Search Results for "a-short-ride-in-the-jungle"

A Short Ride in the Jungle

A Short Ride in the Jungle

The Ho Chi Minh Trail by Motorcycle

  • Author: Antonia Bolingbroke-Kent
  • Publisher: Lost Classics Book Company
  • ISBN: 9781890623487
  • Category: History
  • Page: 384
  • View: 1968
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This is not only the thrilling tale of a daring adventure on an aging motorcycle; it is also the story of Southeast Asia s legendary Ho Chi Minh Trail, and of a war, the effects of which can still be seen across the region and in the hearts of not only its people but of the many Americans whose lives were touched forever by it. Follow Antonia as she retraces the footsteps and tank tracks of this famous supply line through the mountains and jungles of Vietnam, Laos, and Cambodia. Alone on a diminutive pink motorcycle, she encounters bomb craters, unexploded ordnance, mud, mountains, jungle, disappointment, and triumph and almost without fail, cheerful and generous people along her path."

Igloos in the Jungle

Igloos in the Jungle

Memoirs of a Tactical Airlifter in Vietnam and Beyond

  • Author: Brian Watson
  • Publisher: Xlibris Corporation
  • ISBN: 1469159376
  • Category: Biography & Autobiography
  • Page: 385
  • View: 7034
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Go along with the Colonel on this nostalgic trip back to the 1950's and life growing up in the Midwest. Follow him on his solo trek across Europe and the year that made him a man in the Aviation Cadet Program. Next it's many a day in Vietnam over the course of the war and the hardships faced by the aviators and their families on a daily basis. Life in the "fast lane" or five years in the Pentagon gives the reader a close look at the many challenges faced by the Staff Officer in the "building". Finally, the harrowing experience of life in a high school classroom for 19 years caps off the interesting adventure. Lt. Col. Watson amassed almost 5,000 hours flight time with 1,300 of it being combat time in Vietnam. He was "in country" for over 500 days covering parts of 1965,1966,1968,1969,1970,1971,1972, and 1973.He was decorated 39 times including the Legion of Merit, the Distinguished Flying Cross, the Defense Meritorious Service Medal, 12 Air Medals, 2 Commendations Medals, and the Vietnam Cross of Gallantry just to mention a few. His travels took him north of the Arctic Circle to the southernmost tip of South America, all over Europe and the Far East with stops in 68 countries on 6 continents. Sit back, relax, and enjoy this most interesting story of an Air Force Officer and his travels in support of our national interests.

Life in the Rainforest

Life in the Rainforest

  • Author: Edward P. Ortleb
  • Publisher: Lorenz Educational Press
  • ISBN: 0787703028
  • Category: Nature
  • Page: 32
  • View: 2864
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Color Overheads Included! The information contained in this resource and activity book follows a learning cycle that includes: a) free exploration by the students; b) expansion of exploration through activities that allow children to test, integrate, and sort out their discoveries; and c) application of concepts through individual and group projects which provide students with the opportunity to enhance and share what they have learned. Each section includes teacher resource material, planned lessons, and expansion activities. Students will examine various items, books, and resources. The display table's contents of fruits, nuts, woods, and other rainforest items will pique students' interest.

The Gentleman In The Parlour

The Gentleman In The Parlour

  • Author: W. Somerset Maugham
  • Publisher: Random House
  • ISBN: 1409088022
  • Category: Travel
  • Page: 240
  • View: 7264
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WITH AN INTRODUCTION BY PAUL THEROUX Somerset Maugham's success as a writer enabled him to indulge his adventurous love of travel, and he recorded the sights and sounds of his wide-ranging journeys with an urbane, wry style all his own. The Gentleman in the Parlour is an account of the author's trip through what was then Burma and Siam, ending in Haiphong, Vietnam. Whether by river to Mandalay, on horse through the mountains and forests of the Shan States to Bangkok, or onwards by sea, Maugham's vivid descriptions bring a lost world to life.

