Search results for: adverse-childhood-experiences-aces

Adverse Childhood Experiences

Author : Roberta Waite
File Size : 83.43 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Download : 659
Read : 533
Download »
This guide provides healthcare students and professionals with a foundational background on adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) – traumatic early life experiences, which can have a profound impact on health in later life. ACEs can include being a victim of abuse, neglect or exposure to risk in the home or community. How healthcare students and professionals learn to recognize, react and respond to persons affected by trauma will lay the foundation for their relationships with patients. This book intentionally uses micro-to-macro lenses accompanied by a structural competency framework to elucidate health implications across the lifespan. It explores the nature of adversity and its effects on the physical, emotional, cognitive and social health of individuals, communities and society. The book, written by two experienced psychiatric nurses, will equip healthcare students and professionals with an understanding for critical change in practice and offer action steps designed to assist them with prevention and intervention approaches and steps to help build resilience. This book will be core reading for healthcare students within mental health, pediatric and primary care nursing courses. It will also be of interest to students and professionals in the social work, psychology and public health fields who are exploring resilience and trauma-informed practices

Adverse Childhood Experiences

Author : Roberta Waite
File Size : 22.97 MB
Format : PDF
Download : 791
Read : 1085
Download »
This guide provides healthcare students and professionals with a foundational background on adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) - traumatic early life experiences, which can have a profound impact on health in later life. ACEs can include being a victim of abuse, neglect or exposure to risk in the home or community. How healthcare students and professionals learn to recognize, react and respond to persons affected by trauma will lay the foundation for their relationships with patients. This book intentionally uses micro-to-macro lenses accompanied by a structural competency framework to elucidate health implications across the lifespan. It explores the nature of adversity and its effects on the physical, emotional, cognitive and social health of individuals, communities and society. The book, written by two experienced psychiatric nurses, will equip healthcare students and professionals with an understanding for critical change in practice and offer action steps designed to assist them with prevention and intervention approaches and steps to help build resilience. This book will be core reading for healthcare students within mental health, pediatric and primary care nursing courses. It will also be of interest to students and professionals in the social work, psychology and public health fields who are exploring resilience and trauma-informed practices

The Aces Revolution

Author : John Richard Trayser
File Size : 56.57 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Docs
Download : 684
Read : 816
Download »
John's book does a superb job of giving hope on how to prevent ACEs and has remarkable results for EVERY FAMILY THAT READS THE SECOND PART OF THE BOOK OUT LOUD TOGETHER! Conversations will begin that are essential to heartfelt communication. The ACE (Adverse Childhood Experiences) study details the significant impact of childhood trauma on the emotional and physical well being for the remainder of your life. John's book does a great job of showing the IMPACT of ACEs in all phases of our lives...and WE ARE ALL IMPACTED...even if you have zero ACEs yourself. This book gives hope to those who have lived in the shadows of pain and vulnerability from trauma in their childhood. His adopted grand daughter was a 7 ACE score...and after 9 years of love from the family...feels like a ZERO! You can change your stars with LOVE.

Adverse Childhood Experiences ACEs Why All the Fuss

Author : Ruth Whiteside
File Size : 87.42 MB
Format : PDF, Docs
Download : 816
Read : 811
Download »
This book presents a whole child, whole family, whole community overview of what ACEs means to families, children and young people in the North East of England and Cumbria. These regions of England have some of the highest levels of childhood adversity in England and this is reflected in the higher levels of risk taking behaviours young people take. It is clear that Adverse Childhood Experiences are a 'big deal' in the North for this generation and the next. Time for discussion is a luxury these families do not have. If not now- when? If not us- who? The book was written and developed in support of the Great North ACE conference 2019 at St James Park and provides the basis of understanding ACEs: why all the fuss and is applicable for any area anywhere in understanding why we need to see the whole child, the whole family and the whole community.

