Search Results for "art-in-chicago-1945-1995"

Art in Chicago, 1945-1995

Art in Chicago, 1945-1995

  • Author: Lynne Warren
  • Publisher: N.A
  • ISBN: N.A
  • Category: Art
  • Page: 312
  • View: 2567
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Art in Chicago, 1945-1995 examines the unique development of artistic traditions within the cultural, social, and political life of this quintessential American city during the second half of the twentieth century. Capturing the verve and innovation that characterized each decade, the book considers painting, sculpture, photography, drawing, and media arts (film, video, performance) by 150 artists who have either always lived and worked in Chicago or have created significant bodies of work in residence there. Among the artists profiled are Roger Brown, Harry Callahan, Ruth Duckworth, Jeanne Dunning, Leon Golub, Robert Heinecken, Richard Hunt, June Leaf, Kerry James Marshall, Laszlo Moholy-Nagy, Archibald J. Motley, Jr., Jim Nutt, Ed Paschke, Hirsch Perlman, Martin Puryear, Arnaldo Roche Rabell, Miroslaw Rogala, Alejandro Romero, Kay Rosen, Hollis Sigler, Aaron Siskind, Nancy Spero, Tony Tasset, H. C. Westermann, Claire Zeisler, and the Zhou Brothers. More than 170 color reproductions are set amidst a running timeline of historical events in both Chicago and beyond, and over 140 black-and-white photographs complement the text.

Art in Chicago

Art in Chicago

A History from the Fire to Now

  • Author: Maggie Taft,Robert Cozzolino
  • Publisher: N.A
  • ISBN: 022616831X
  • Category: Art
  • Page: 448
  • View: 4946
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For decades now, the story of art in America has been dominated by New York. It gets the majority of attention, the stories of its schools and movements and masterpieces the stuff of pop culture legend. Chicago, on the other hand . . . well, people here just get on with the work of making art. Now that art is getting its due. Art in Chicago is a magisterial account of the long history of Chicago art, from the rupture of the Great Fire in 1871 to the present, Manierre Dawson, László Moholy-Nagy, and Ivan Albright to Chris Ware, Anne Wilson, and Theaster Gates. The first single-volume history of art and artists in Chicago, the book--in recognition of the complexity of the story it tells--doesn't follow a single continuous trajectory. Rather, it presents an overlapping sequence of interrelated narratives that together tell a full and nuanced, yet wholly accessible history of visual art in the city. From the temptingly blank canvas left by the Fire, we loop back to the 1830s and on up through the 1860s, tracing the beginnings of the city's institutional and professional art world and community. From there, we travel in chronological order through the decades to the present. Familiar developments--such as the founding of the Art Institute, the Armory Show, and the arrival of the Bauhaus--are given a fresh look, while less well-known aspects of the story, like the contributions of African American artists dating back to the 1860s or the long history of activist art, finally get suitable recognition. The six chapters, each written by an expert in the period, brilliantly mix narrative and image, weaving in oral histories from artists and critics reflecting on their work in the city, and setting new movements and key works in historical context. The final chapter, comprised of interviews and conversations with contemporary artists, brings the story up to the present, offering a look at the vibrant art being created in the city now and addressing ongoing debates about what it means to identify as--or resist identifying as--a Chicago artist today. The result is an unprecedentedly inclusive and rich tapestry, one that reveals Chicago art in all its variety and vigor--and one that will surprise and enlighten even the most dedicated fan of the city's artistic heritage. Part of the Terra Foundation for American Art's year-long Art Design Chicago initiative, which will bring major arts events to venues throughout Chicago in 2018, Art in Chicago is a landmark publication, a book that will be the standard account of Chicago art for decades to come. No art fan--regardless of their city--will want to miss it.