The Jungle

The Jungle

  • Author: Upton Sinclair
  • Publisher: OUP USA
  • ISBN: 0191624918
  • Category: Fiction
  • Page: 384
  • View: 8809
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A searing novel of social realism, Upton Sinclair's The Jungle follows the fortunes of Jurgis Rudkus, an immigrant who finds in the stockyards of turn-of-the-century Chicago a ruthless system that degrades and impoverishes him, and an industry whose filthy practices contaminate the meat it processes. From the stench of the killing-beds to the horrors of the fertilizer-works, the appalling conditions in which Jurgis works are described in intense detail by an author bent on social reform. So powerful was the book's message that it caught the eye of President Theodore Roosevelt and led to changes to the food hygiene laws. In his Introduction to this new edition, Russ Castronovo highlights the aesthetic concerns that were central to Sinclair's aspirations, examining the relationship between history and historical fiction, and between the documentary impulse and literary narrative. As he examines the book's disputed status as novel (it is propaganda or literature?), he reveals why Sinclair's message-driven fiction has relevance to literary and historical matters today, now more than a hundred years after the novel first appeared in print.

To Soar with the Tigers, The Life and Diary of Flying Tiger, Robert Brouk

To Soar with the Tigers, The Life and Diary of Flying Tiger, Robert Brouk

  • Author: Jennifer Holik-Urban
  • Publisher: Lulu.com
  • ISBN: 0557902541
  • Category:
  • Page: N.A
  • View: 7402
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The Journal [afterw.] The Madras journal of literature and science, ed. by J.C. Morris

The Journal [afterw.] The Madras journal of literature and science, ed. by J.C. Morris

  • Author: Madras literary society
  • Publisher: N.A
  • ISBN: N.A
  • Category:
  • Page: N.A
  • View: 4096
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Becoming Modern

Becoming Modern

The Life of Mina Loy

  • Author: Carolyn Burke
  • Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux
  • ISBN: 0374709548
  • Category: Biography & Autobiography
  • Page: 250
  • View: 3116
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The poet and visual artist Mina Loy has long had an underground reputation as an exemplary avant-gardist. Born in London of mixed Jewish and English parentage, and a much photographed beauty, she moved in the pivotal circles of international modernism—in Florence as Gertrude Stein's friend and Marinetti's lover; in New York as Marcel Duchamp's co-conspirator and Djuna Barnes's confidante; in Mexico with the greatest love, the notorious boxer-poet Arthur Cravan; in Paris with the Surrealists and Man Ray. Carolyn Burke's riveting, authoritative biography, Becoming Modern, brings this highly original and representative figure wonderfully alive, in the process giving us a new picture of modernism—and one woman's important contribution to it.

Coup D'etat by the Gambia National Army

Coup D'etat by the Gambia National Army

July 22, 1994

  • Author: Lt. Col. Samsudeen Sarr
  • Publisher: Xlibris Corporation
  • ISBN: 1469100142
  • Category: Biography & Autobiography
  • Page: 292
  • View: 8820
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Coup de tat by the Gambia National Army, July 22nd 1994 is the authors autobiography chronicling the events of the title and its impact in his life. It is a story filled with lessons about Gambian history with a special focus on the genesis of the Gambian Military. For complexity, Lt. Col. Sarr alternated his story in the early chapters between scenes in the Gambia and his struggles to obtain political asylum in the United States of America. The book also revealed recollections from his childhood to educate his readers about certain social and spiritual beliefs and traditions in the Gambia. After the first few chapters, which set up the coup and established his thoughts about it, he further provided a detailed history of his personal life up to the time of his enlistment in the Gambia National Army. There he discussed his first days in the USA in the early 80s sequentially focusing on life in the Gambia before, during and after the coup. The book is intended to be instructive and educational to readers interested in, among other things, the background of the Gambia National Army and current APRC government headed by President Yaya A. J. J. Jammeh since July 22nd 1994.