Adverse Childhood Experiences

Author : Nikki Klawiter
File Size : 90.85 MB
Format : PDF, Kindle
Download : 774
Read : 937
Download »
Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) have a tremendous impact on future violence victimization and perpetration, and lifelong health and opportunity. Working together, we can help create neighborhoods, communities, and a world in which every child can thrive. This book explores the 10 areas used to determine an individual ACEs score. The maximum score is a 10. The higher the ACEs score, the more likely the person is to experience a more difficult path in adulthood. This is the story of how I became a perfect 10.

Adverse Childhood Experiences and Couple Relationships

Author : Michael Redd
File Size : 83.18 MB
Format : PDF
Download : 458
Read : 268
Download »
The purpose of the present study was to replicate the Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) study framework, using relationship outcomes, and studied within the context of couple relationships. A thorough review of the literature on trauma, its prevalence, prior studies on ACEs, trauma and couples, and partner selection is presented. A secondary data analysis of 146 couples from a clinical source was used to test the present study's hypotheses. Actor-Partner Interdependence Model (APIM) was used to test the hypothesis that an individual's ACE exposure history would be negatively related to both their own and their partner's reported relationship quality. A cluster analysis was used to test the hypothesis that couples could be statistically grouped by ACE score combinations, and an ANOVA was used to test average group differences on relationship quality. Regression analyses were used to test hypotheses about partner selection. Results from the analysis include: (1) a small but significant negative impact of an individual's ACEs on their own reported relationship quality, but no finding of a significant impact on their partner's reported relationship quality; (2) a small but significant relationship between partner ACE scores; (3) a preliminary ability to group couples by ACE score combinations into three clusters (Low-Low, High-Moderate, Moderate-High) and a small but significant difference between two of the clusters; (4) an increased likelihood that couples will be partnered with those who have more similar than different ACE scores, and a significant trend that as ACEs increase, the likelihood of being partnered with someone who has similar ACEs will decrease; (5) a small but significant dose-response relationship between increasing ACEs and the likelihood of being partnered with someone who has more than minimal ACEs. Further discussion of the results, implications, limitations of the study, and future research directions are also included.

Adverse Childhood Experiences Effects

Author : Alvera Devillez
File Size : 69.21 MB
Format : PDF, Mobi
Download : 916
Read : 993
Download »
Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) have a tremendous impact on future violence victimization and perpetration, and lifelong health and opportunity. Working together, we can help create neighborhoods, communities, and a world in which every child can thrive. This book explores the 10 areas used to determine an individual ACEs score. The maximum score is a 10. The higher the ACEs score, the more likely the person is to experience a more difficult path in adulthood. This is the story of how I became a perfect 10.

Adverse Childhood Experiences

Author : Gordon J. G. Asmundson
File Size : 62.9 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Docs
Download : 156
Read : 584
Download »
Adverse Childhood Experiences: Using Evidence to Advance Research, Practice, Policy, and Prevention defines ACEs, provides a summary of the past 20 years of ACEs research, as well as provides guidance for the future directions for the field. It includes a review of the original ACEs Study, definitions of ACEs, and how ACEs are typically assessed. Other content includes a review of how ACEs are related to mental and physical health outcome, the neurodevelopmental mechanisms linking ACEs to psychopathology, sexual violence and sexual health outcomes, and violence across the lifespan. Important and contemporary issues in the field, like reconsidering how ACEs should be defined and assessed, the appropriateness of routine ACEs screening, thinking about ACEs from a public health and global perspective, strategies for preventing ACEs, understanding ACEs and trauma-informed care and resilience, and the importance of safe stable and nurturing environments for children are discussed. Adverse Childhood Experiences is a useful evidence-based resource for professionals working with children and families, including physicians, nurses, social workers, psychologists, lawyers, judges, as well as public health leaders, policy makers, and government delegates. Reviews the past 20 years of ACEs research Examines ACEs and mental and physical health Discusses the neurodevelopment mechanisms of ACEs and psychopathology Examines ACEs and violence across the lifespan Reconsiders the definition and assessment of ACEs Examines the issue of routine ACEs screening Discusses ACEs from a public health and global perspective Summarizes effective ACEs prevention, trauma-informed care, and resilience Provides recommendations for the future directions of the ACEs field