Museum Education at the Art Institute of Chicago

Museum Education at the Art Institute of Chicago

  • Author: Art Institute of Chicago
  • Publisher: University of Illinois Press
  • ISBN: 9780865592025
  • Category: Art
  • Page: 96
  • View: 8581
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This special issue of Museum Studies explores the broad history and practice of art education at the Art Institute, charting the museum's past, present, and future vision of what museum education can be and do. Drawing from a rich trove of archival, oral, and photographic resources, authors offer a lively account of museum education as an evolving profession, an outlet for aesthetic and political programs, and a crucial element of the Art Institute's public mission from the moment of its founding in 1879. The project, sponsored by the Woman's Board of The Art Institute of Chicago to commemorate its fiftieth anniversary, also explores that group's signal commitment to education and volunteerism at the museum, which has ranged from creating suburban community associations to sponsoring a corps of volunteer docents, from establishing a pioneering children's museum to planning celebrations that open the Art Institute's doors to the widest possible public. A pathbreaking effort, this publication constitutes an important, unique contribution to the history of education in American cultural institutions.

The Essential "New Art Examiner"

The Essential

  • Author: Terri Griffith,Kathryn Born,Janet Koplos
  • Publisher: Cornell University Press
  • ISBN: 1609090373
  • Category: Art
  • Page: 351
  • View: 7387
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The New Art Examiner was the only successful art magazine ever to come out of Chicago. It had nearly a three-decade long run, and since its founding in 1974 by Jane Addams Allen and Derek Guthrie, no art periodical published in the Windy City has lasted longer or has achieved the critical mass of readers and admirers that it did. The Essential New Art Examiner gathers the most memorable and celebrated articles from this seminal publication. First a newspaper, then a magazine, the New Art Examiner succeeded unlike no other periodical of its time. Before the word "blog" was ever spoken, it was the source of news and information for Chicago-area artists. And as its reputation grew, the New Art Examiner gained a national audience and exercised influence far beyond the Midwest. As one critic put it, "it fought beyond its weight class." The articles in The Essential New Art Examiner are organized chronologically. Each section of the book begins with a new essay by the original editor of the pieces therein that reconsiders the era and larger issues at play in the art world when they were first published. The result is a fascinating portrait of the individuals who ran the New Art Examiner and an inside look at the artistic trends and aesthetic agendas that guided it. Derek Guthrie and Jane Addams Allen, for instance, had their own renegade style. James Yood never shied away from a good fight. And Ann Wiens was heralded for embracing technologies and design. The story of the New Art Examiner is the story of a constantly evolving publication, shaped by talented editors and the times in which it was printed. Now, more than three decades after the journal's founding, The Essential New Art Examiner brings together the best examples of this groundbreaking publication: great editing, great writing, a feisty staff who changed and adapted as circumstances dictated—a publication that rolled with the times and the art of the times. With passion, insight, and editorial brilliance, the staff of the New Art Examiner turned a local magazine into a national institution.

Jeff Koons

Jeff Koons

  • Author: Francesco Bonami,Museum of Contemporary Art (Chicago, Ill.)
  • Publisher: Yale University Press
  • ISBN: N.A
  • Category: Art
  • Page: 132
  • View: 8107
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In 1975, a young art student named Jeff Koons (b. 1955) moved to Chicago, where he studied at the School of the Art Institute; worked as a studio assistant to his hero, painter Ed Paschke, for $1 an hour; and socialized with many of the city’s most talented artists. This handsome book takes a fresh look at the rise and career of Jeff Koons, who is now arguably one of the world’s most famous artists. Koons collaborated extensively on this book, which accompanies the first solo museum exhibition in the U.S. in 16 years and offers a survey of nearly thirty years of his work, beginning with iconic sculptures from 1979 to new paintings completed in 2007. Francesco Bonami reconsiders his career, making intriguing connections to the work of Andy Warhol, A. A. Milne, Marcel Duchamp, and Gustave Courbet, among others. This is the first publication to explore a little-known but highly influential period in the artist’s career––his time in Chicago in the 1970s. It also provides an accessible and comprehensive introduction to Koons’s work for new audiences and short texts about each of his series and many major works.

