Search results for: austrians-and-jews-in-the-twentieth-century

Austrians and Jews in the Twentieth Century

Author : Robert S. Wistrich
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The relationship between Austrians and Jews in the twentieth-century has been tragic. In the age of Franz Joseph, Jews achieved a degree of security, although their position was already being undermined by antisemitism, ethnic conflicts and nationalism. This book examines the relationship between Austrians and Jews which culminated in the 1938 Anschluss and the Holocaust. It also shows how antisemitism survived the War and how the ground was prepared for the international isolation of Austria during the Waldheim Affair.

The Kreisky Era in Austria

Author : Günter Bischof
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The Kreisky Era in Austria, spanning the years 1970 to 1983, is dedicated to one of the country's greatest statesmen of the postwar period. Bruno Kreisky survived Viennese anti-Semitism, and came to dominate postwar Austrian politics. His career spans the turmoil that has confounded Austrian history throughout the twentieth century. Through his Middle East, detente, and third world initiatives, Kreisky achieved world-class status as a statesman during the cold war. These chapters provide the first scholarly assessment of the Kreisky era. Contributors cover a variety of issues in Austrian politics and many aspects of Kreisky's career. Pierre Secher analyzes Kreisky's paradoxical relationship with Jews and Israel. Otmar Holl traces the Austrian's brilliant and controversial career in foreign policy. Peter Ulram demonstrates how deeply Kreisky transformed Austria with his policies of modernization, secularization, and liberalization. Oliver Rathkolb shows how American presidents since Truman have both admired and detested the bold and creative initiatives emanating from Vienna. Susan Howell and Anton Pelinka compare American and European populist right-wing politics, putting David Duke and Jorg Halder in their respective political contexts. The new "forum" section presents heated debates on the future of Austrian neutrality and the 1955 State Treaty. The "forum" will become a regular feature in this series. Included in this comprehensive volume are review essays, book reviews, and a summary of Austrian politics in 1992. The Kreisky Era in Austria will be of interest to foreign policy analysts, historians, and scholars of Central European politics.

Karl Kraus

Author : Wilma Abeles Iggers
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Broken Threads

Author : Roberta S. Kremer
File Size : 51.17 MB
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A historical account of the impact of Nazism on Jewish fashion reveals how the early twentieth century fashion industry in Germany and Austria was a thriving business that was subjected to boycotts and Aryanization when the Reich determined that it was too heavily influenced by Jewish designers, manufacturers, and merchandisers. 10,000 first printing.

Constructing Nationalities in East Central Europe

Author : Judson Rozenblit
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The hundred years between the revolutions of 1848 and the population transfers of the mid-twentieth century saw the nationalization of culturally complex societies in East Central Europe. This fact has variously been explained in terms of modernization, state building and nation-building theories, each of which treats the process of nationalization as something inexorable, a necessary component of modernity. Although more recently social scientists gesture to the contingencies that may shape these larger developments, this structural approach makes scholars far less attentive to the "hard work" (ideological, political, social) undertaken by individuals and groups at every level of society who tried themselves to build "national" societies. The essays in this volume make us aware of how complex, multi-dimensional and often contradictory this nationalization process in East Central Europe actually was. The authors document attempts and failures by nationalist politicians, organizations, activists and regimes from 1848 through 1948 to give East-Central Europeans a strong sense of national self-identification. They remind us that only the use of dictatorial powers in the 20th century could actually transform the fantasy of nationalization into a reality, albeit a brutal one.

Contemporary Jewish Writing in Austria

Author : Dagmar C. G. Lorenz
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Devoted to collecting the finest Jewish writing from around the world, the Jewish Writing in the Contemporary World series consists of anthologies, by country, that are designed to present to the English-speaking world authors and works deserving international consideration. As a series, the books permit a broad examination of the international crosscurrents in Jewish thought and culture.øContemporary Jewish Writing in Austria presents a gathering of writers from several generations who have published a remarkable range of works in recent decades. The result is a diverse portrait of Jewish experience in Austria since the Second World War. Dagmar C. G. Lorenz has assembled an extraordinary roster of literary talents, ranging from authors born in the early decades of this century to writers born after the Shoah. The volume maps a complex tradition of Jewish discourse marked by a profound awareness of the literary past, by the failure of a long-anticipated Austrian-Jewish symbiosis, and by the unparalleled tragedy of the Shoah. It is a modern tradition that has made an essential contribution to Austria?s literary history while remaining, in Lorenz?s words, "distinct and unassimilated."