Building Resilience in Students Impacted by Adverse Childhood Experiences

Author : Victoria E. Romero
File Size : 52.66 MB
Format : PDF
Download : 234
Read : 573
Download »
Use trauma-informed strategies to give students the skills and support they need to succeed in school and life Nearly half of all children have been exposed to at least one adverse childhood experience (ACE), such as poverty, divorce, neglect, substance abuse, or parent incarceration. This workbook-style resource shows K-12 educators how to integrate trauma-informed strategies into daily instructional practice through expanded focus on: The experiences and challenges of students impacted by ACEs, including suicidal tendencies, cyberbullying, and drugs Behavior as a form of communication and how to explicitly teach new behaviors How to mitigate trauma and build innate resiliency

Effects of Adverse Childhood Experiences ACEs on Control of Diabetes

Author : Tammy K. Mentzel
File Size : 20.45 MB
Format : PDF
Download : 324
Read : 452
Download »
Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) are defined as abuse, neglect and other traumatic events that are experienced by individuals under the age of 18. The historic landmark ACE study showed as the number of ACEs increase, the risk for health problems also increases in a strong and graded fashion. The ACE study also found a relationship between the number of traumatic childhood experiences and the health and well-being of the individual as an adult. The present study examined the prevalence of ACEs in an adult cohort from an urban community health center and the association between the number of ACEs and poor diabetic control as well as social demographic characteristics of the cohort. The study involved administering the validated ACE questionnaire to 112 subjects and recording the latest A1C test result. The cohort ranged in age from 25 to 78 years, 65% were black and 29% were white, 45% had more than a high school education. ACE score ranged from 0 to 9 with a mean score of 2.8 (SD, 2.3) with 14% having a score of 0; 21% with a score of 1; 16% with a score of 2; 17% with a score of 3; and 32% with a score of = 4. A1C ranged from 5.0 to 13.4 with a mean of 7.9 (SD, 1.8). Comparing A1C and ACE to social demographics showed gender to be significant with a mean A1C for females of 7.7 (SD, 1.5) compared to males 8.2 (SD, 2.2) with a p-value of 0.021. ACE mean for females was 3.3 (SD, 2.4) compared to males 2.2 (SD, 2.0) with a p-value of .011. Incidences of ACEs by gender were also found to be significant with women recalling more incidences of sexual abuse (p=0.001) and emotional neglect (p=0.020). Incidences of ACEs by race/ethnicity was significant for physiological abuse (p=0.049), parental divorce (p=0.006), witnessing maternal violence (p=0.025) and household criminal activity (p=0.052) between whites and blacks and significant for physical abuse between blacks and others (p=0.035). Incidences of ACEs by educational level was significant for recalling household criminal activity between those who had less than a high school degree compared to those with more than a high school degree (p=0.006). Total A1C was significantly influenced by the ACE category of psychological abuse (p=0.053). The present study found a significantly higher prevalence of ACEs compared to the original landmark ACE study. It was also found that A1C and ACE items were related to social demographics. These findings support the need for further research to determine if social demographic related interventions could reduce the health effects of ACEs.

