Search Results for "an-intimate-history-of-killing"

An Intimate History of Killing

An Intimate History of Killing

Face-to-face Killing in Twentieth-century Warfare

  • Author: Joanna Bourke
  • Publisher: Granta Books (UK)
  • ISBN: 9781862073210
  • Category: Combat
  • Page: 564
  • View: 7812
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Bourke uses the letters, diaries, memoirs and reports of veterans from three conflicts - World War I, World War II and the Vietnam War - to establish a picture of the man-at-arms. What she suggests is that the structure of war encourages pleasure in killing, and that perfectly ordinary, gentle human beings can become enthusiastic killes without becoming brutalized.

The Great Mortality

The Great Mortality

An Intimate History of the Black Death

  • Author: John Kelly
  • Publisher: HarperCollins UK
  • ISBN: 0007150709
  • Category: Black Death
  • Page: 364
  • View: 905
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A compelling history of the Black Death that scoured Europe in the mid-14th century killing 25 million people. It was one of the worst human disasters in history.

Deep Violence

Deep Violence

Military Violence, War Play and the Social Life of Weapons

  • Author: Joanna Bourke
  • Publisher: Counterpoint LLC
  • ISBN: 9781619024632
  • Category: Political Science
  • Page: 312
  • View: 9476
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Discusses how violence and war have permeated every facet of contemporary human life, including the way people speak and the way children play, and calls for a radical change in attitude towards militarism.

The Story of Pain

The Story of Pain

From Prayer to Painkillers

  • Author: Joanna Bourke
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
  • ISBN: 0199689423
  • Category: Philosophy
  • Page: 396
  • View: 4551
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Everyone knows what it feels like to be in pain. Scraped knees, toothaches, migraines, giving birth, cancer, heart attacks, and heartaches: pain permeates our entire lives. We also witness other people - loved ones - suffering, and we 'feel with' them. It is easy to assume this is the end of the story: 'pain-is-pain-is-pain', and that is all there is to say. But it is not. In fact, the way in which people respond to what they describe as 'painful' has changed considerably over time. In the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, for example, people believed that pain served a specific (and positive) function - it was a message from God or Nature; it would perfect the spirit. 'Suffer in this life and you wouldn't suffer in the next one'. Submission to pain was required. Nothing could be more removed from twentieth and twenty-first century understandings, where pain is regarded as an unremitting evil to be 'fought'. Focusing on the English-speaking world, this book tells the story of pain since the eighteenth century, addressing fundamental questions about the experience and nature of suffering over the last three centuries. How have those in pain interpreted their suffering - and how have these interpretations changed over time? How have people learnt to conduct themselves when suffering? How do friends and family react? And what about medical professionals: should they immerse themselves in the suffering person or is the best response a kind of professional detachment? As Joanna Bourke shows in this fascinating investigation, people have come up with many different answers to these questions over time. And a history of pain can tell us a great deal about how we might respond to our own suffering in the present - and, just as importantly, to the suffering of those around us.

The Black Death

The Black Death

An Intimate History

  • Author: John Hatcher
  • Publisher: Hachette UK
  • ISBN: 0297856030
  • Category: History
  • Page: 384
  • View: 9493
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How the people of a typical English village lived and died in the worst epidemic in history. The Black Death remains the greatest disaster to befall humanity, killing about half the population of the planet in the 14th century. John Hatcher recreates everyday medieval life in a parish in Suffolk, from which an exceptional number of documents survive. This enables us to view events through the eyes of its residents, revealing in unique detail what it was like to live and die in these terrifying times. With scrupulous attention to historical accuracy, John Hatcher describes what the parishioners experienced, what they knew and what they believed. His narrative is peopled with characters developed from the villagers named in the actual town records and a series of dramatic scenes portray how contemporaries must have experienced the momentous events.

Warrior's Dishonour

Warrior's Dishonour

Barbarity, Morality and Torture in Modern Warfare

  • Author: Dr George Kassimeris
  • Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.
  • ISBN: 1409495604
  • Category: Technology & Engineering
  • Page: 254
  • View: 3226
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The characteristic act of men at war is not killing. It is killing by committing shocking and unspeakable atrocities, when circumstances permit. What drives ordinary people into hatred, genocide, inhumanity and evil? What turns friends and neighbours against each other with such savagery? Where does such barbarity come from? This collection examines the anarchy, cruelty and overwhelming confusion of modern warfare. In particular it analyzes: • what happens when morality vanishes from the battlefield and why torture is endemic in modern warfare; • how human rights, in times of war, lose meaning as a set of principles; • whether official propaganda and enemy demonization make barbaric behaviour easier; • how we can develop cultures opposed to torture that damage the legitimacy of our societies. Through a wealth of case studies that have been carefully selected in terms of their themes, approaches and methodologies, this comprehensive volume provokes discussion and enhances understanding from a variety of disciplinary perspectives.