Art, Women, California 1950-2000

Art, Women, California 1950-2000

Parallels and Intersections

  • Author: Diana Burgess Fuller,Daniela Salvioni,Deborah Munk,Gail Tsukiyama
  • Publisher: Univ of California Press
  • ISBN: 9780520230668
  • Category: Art
  • Page: 386
  • View: 3187
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"This is the book on women's art I've been waiting for--smart, deeply rooted, and up-to-date, with an overdue focus on women of color that fills in the historical cracks. Read it and run with it."--Lucy R. Lippard, author of The Pink Glass Swan: Selected Essays on Feminist Art "More than merely beautiful and ground-breaking, Art/ Women/ California 1950-2000 is also about the enriching interventions created by diverse women artists, the effect of whose work is not only far-reaching, but has also opened up the very definition of American art. It is about intellectual interdisciplinality and the dialectical relationship between art and social context. It is about the way various California cultures--Native, Latino, Asian, feminist, immigrant, politically active, and virtual, which are so different from the trope of the Western cowboy--have intervened in that entity we imagine as 'America.' "--Elaine Kim, editor of Dangerous Women: Gender and Korean Nationalism "Rich and provocative. A pleasure to read and to look at."--Linda Nochlin, author of The Body in Pieces: The Fragment as a Metaphor of Modernity "This book should greatly help everyone understand the remarkably diversified evolution of art in California, which is largely due to the great influx of women and the transformative effect of a new feminist consciousness."--Arthur C. Danto, author of Philosophizing Art: Selected Essays

A World History of Art

A World History of Art

  • Author: Hugh Honour,John Fleming
  • Publisher: Laurence King Publishing
  • ISBN: 9781856694513
  • Category: Art
  • Page: 936
  • View: 9727
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Expanded to include the latest discoveries in prehistoric art as well as the most recent developments in non-Western and modern art, this is an up-to-date and wide ranging history of art.

PressPLAY

PressPLAY

Contemporary Artists in Conversation

  • Author: N.A
  • Publisher: Phaidon
  • ISBN: N.A
  • Category: Art
  • Page: 714
  • View: 8225
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A personal encounter with 50 of the world's most significant contemporary artists, pressPLAY draws together the full texts of the complete Phaidon interviews with artists since 1995. From highly established artists such as Louise Bourgeois and Alex Katz to midcareer masters such as Fischli and Weiss and Jenny Holzer to the most exciting artists of the current generation such as Maurizio Cattelan and Pipilotti Rist, the artists in pressPLAY work in every variety of media - from painting to video, sculpture to installation. In discussion with key art critics as well as fellow artists, novelists, musicians and theorists, together the players in pressPLAY explain in full what it means to be an artist today. Highlights include veteran painter Vija Celmins and noted sculptor Robert Gober in an intimate discussion on their differing art practices; longtime friends and fellow travellers for decades, Benjamin Buchloh and Lawrence Weiner recall 35 years of work in the definitive, career-long interview for this key conceptual artist; the late Sir Ernst Gombrich in a discussion with the UK's pre-eminent sculptor Antony Gormley, who confesses that it was Gombrich's Story of Art that first inspired him to become an artist; the taciturn, legendary Raymond Pettibon muses on the evolution of his work with noted novelist Dennis Cooper; musician-artist Christian Marclay discusses performance, music and art with Kim Gordon from the legendary rock band Sonic Youth .

The Other Blacklist

The Other Blacklist

The African American Literary and Cultural Left of the 1950s

  • Author: Mary Helen Washington
  • Publisher: Columbia University Press
  • ISBN: 0231526474
  • Category: Literary Criticism
  • Page: 368
  • View: 4679
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Mary Helen Washington recovers the vital role of 1950s leftist politics in the works and lives of modern African American writers and artists. While most histories of McCarthyism focus on the devastation of the blacklist and the intersection of leftist politics and American culture, few include the activities of radical writers and artists from the Black Popular Front. Washington's work incorporates these black intellectuals back into our understanding of mid-twentieth-century African American literature and art and expands our understanding of the creative ferment energizing all of America during this period. Mary Helen Washington reads four representative writers—Lloyd Brown, Frank London Brown, Alice Childress, and Gwendolyn Brooks—and surveys the work of the visual artist Charles White. She traces resonances of leftist ideas and activism in their artistic achievements and follows their balanced critique of the mainstream liberal and conservative political and literary spheres. Her study recounts the targeting of African American as well as white writers during the McCarthy era, reconstructs the events of the 1959 Black Writers' Conference in New York, and argues for the ongoing influence of the Black Popular Front decades after it folded. Defining the contours of a distinctly black modernism and its far-ranging radicalization of American politics and culture, Washington fundamentally reorients scholarship on African American and Cold War literature and life.