Alleviating the Educational Impact of Adverse Childhood Experiences

Author : R. Martin Reardon
File Size : 82.7 MB
Format : PDF, Kindle
Download : 281
Read : 458
Download »
Recent crises—whether policy-induced (e.g., family separation at the Mexico/U.S. border) or natural disaster-related (e.g., hurricanes in Florida and North Carolina and wildfires in California)—have galvanized the attention of the U.S. and international public on the plight of children who endure these traumatic events. The sheer enormity of such wrenching events tend to overshadow the trauma endured by many children whose everyday life circumstances fall short of affording them a safe, stable, and nurturing environment. At the national level, three rounds of data collection spanning January 2008 through April 2014 constituted the National Survey of Children’s Exposure to Violence (NatSCEV) that—according to Finkelhor, Turner, Shattuck, and Hambly (2013) in reporting on the 2011 round—assessed “a wide range of childhood victimizations” (pp. 614-615). Among many other findings, Finkelor et al. concluded that “overall, 57.7% of the children and youth had experienced or witnessed at least 1 to 5 aggregate exposures (assaults and bullying, sexual victimization, maltreatment by a caregiver, property victimization, or witnessing victimization) in the year before this survey” (p. 619). According to the recent re-visiting of NatSCEV II by Turner et al. (2017), “almost 1 in 4 children and adolescents ages 5-15 in the United States lived in family environments with only modest levels of safety, stability, and nurturance, while about 1 in 15 had consistently low levels across multiple domains” (p. 8). Adverse childhood events (ACEs) have both immediate and long-term impacts on children’s health and well-being (Banyard, Hambly, & Grych, 2017; Bowen, Jarrett, Stahl, Forrester, & Valmaggia, 2018; Walker & Walsh, 2015). Children do not shed their entanglement with ACEs at the schoolroom door. To highlight just one study, Jimenez, Wade, Lin, Morrow, & Reichman (2016) conducted a secondary analysis of a national urban birth cohort and found that experiencing ACEs in early childhood was “associated with below-average, teacher-reported academic and literacy skills and [more] behavior problems in kindergarten” (p. 1). Chapter Proposals For this fifth volume in the Current Perspectives on School/University/Community Research series, we invite chapter proposals from authors who are engaged in school-university-community collaborative educational research focused on the alleviation of the educational impact of adverse childhood experiences. Authors may submit proposals to discuss research projects that have been completed or that are still in progress, but all proposals should clearly indicate the engagement of stakeholders from each of the three categories (school, university, and community). Chapter proposals of no more than 500 words are welcome. Please cite at least 10 sources and include a reference page. The proposal cover page must contain the author’s full contact information. For multiple authored proposals, please list all authors’ contact information and indicate the corresponding author. Decisions will be made and communicated by March 25, 2019, and a Manual for Authors will be provided to accepted corresponding authors. At all stages, manuscripts must conform to 6th edition APA conventions. Following the submission of full chapter drafts on June 3, 2019, a blind review process among the corresponding authors will be conducted and feedback communicated by June 24, 2019. (See Projected 2019 Deadlines.) Full chapters will range from 7,000 to 8,000 words in Times New Roman 12, double spaced text, inclusive of title, abstract, manuscript, and references and are to be submitted to the volume editors as a Microsoft Word email attachment by August 26, 2019. Graphics and images may be included. See Author Guidelines. Projected 2019 Deadlines Chapter Proposals: February 28, 2019 Notification of Invitation to Contribute Chapter: March 25, 2019 Submission of Draft Chapters for Blind Peer Review: June 3, 2019 Return of Blind Peer Reviewed Chapters to Authors: June 24, 2019 Submission of Revised Chapters: August 26, 2019 Submission of Final Chapters to IAP: October 21, 2019 Anticipated Publication in Spring 2020

Adverse Childhood Experiences ACEs and Housing Vulnerability

Author : Charlotte Grey (Researcher)
File Size : 21.84 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Download : 829
Read : 530
Download »

Adverse Childhood Experiences ACEs and Toxic Stress Among College Students

Author : Cynthia Lee Mackay-Neorr
File Size : 70.82 MB
Format : PDF, Kindle
Download : 439
Read : 642
Download »
Mental health has become a national health crisis, with suicide as the second leading cause of death for 10 to 34-year-olds. One in five college students experiences anxiety or depression, to the extent that it is hard for them to function. Compounding the effects of college-related stress, student exposure to childhood adversity has been associated with anxiety, depression, and PTSD. ACEs refer to childhood abuse, neglect, and household dysfunction. The landmark ACEs study found significant links between childhood trauma and risk for chronic disease, social, and emotional problems in adulthood. Individuals with three or more ACEs have an increased risk of negative health outcomes. ACEs are also a global public health issue, with over 275 million children worldwide experiencing some form of violence in the home. Nationally, over half of the population has experienced at least one ACE, and 25% report two or more.ACEs, toxic stress, and poor health outcomes are particularly problematic for college students, considering stress-related (mal)adaptive coping strategies that negatively impact students before and during college. The purpose of this study was to understand and describe the characteristics and prevalence of college students most at risk for high ACEs and determine the association between college student ACEs and academic success. A quantitative correlational survey design was used to determine the relationship between ACEs scores and first-generation status among college students. ACEs scores and demographic data were used to determine prediction values for GPA. Archival data consisted of online student survey responses (N = 1,197) collected from an exploratory study investigating the relationship between ACEs and methods for which college students navigate stress. The instrument included four separate adapted surveys, including participant demographics, and was administered over three terms.Findings demonstrated 59% of students reported at least one ACE, 38% experienced two or more ACEs, and high ACEs totaled 22%. Mann-Whitney U results indicated higher ACEs among first-generation students as compared to multigenerational students. Multiple regression significantly predicted lower GPA for students identifying as first-generation, male, African American/Black, or multiple race/ethnicity, and students with high ACEs. Evidence-based practice implications and recommendations for future research are discussed.