Jungle Rescue

Jungle Rescue

  • Author: Robin Freeman
  • Publisher: Xlibris Corporation
  • ISBN: 1499005148
  • Category: Fiction
  • Page: 322
  • View: 2454
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WWII has broken out and the Japanese are sweeping down through the Pacific Islands towards Australia and are seemingly unstoppable. Utilising the specialised skills in tracking and bush survival Joe had learnt in his youth going walkabout with the aboriginals on his father’s 4 million acre cattle station in far north Western Australia, Joe is made an officer and put in command of a team of twelve highly trained men. These men are part of an elite force called the ‘Australian Jungle Survival and Rescue Detachment.’ Their missions are to rescue any Allied airmen shot down by the enemy over New Guinea and surrounding islands. They are flown to the crash sites in a C47 transport plane with an escort of fighter planes, and under cover of night parachute into enemy held territory to search for and rescue any survivors, who they then take to the coast for extraction by submarine. The night was so sultry and humid I could have cut it with a knife, and so dark it was impossible to see my hand in front of my face as I parachuted towards the invisible jungle somewhere two thousand feet below me. My chute was made from black silk and it was invisible against the night sky above me, and with no moon and stars to illuminate the night, I felt like I was falling down a bottomless, black well. The drone of the perfectly good aeroplane we had just jumped from was gradually diminishing into the distance, until the only sounds were the sigh and rush of wind passing through the many cords attached to the parachute. Somewhere above and behind me were twelve other men, my team of highly trained specialists in jungle warfare and survival, and in all likelihood experiencing the same emotions and trepidation as I was. Our mission was to locate and extract any survivors from a crashed American bomber that had been shot down by Japanese zeros yesterday. If any survivors were found, we would make our way to the coast for extraction by submarine that was hopefully heading towards the coordinates of the pickup point at this very moment. Since I had jumped from the C47 I had been mentally counting down the seconds, and with the jungle canopy now racing towards me at break neck speed, I braced myself as I stalled the parachute to lessen the impact of colliding with the trees and branches any second. As the sudden and violent impact drove the wind from my lungs I was unaware I had been holding my breath until I exhaled loudly. I tried to curl myself into a ball to avoid injuring myself as I fell through the tree canopy with a loud crash and crack of breaking branches and covered my face with one arm as I was whipped and slashed by the passing branches and leaves. The parachute finally became snagged in the high branches and I jerked to a sudden stop and hung suspended from my harness. I fumbled for the quick release catches on my pack strapped to my front and letting it fall listened intently for the sound of impact with the ground. Counting the seconds I was surprised to only count to five before I heard the dull thud. I was closer to the ground than I would have thought and thanked my lucky stars the chute got caught up just when it did. My next task was to release the chute harness and climb down the tree I was caught in without falling and injuring myself. I had a small torch in one of the pockets of my flak jacket and when I shone it around and below me, I saw what I was looking for. Just off to my right, and ten feet below, was a stout branch that I hoped would support my weight. I took a deep breath and then put the torch between my teeth before punching the quick release catch of my harness. As I fell the branch flashed past me and I grabbed at it with both hands and hung onto it tightly for dear life. My arms felt like they had been ripped from their sockets and I quickly swung a leg over the branch and hauled myself up onto it and sat astride it while I caught my breath and tried to calm my madly racing heart. I adjusted the straps securing the Sten gun to my chest then began to slide and pull myself along the branch to the trunk of the massive rainforest tree. Ten minutes later I was safely on the ground, none the worse for my descent except for some skin missing off my left knee, which must have happened when I first hit the branches plummeting through the canopy. I removed the gun from around my neck and cocking it held it at the ready as I shone the torch about in case I had fallen into the midst of a Japanese patrol, as had happened on one of my rescue missions several months ago. Luckily the six Japanese soldiers at the time were so startled and terrified by my sudden and noisy appearance from above, I had been able to quickly despatch them with my machine gun before they could even get a shot off. Luckily I was alone, and breathing a sigh of relief I then searched for my survival pack with my spare ammunition, medical kit, water and food rations. Quickly locating it near the trunk, I put it on my back then pulled my compass out from beneath my shirt. I always hung it from my neck on a strong piece of leather thonging so I didn’t lose it, as it would be easy to get hopelessly lost in the dense jungle, especially when it was overcast. From the coordinates sent out to base by the radio operator of the mortally hit bomber, I knew I had to maintain a course of 280 degrees from my location, and walk for at least a mile or so before hopefully finding the wrecked plane and any survivors. But first I had to find all of my team members before beginning the search. That was usually a difficult and time-consuming task, as we would be scattered across the jungle in a long line. We had a method of finding each other that had worked perfectly on the hundreds of missions we had so far accomplished. We each had a small, round, tin fox-whistle hanging from the dog tags around our necks, and when it was blown it made the sound of a rabbit in distress. To the enemy it would be just another of the hundreds of animal noises to be heard in the jungle at night, but to us it was like a beacon in the night as the shrill, distinctive sound carried a long way.