period onwards and therefore was a development which had begun prior to the arrival of the Romans. Paolo Desideri surveys Greek historiographical literature of the second century AD to find a key to Greek mentality and political ideology in the late Roman Empire. The Greeks did not have to give up their civilisation and identity; Appian and Cassius Dio even created the idea of a Hellenistic rather than a Roman Empire. Philip Stadter in "Plutarch's Lives and their Roman Readers" argues that Plutarch in "Lives is counselling the elite class of the Roman Empire, and that Tiberius Gracchus in particular would have provided a useful lesson, e.g. for the emperor Hadrian. Ewen Bowie explores the literary tales of Hadrian in Latin and particularly Greek poetry, including ancient sources for his preferences, his own compositions and some of the poems composed by the friends of ministers. Hadrian seems to have preferred Antimaches over Homer, admired Archilochus, Parthenius and short polymetric compositions.

The Cambridge History of Greek and Roman Warfare

Author : Philip Sabin
File Size : 49.70 MB
Format : PDF, Mobi
Download : 933
Read : 585
Download »
Second volume of a systematic and up-to-date account of Roman warfare from the Late Republic to Justinian.

Ancient Greek and Roman Slavery

Author : Peter Hunt
File Size : 76.60 MB
Format : PDF
Download : 124
Read : 784
Download »
"The general introduction will provide the political and historical context for Greek and Roman slavery and briefly survey the institutions themselves. Each chapter will open with a section on "Background and Methodology." These will orient the reader for the chapter's "Case Studies," one from Greece and one from Rome--and sometimes a Hellenistic case--that would constitute the bulk of the book"--

The Slave Systems of Greek and Roman Antiquity

Author : William Linn Westermann
File Size : 49.87 MB
Format : PDF, ePub
Download : 303
Read : 630
Download »

Greek Epigram in the Roman Empire

Author : Gideon Nisbet
File Size : 62.78 MB
Format : PDF, Mobi
Download : 537
Read : 325
Download »
Table of contents

Greek and Roman Networks in the Mediterranean

Author : Irad Malkin
File Size : 25.18 MB
Format : PDF
Download : 602
Read : 1071
Download »
How useful is the concept of "network" for historical studies and the ancient world in particular? Using theoretical models of social network analysis, this book illuminates aspects of the economic, social, religious, and political history of the ancient Greek and Roman worlds. Bringing together some of the most active and prominent researchers in ancient history, this book moves beyond political institutions, ethnic, and geographical boundaries in order to observe the ancient Mediterranean through a perspective of network interaction. It employs a wide range of approaches, and to examine relationships and interactions among various social entities in the Mediterranean. Chronologically, the book extends from the early Iron Age to the late Antique world, covering the Mediterranean between Antioch in the east to Massalia (Marseilles) in the west. This book was published as two special issues in Mediterranean Historical Review.

Mosaics of the Greek and Roman World

Author : Katherine Dunbabin
File Size : 26.29 MB
Format : PDF, ePub
Download : 364
Read : 1305
Download »
This book provides a comprehensive account of mosaics in the ancient world from the early pebble mosaics of Greece to the pavements of Christian churches in the East. Separate chapters in Part I cover the principal regions of the Roman Empire in turn, in order to bring out the distinctive characteristics of their mosaic workshops. Questions of technique and production, of the role of mosaics in architecture, and of their social functions and implications are treated in Part II. The book discusses both well-known works and recent finds, and balances consideration of exceptional masterpieces against standard workshop production. Two main lines of approach are followed throughout: first, the role of mosaics as a significant art form, which over an unbroken span illuminates the evolution of pictorial style better than any comparable surviving medium; and secondly, their character as works of artisan production closely linked to their architectural context.

Athenian Comedy in the Roman Empire

Author : C. W. Marshall
File Size : 20.63 MB
Format : PDF, Docs
Download : 248
Read : 414
Download »
Athenian comedy is firmly entrenched in the classical canon, but imperial authors debated, dissected and redirected comic texts, plots and language of Aristophanes, Menander, and their rivals in ways that reflect the non-Athenocentric, pan-Mediterranean performance culture of the imperial era. Although the reception of tragedy beyond its own contemporary era has been studied, the legacy of Athenian comedy in the Roman world is less well understood. This volume offers the first expansive treatment of the reception of Athenian comedy in the Roman Empire. These engaged and engaging studies examine the lasting impact of classical Athenian comic drama. Demonstrating a variety of methodologies and scholarly perspectives, sources discussed include papyri, mosaics, stage history, epigraphy and a broad range of literature such as dramatic works in Latin and Greek, including verse satire, essays, and epistolary fiction.

Greek Literature in the Roman Empire

Author : Jason Konig
File Size : 36.8 MB
Format : PDF, Kindle
Download : 689
Read : 567
Download »
In this book Jason Konig offers for the first time an accessible yet comprehensive account of the multi-faceted Greek literature of the Roman Empire, focusing especially on the first three centuries AD. He covers in turn the Greek novels of this period, the satirical writing of Lucian, rhetoric, philosophy, scientific and miscellanistic writing, geography and history, biography and poetry, providing a vivid introduction to key texts, with extensive quotation in translation. The challenges and pleasures these texts offer to their readers have come to be newly appreciated in the classical scholarship of the last two or three decades. In addition there has been renewed interest in the role played by novelistic and rhetorical writing in the Greek culture of the Roman Empire more broadly, and in the many different ways in which these texts respond to the world around them. This volume offers a broad introduction to those exciting developments.

Frankness Greek Culture and the Roman Empire

Author : Dana Fields
File Size : 27.35 MB
Format : PDF, Mobi
Download : 786
Read : 533
Download »
Frankness, Greek Culture, and the Roman Empire discusses the significance of parrhēsia (free and frank speech) in Greek culture of the Roman empire. The term parrhēsia first emerged in the context of the classical Athenian democracy and was long considered a key democratic and egalitarian value. And yet, references to frank speech pervade the literature of the Roman empire, a time when a single autocrat ruled over most of the known world, Greek cities were governed at the local level by entrenched oligarchies, and social hierarchy was becomingly increasingly stratified. This volume challenges the traditional view that the meaning of the term changed radically after Alexander the Great, and rather shows that parrhēsia retained both political and ethical significance well into the Roman empire. By examining references to frankness in political writings, rhetoric, philosophy, historiography, biographical literature, and finally satire, the volume also explores the dynamics of political power in the Roman empire, where politics was located in interpersonal relationships as much as, if not more than, in institutions. The contested nature of the power relations in such interactions - between emperors and their advisors, between orators and the cities they counseled, and among fellow members of the oligarchic elite in provincial cities - reveals the political implications of a prominent post-classical intellectual development that reconceptualizes true freedom as belonging to the man who behaves - and speaks - freely. At the same time, because the role of frank speaker is valorized, those who claim it also lay themselves open to suspicions of self-promotion and hypocrisy. This volume will be of interest to students and scholars of rhetoric and political thought in the ancient world, and to anyone interested in ongoing debates about intellectual freedom, limits on speech, and the advantages of presenting oneself as a truth-teller.

Performance in Greek and Roman Theatre

Author : George William Mallory Harrison
File Size : 22.3 MB
Format : PDF, Docs
Download : 901
Read : 240
Download »
This series has existed for the past 50 years. It provides a forum for the publication of well over 300 scholarly works on all aspects of the ancient world, including inscriptions, papyri, language, the history of material culture and mentality, the history of peoples and institutions, but also latterly the classical tradition, for example, neo-latin literature and the history of Classical scholarship.