Search Results for "america-s-education-press"

America's Education Press

America's Education Press

Yearbook

  • Author: N.A
  • Publisher: N.A
  • ISBN: N.A
  • Category: Education
  • Page: N.A
  • View: 9186
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The Dissenting Tradition in American Education

The Dissenting Tradition in American Education

  • Author: James C. Carper,Thomas C. Hunt
  • Publisher: Peter Lang
  • ISBN: 9780820479200
  • Category: Education
  • Page: 286
  • View: 2237
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During the mid-nineteenth century, Americans created the functional equivalent of earlier state religious establishments. Supported by mandatory taxation, purportedly inclusive, and vested with messianic promise, public schooling, like the earlier established churches, was touted as a bulwark of the Republic and as an essential agent of moral and civic virtue. As was the case with dissenters from early American established churches, some citizens and religious minorities have dissented from the public school system, what historian Sidney Mead calls the country's «established church.» They have objected to the «orthodoxy» of the public school, compulsory taxation, and attempts to abolish their schools or bring them into conformity with the state school paradigm. The Dissenting Tradition in American Education recounts episodes of Catholic and Protestant nonconformity since the inception of public education, including the creation of Catholic and Protestant schools, homeschooling, conflicts regarding regulation of nonconforming schools, and controversy about the propositions of knowledge and dispositions of belief and value sanctioned by the state school. Such dissent suggests that Americans consider disestablishing the public school and ponder means of education more suited to their confessional pluralism and commitments to freedom of conscience, parental liberty, and educational justice.

Education Directory

Education Directory

  • Author: United States. Office of Education
  • Publisher: N.A
  • ISBN: N.A
  • Category: Education
  • Page: N.A
  • View: 5402
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Democracy's Schools

Democracy's Schools

The Rise of Public Education in America

  • Author: Johann N. Neem
  • Publisher: JHU Press
  • ISBN: 1421423219
  • Category: Education
  • Page: 240
  • View: 5577
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At a time when Americans are debating the future of public education, Johann N. Neem tells the inspiring story of how and why Americans built a robust public school system in the decades between the Revolution and the Civil War. It’s a story in which ordinary people in towns across the country worked together to form districts and build schoolhouses and reformers sought to expand tax support and give every child a liberal education. By the time of the Civil War, most northern states had made common schools free, and many southern states were heading in the same direction. Americans made schooling a public good. Yet back then, like today, Americans disagreed over the kind of education needed, who should pay for it, and how schools should be governed. Neem explores the history and meaning of these disagreements. As Americans debated, teachers and students went about the daily work of teaching and learning. Neem takes us into the classrooms of yore so that we may experience public schools from the perspective of the people whose daily lives were most affected by them. Ultimately, Neem concludes, public schools encouraged a diverse people to see themselves as one nation. By studying the origins of America’s public schools, Neem urges us to focus on the defining features of democratic education: promoting equality, nurturing human beings, preparing citizens, and fostering civic solidarity.

The Flat World and Education

The Flat World and Education

How America's Commitment to Equity Will Determine Our Future

  • Author: Linda Darling-Hammond
  • Publisher: Teachers College Press
  • ISBN: 9780807770627
  • Category: Education
  • Page: 394
  • View: 2970
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Argues that the education system in America needs to make drastic changes in order to build a system of high-achieving and equitable schools that protects every child's right to learn.

Teaching in America

Teaching in America

The Slow Revolution

  • Author: Gerald GRANT,Christine E. Murray,Gerald Grant
  • Publisher: Harvard University Press
  • ISBN: 0674037898
  • Category: Education
  • Page: 288
  • View: 537
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If the essential acts of teaching are the same for schoolteachers and professors, why are they seen as members of quite separate professions? Would the nation's schools be better served if teachers shared more of the authority that professors have long enjoyed? Will a slow revolution be completed that enables schoolteachers to take charge of their practice--to shoulder more responsibility for hiring, mentoring, promoting, and, if necessary, firing their peers? This book explores these questions by analyzing the essential acts of teaching in a way that will help all teachers become more thoughtful practitioners. It presents portraits of teachers (most of them women) struggling to take control of their practice in a system dominated by an administrative elite (mostly male). The educational system, Gerald Grant and Christine Murray argue, will be saved not by better managers but by better teachers. And the only way to secure them is by attracting talented recruits, developing their skills, and instituting better means of assessing teachers' performance. Grant and Murray describe the evolution of the teaching profession over the last hundred years, and then focus in depth on recent experiments that gave teachers the power to shape their schools and mentor young educators. The authors conclude by analyzing three equally possible scenarios depicting the role of teachers in 2020.