History of the Twentieth Century

Author : Martin Gilbert
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A chronological compilation of twentieth-century world events in one volume—from the acclaimed historian and biographer of Winston Churchill. The twentieth century has been one of the most unique in human history. It has seen the rise of some of humanity’s most important advances to date, as well as many of its most violent and terrifying wars. This is a condensed version of renowned historian Martin Gilbert’s masterful examination of the century’s history, offering the highlights of a three-volume work that covers more than three thousand pages. From the invention of aviation to the rise of the Internet, and from events and cataclysmic changes in Europe to those in Asia, Africa, and North America, Martin examines art, literature, war, religion, life and death, and celebration and renewal across the globe, and throughout this turbulent and astonishing century.

Austria in the Twentieth Century

Author : Rolf Steininger
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These fourteen essays by leading Austrian historians and political scientists serve as a basic introduction to a small but sometimes trend-setting European country. They provide a basic up-to-date outline of Austria's political history, shedding light on economic and social trends as well. No European country has experienced more dramatic turning points in its twentieth-century history than Austria. This volume divides the century into three periods. The five essays of Section I deal with the years 1900-1938. Under the relative tranquility of the late Habsburg monarchy seethed a witch's brew of social and political trends, signaling the advent of modernity and leading to the outbreak of World War I and eventually to the collapse of the Habsburg Empire. The First Austrian Republic was one of the succession states that tried to build a nation against the backdrop of political and economic crisis and simmering civil war between the various political camps. Democracy collapsed in 1933 and an authoritarian regime attempted to prevail against pressures from Nazi Germany and Nazis at home. The two essays in Section II cover World War II (1938-1945). In 1938, Hitler's "Third Reich" annexed Austria and the population was pulled into the cauldron of World War II, fighting and collaborating with the Nazis, and also resisting and fleeing them. The seven essays of Section III concentrate on the Second Republic (1945 to the present). After ten years of four-power Allied occupation, Austria regained her sovereignty with the Austrian State Treaty of 1955. The price paid was neutrality. Unlike the turmoil of the prewar years, Austria became a "normal" nation with a functioning democracy, one building toward economic prosperity. After the collapse of the "iron curtain" in 1989, Austria turned westward, joining the European Union in 1995. Most recently, with the advent of populist politics, Austria's political system has experienced a sea of change departing from its political economy of a huge state-owned sector and social partnership as well as Proporz. This informed and insightful volume will serve as a textbook in courses on Austrian, German and European history, as well as in comparative European politics.

Austria in the Twentieth Century

Author : Gino Germani
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These fourteen essays by leading Austrian historians and political scientists serve as a basic introduction to a small but sometimes trend-setting European country. They provide a basic up-to-date outline of Austria's political history, shedding light on economic and social trends as well. No European country has experienced more dramatic turning points in its twentieth-century history than Austria. This volume divides the century into three periods. The five essays of Section I deal with the years 1900-1938. Under the relative tranquility of the late Habsburg monarchy seethed a witch's brew of social and political trends, signaling the advent of modernity and leading to the outbreak of World War I and eventually to the collapse of the Habsburg Empire. The First Austrian Republic was one of the succession states that tried to build a nation against the backdrop of political and economic crisis and simmering civil war between the various political camps. Democracy collapsed in 1933 and an authoritarian regime attempted to prevail against pressures from Nazi Germany and Nazis at home. The two essays in Section II cover World War II (1938-1945). In 1938, Hitler's "Third Reich" annexed Austria and the population was pulled into the cauldron of World War II, fighting and collaborating with the Nazis, and also resisting and fleeing them. The seven essays of Section III concentrate on the Second Republic (1945 to the present). After ten years of four-power Allied occupation, Austria regained her sovereignty with the Austrian State Treaty of 1955. The price paid was neutrality. Unlike the turmoil of the prewar years, Austria became a "normal" nation with a functioning democracy, one building toward economic prosperity. After the collapse of the "iron curtain" in 1989, Austria turned westward, joining the European Union in 1995. Most recently, with the advent of populist politics, Austria's political system has experienced a sea of change departing from its political economy of a huge state-owned sector and social partnership as well as Proporz. This informed and insightful volume will serve as a textbook in courses on Austrian, German and European history, as well as in comparative European politics.

The Habsburg Empire

Author : Pieter M. Judson
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This panoramic reappraisal shows why the Habsburg Empire mattered for so long to so many Central Europeans across divides of language, religion, and region. Pieter Judson shows that creative government—and intractable problems the far-flung empire could not solve—left an enduring imprint on successor states. Its lessons are no less important today.