The Roots of Resilience

Author : Jessie Mee
File Size : 38.84 MB
Format : PDF
Download : 713
Read : 371
Download »
Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) are associated with multiple negative outcomes in young adulthood, including psychological distress, impediment of attaining normative developmental roles, and the presence of physical health risk factors. What is less understood is the relationship between ACEs and positive outcomes, such as wellbeing, and the processes by which it may be achieved following childhood maltreatment. Resilience has also been identified as an important and dynamic process, by which people can overcome early adversity. Accordingly, this research sought to explore the relationships between ACEs, resilience and wellbeing. The first study investigated the pervasiveness of ACEs and gender differences, using a newly revised measure of childhood adversity. The second study explored the effects of ACEs on five domains of wellbeing, and the possible mediation of this relationship by resilience resources. A self-selected sample (N = 1,266) aged between 18 and 35, who had grown up in New Zealand, completed an anonymous online survey consisting of the revised Adverse Childhood Experiences scale, which measured abuse and household dysfunction, along with newly added community level adversities. They also completed the Resilience Scale for Adults - a measure of six dynamic resilience resources; and the PERMA-Profiler - a new measure of Seligman's (2011) five domains of wellbeing, which had not been used before to measures associations between wellbeing and early adversity. ACEs were prevalent, and the most common ACEs were peer isolation and rejection, a family member with a mental illness or who had attempted suicide, and peer victimisation, respectively. Support was found for the use of the expanded ACEs measure, with peer isolation and rejection, and peer victimisation both new additions to the ACE scale. Findings highlighted differences between the genders, with gender diverse people experiencing significantly higher rates of cumulative childhood trauma than females and males. ACEs were also associated with decreased wellbeing across all domains; and this relationship was mediated by resilience and its constituent elements. The resilience resources perception of self, perception of future, and social resources were shown as being particularly important to wellbeing, in those who had experienced childhood maltreatment. The findings implicated resilience as being an important part of the realisation of wellbeing following traumatic childhoods, and emphasised the importance of considering resilience as a multi-dimensional process. The benefits of early intervention from a social ecological approach to resilience are discussed.

The Role of Adverse Childhood Experiences ACEs in Clinical Disorders

Author : Dorothea Regina Isele
File Size : 22.81 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Download : 427
Read : 1302
Download »

Adverse Childhood Experiences ACEs and Their Impact on Substance Misuse Overall Health

Author : Casey Balio
File Size : 83.66 MB
Format : PDF, ePub
Download : 109
Read : 703
Download »