What are Schools For?

What are Schools For?

Holistic Education in American Culture

  • Author: Ron Miller
  • Publisher: Alternative Education Resource Organization
  • ISBN: N.A
  • Category: Education
  • Page: 175
  • View: 478
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This book is a powerful exposition and critique of the historical context and cultural/philosophical foundations of contemporary mainstream American education.

City Schools and the American Dream

City Schools and the American Dream

Reclaiming the Promise of Public Education

  • Author: Pedro Noguera
  • Publisher: Teachers College Press
  • ISBN: 9780807743812
  • Category: Education
  • Page: 189
  • View: 5380
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Pedro Noguera argues that higher standards and more tests, by themselves, will not make low-income urban students any smarter and the schools they attend more successful without substantial investment in the communities in which they live. Drawing on extensive research performed in San Francisco, Oakland, Berkeley, and Richmond, Noguera demonstrates how school and student achievement is influenced by social forces such as demographic change, poverty, drug trafficking, violence, and social inequity. Readers get a detailed glimpse into the lives of teachers and students working "against the odds" to succeed. Noguera sends a strong message to those who would have urban schools "shape up or shut down": invest in the future of these students and schools, and we can reach the kind of achievement and success that typify only more privileged communities. Public schools are the last best hope for many poor families living in cities across the nation. Noguera gives politicians, policymakers, and the public its own standard to achieve, provide the basic economic and social support so that teachers and students can get the job done!

Schooling America

Schooling America

How the Public Schools Meet the Nation's Changing Needs

  • Author: Patricia Albjerg Graham
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press
  • ISBN: 9780198038443
  • Category: Education
  • Page: 288
  • View: 2386
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Patricia Graham is one of America's most esteemed historians of education, formerly Dean of Harvard's Graduate School of Education and Director of the National Institute of Education. In this informative volume, Graham offers a vibrant history of American education in the last century. Drawing on a wide array of sources, from government reports to colorful anecdotes, Graham skillfully illustrates Americans' changing demands for our schools, and how schools have responded by providing what critics want, though never as completely or as quickly as they would like. In 1900, as waves of immigrants swept the nation, the American public wanted schools to assimilate students into American life, combining the basics of English and arithmetic with emphasis on patriotism, hard work, fair play and honesty. In the 1920s, the focus shifted from schools serving a national need to serving individual needs; education was to help children adjust to life. By 1954 the emphasis moved to access, particularly for African-American children to desegregated classrooms, but also access to special programs for the gifted, the poor, the disabled, and non-English speakers. Now Americans want achievement for all, defined as higher test scores. The public largely ignored colleges until after World War II when research received international recognition and enrollments grew. Throughout the narrative, we meet the passionate educators, scholars and journalists who drove particular agendas, and we also meet Graham's own family, starting with her immigrant father's first day of school and moving through her experiences as a teacher. Invaluable background in the ongoing debate on education in the United States, this book offers an insightful look at what the public has sought from its educational institutions, what educators have delivered, and what remains to be done.

Learning to Improve

Learning to Improve

How America’s Schools Can Get Better at Getting Better

  • Author: Anthony S. Bryk,Louis M. Gomez,Alicia Grunow,Paul G. LeMahieu
  • Publisher: Harvard Education Press
  • ISBN: 161250793X
  • Category: Education
  • Page: 280
  • View: 3270
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As a field, education has largely failed to learn from experience. Time after time, promising education reforms fall short of their goals and are abandoned as other promising ideas take their place. In Learning to Improve, the authors argue for a new approach. Rather than “implementing fast and learning slow,” they believe educators should adopt a more rigorous approach to improvement that allows the field to “learn fast to implement well.” Using ideas borrowed from improvement science, the authors show how a process of disciplined inquiry can be combined with the use of networks to identify, adapt, and successfully scale up promising interventions in education. Organized around six core principles, the book shows how “networked improvement communities” can bring together researchers and practitioners to accelerate learning in key areas of education. Examples include efforts to address the high rates of failure among students in community college remedial math courses and strategies for improving feedback to novice teachers. Learning to Improve offers a new paradigm for research and development in education that promises to be a powerful driver of improvement for the nation’s schools and colleges.