Kill Anything That Moves

Kill Anything That Moves

The Real American War in Vietnam

  • Author: Nick Turse
  • Publisher: Metropolitan Books
  • ISBN: 0805095470
  • Category: History
  • Page: 384
  • View: 3944
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Based on classified documents and first-person interviews, a startling history of the American war on Vietnamese civilians Americans have long been taught that events such as the notorious My Lai massacre were isolated incidents in the Vietnam War, carried out by "a few bad apples." But as award-winning journalist and historian Nick Turse demonstrates in this groundbreaking investigation, violence against Vietnamese noncombatants was not at all exceptional during the conflict. Rather, it was pervasive and systematic, the predictable consequence of orders to "kill anything that moves." Drawing on more than a decade of research in secret Pentagon files and extensive interviews with American veterans and Vietnamese survivors, Turse reveals for the first time how official policies resulted in millions of innocent civilians killed and wounded. In shocking detail, he lays out the workings of a military machine that made crimes in almost every major American combat unit all but inevitable. Kill Anything That Moves takes us from archives filled with Washington's long-suppressed war crime investigations to the rural Vietnamese hamlets that bore the brunt of the war; from boot camps where young American soldiers learned to hate all Vietnamese to bloodthirsty campaigns like Operation Speedy Express, in which a general obsessed with body counts led soldiers to commit what one participant called "a My Lai a month." Thousands of Vietnam books later, Kill Anything That Moves, devastating and definitive, finally brings us face-to-face with the truth of a war that haunts Americans to this day.

Imagining Soldiers and Fathers in the Mid-Victorian Era

Imagining Soldiers and Fathers in the Mid-Victorian Era

Charlotte Yonge's Models of Manliness

  • Author: Dr Susan Walton
  • Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.
  • ISBN: 1409475840
  • Category: Literary Criticism
  • Page: 254
  • View: 487
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Beginning with the premise that women's perceptions of manliness are crucial to its construction, Susan Walton focuses on the life and writings of Charlotte Yonge as a prism for understanding the formulation of masculinities in the Victorian period. Yonge was a prolific writer whose bestselling fiction and extensive journalism enjoyed a wide readership. Walton situates Yonge's work in the context of her family connections with the army, showing that an interlocking of worldly and spiritual warfare was fundamental to Yonge's outlook. For Yonge, all good Christians are soldiers, and Walton argues persuasively that the medievalised discourse of sanctified violence executed by upright moral men that is often connected with late nineteenth-century Imperialism began earlier in the century, and that Yonge's work was one major strand that gave it substance. Of significance, Yonge also endorsed missionary work, which she viewed as an extension of a father's duties in the neighborhood and which was closely allied to a vigorous promotion of refashioned Tory paternalism. Walton's study is rich in historical context, including Yonge's connections with the Tractarians, the effects of industrialization, and Britain's Imperial enterprises. Informed by extensive archival scholarship, Walton offers important insights into the contradictory messages about manhood current in the mid-nineteenth century through the works of a major but undervalued Victorian author.

The German-Jewish Soldiers of the First World War in History and Memory

The German-Jewish Soldiers of the First World War in History and Memory

  • Author: Tim Grady
  • Publisher: Liverpool University Press
  • ISBN: 1781388830
  • Category: History
  • Page: 260
  • View: 7648
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The First World War saw almost 100,000 German Jews wear the uniform of the Imperial army; some 12,000 of these soldiers lost their lives in battle. Over the last century, public memory of their sacrifice has been very gradually subsumed into the much greater catastrophe of the Holocaust. This book focuses on the multifaceted ways in which these Jewish soldiers have variously been remembered and forgotten from 1914 through until the late 1970s. During and immediately after the conflict, Germany's Jewish population were active participants in a memory culture that honoured the war dead as national heroes. With the decline of the Weimar Republic and the National Socialists' rise to power, however, the public commemoration of the Jewish soldiers gradually faded, as Germany's Jewish communities were systematically destroyed by the Nazi regime. It was only in the late 1950s that both Jews and other Germans began to rediscover and to re-remember this largely neglected group. By examining Germany's complex and continually evolving memory culture, this book opens up a new approach to the study of both German and German-Jewish history. In doing so, it draws out a narrative of entangled and overlapping relations between Jews and non-Jews during the short twentieth century. The Jewish / non-Jewish relationship, the book argues, did not end on the battlefields of the First World War, but ran much deeper to extend through into the era of the Cold War.

Fear

Fear

A Cultural History

  • Author: Joanna Bourke
  • Publisher: Hachette UK
  • ISBN: 034900692X
  • Category: History
  • Page: 512
  • View: 6535
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Fear is one of the most basic and most powerful of all the human emotions. Sometimes it is hauntingly specific: flames searing patterns on the ceiling, a hydrogen bomb, a terrorist. More often, anxiety overwhelms us from some source within: there is an irrational panic about venturing outside, a dread of failure, a premonition of doom. In this astonishing book we encounter the fears and anxieties of hundreds of British and American men, women and children. From fear of the crowd to agoraphobia, from battle experiences to fear of nuclear attack, from cancer to AIDS, this is an utterly original insight into the mindset of the twentieth century from one of most brilliant historians and thinkers of our time.