P023 The Prevalence of Adverse Childhood Experiences ACEs in Live Kidney Donors

Author :
File Size : 63.48 MB
Format : PDF
Download : 983
Read : 1304
Download »
IntroductionThe relationship between ACEs (including physical and sexual abuse, witnessing domestic violence or growing up with household substance abuse) and poorer health outcomes is well established. A history of ACEs increases risks of health-harming behaviours and affects neurological, immunological and hormonal development but is not routinely considered in a live donor population. We have begun to measure ACEs as part of the psychological assessment of people offering a directed and non-directed kidney donation. MethodsAll potential live kidney donors attending the Renal Psychology Service for a pre-donation assessment completed the GP ACE questionnaire (adapted by Public Health Wales, 2015), alongside measures of psychological well-being and a semi-structured interview.ResultsTo date 11 donors (6 Male/5 female; mean age 49) have completed the ACE questionnaire. Scores ranged from 0 to 8 (median 1). Of these, 8 people had experienced at least 1 ACE and 5 had scores u2265 4.Table 1. Prevalence of Individual ACEs ACEtttttPrevalence (%)Child Maltreatment:tttVerbal abusetttt27Physical abusett 18Sexual abusett 18Neglectt 18Childhood Household Included:tParental sep/divorce t 36Domestic Violence t 18Mental Illnesst 36Alcohol abuset 36Drug uset 9Incarceration t 9DiscussionACEs were prevalent and higher than those previously found in the general population in Wales (Public Health Wales, 2015); 45% scored u2265 4 compared with 13.6% in the general population. Currently there is no evidence to exclude donors on the basis of a high ACE score but renal psychologists are well placed to counsel donors with a history of trauma and offer appropriate psycho-education. Further research into the long term health outcomes of donors with high ACE scores may contribute to an understanding of a potential link between childhood trauma and subsequent risk in live kidney donors.

The Impact of Raising Educators Awareness about Adverse Childhood Experiences on Their Attitudes Towards Trauma Informed Care

Author : Kristina L. Szobocsan
File Size : 38.84 MB
Format : PDF, Docs
Download : 116
Read : 602
Download »
According to Magruder, McLaughlin and Borbon (2017) trauma is pervasive worldwide and common in children. Felitti et al. (1998) published their adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) study highlighting what appeared to be a strong relationship between traumatic childhood experiences and risk factors for disease and death in adulthood. Harris (2015) indicated that long-term traumatic experiences are maladaptive, physically changing a person's DNA. Research on the lifetime impacts of ACEs is lacking in the educational field. This study evaluated the impact of raising educators' awareness about adverse childhood experiences on changing their attitudes towards trauma informed care. An embedded mixed methods design was utilized to gather both quantitative and qualitative data. The utilization of a pragmatic worldview provided the researcher with an understanding of how the exploration of ACEs by educators' impacts their attitudes towards trauma informed care. With such knowledge schools may be able to identify educators' readiness for trauma informed care and gain insight into future professional development focused on childhood trauma. The results suggested a positive growth in raising educators' awareness about adverse childhood experiences on their attitudes towards trauma informed care.

Relationship Between Adverse Childhood Experiences and Arterial Stiffness Over Time from Childhood Into Early Adulthood

Author : Talha Rafiq
File Size : 83.91 MB
Format : PDF
Download : 117
Read : 179
Download »
It is well established in the literature that there is an association among adults between adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and arterial stiffness, and between arterial stiffness and cardiovascular disease. However, recent cross-sectional evidence suggests that ACEs may play an important role in the development and progression of arterial stiffness, but it remains unclear when these changes begin to manifest. Therefore, the purpose of this research was to examine the relationship between ACEs and arterial stiffness from childhood into adulthood using population-based longitudinal data. A total of 76 young adults (females = 44), with an average age of 21 years (SD = 1) were included in this study. Overall, a total of 71 respondents reported to have experienced at least one ACE. The findings of this study showed ACEs-exposed individuals have a greater increase in arterial stiffness over time from childhood into young adulthood. This increase was similar for both males and females. Also, differences in heart rate, systolic blood pressure, body mass index, and physical activity did not mediate the relationship between ACEs and arterial stiffness over time. It is therefore important to recognize individuals with exposure to ACEs early on in life in an effort to lower the risk of arterial stiffness and in turn the cascade of events leading to cardiovascular disease.

We Have All Got Hurt

Author : Angele Boule
File Size : 28.19 MB
Format : PDF, ePub
Download : 802
Read : 150
Download »
Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) have a tremendous impact on future violence victimization and perpetration, and lifelong health and opportunity. Working together, we can help create neighborhoods, communities, and a world in which every child can thrive. This book explores the 10 areas used to determine an individual ACEs score. The maximum score is a 10. The higher the ACEs score, the more likely the person is to experience a more difficult path in adulthood. This is the story of how I became a perfect 10.