Search results for: austrians-and-jews-in-the-twentieth-century

Austrians and Jews in the Twentieth Century

Author : Robert S. Wistrich
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The relationship between Austrians and Jews in the twentieth-century has been tragic. In the age of Franz Joseph, Jews achieved a degree of security, although their position was already being undermined by antisemitism, ethnic conflicts and nationalism. This book examines the relationship between Austrians and Jews which culminated in the 1938 Anschluss and the Holocaust. It also shows how antisemitism survived the War and how the ground was prepared for the international isolation of Austria during the Waldheim Affair.

The Kreisky Era in Austria

Author : Günter Bischof
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The Kreisky Era in Austria, spanning the years 1970 to 1983, is dedicated to one of the country's greatest statesmen of the postwar period. Bruno Kreisky survived Viennese anti-Semitism, and came to dominate postwar Austrian politics. His career spans the turmoil that has confounded Austrian history throughout the twentieth century. Through his Middle East, detente, and third world initiatives, Kreisky achieved world-class status as a statesman during the cold war. These chapters provide the first scholarly assessment of the Kreisky era. Contributors cover a variety of issues in Austrian politics and many aspects of Kreisky's career. Pierre Secher analyzes Kreisky's paradoxical relationship with Jews and Israel. Otmar Holl traces the Austrian's brilliant and controversial career in foreign policy. Peter Ulram demonstrates how deeply Kreisky transformed Austria with his policies of modernization, secularization, and liberalization. Oliver Rathkolb shows how American presidents since Truman have both admired and detested the bold and creative initiatives emanating from Vienna. Susan Howell and Anton Pelinka compare American and European populist right-wing politics, putting David Duke and Jorg Halder in their respective political contexts. The new "forum" section presents heated debates on the future of Austrian neutrality and the 1955 State Treaty. The "forum" will become a regular feature in this series. Included in this comprehensive volume are review essays, book reviews, and a summary of Austrian politics in 1992. The Kreisky Era in Austria will be of interest to foreign policy analysts, historians, and scholars of Central European politics.

My 20th Century

Author : Miklos Breuer
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The experiences of Miki Breuer, starting with his parents' life in the turn-of-the-century Austro-Hungarian Empire, his childhood in pre-war Budapest, his experiences during the Second World War, his life in the newly created State of Israel and finally, his arrival in the USA in the early sixties.

Thomas Bernhard

Author : Gitta Honegger
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Thomas Bernhard (1931-1989), a literary figure of international acclaim and arguably Austria's greatest post-World War II writer, became the first of his generation to expose unrelentingly his country's pathological denial of complicity in the Holocaust. Bernhard's writings and indeed his own biography reflect Austria's fraught efforts to define itself as a nation following the collapse of the Habsburg monarchy and the trauma of World War II. Repeatedly he scandalised the nation with novels, plays, and public statements that exposed the convoluted ways Austrians were attempting to come to terms with their Nazi past, or defiantly avoiding doing so. This book, the first comprehensive biography of Thomas. Bernhard in English, examines his life and work and their intricate relationship to Austria's geographical, political, and cultural transformations in the twentieth century. While Bernhard was the scourge of his native culture, Gitta Honegger explains, he was also a product of that same culture. Appreciation of his controversial impact on his society is possible only through an understanding of the contradictions, the shame, and the achievements that mark Austrians' self-perception i

Austria in the Twentieth Century

Author : Rolf Steininger
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These fourteen essays by leading Austrian historians and political scientists serve as a basic introduction to a small but sometimes trend-setting European country. They provide a basic up-to-date outline of Austria's political history, shedding light on economic and social trends as well. No European country has experienced more dramatic turning points in its twentieth-century history than Austria. This volume divides the century into three periods. The five essays of Section I deal with the years 1900-1938. Under the relative tranquility of the late Habsburg monarchy seethed a witch's brew of social and political trends, signaling the advent of modernity and leading to the outbreak of World War I and eventually to the collapse of the Habsburg Empire. The First Austrian Republic was one of the succession states that tried to build a nation against the backdrop of political and economic crisis and simmering civil war between the various political camps. Democracy collapsed in 1933 and an authoritarian regime attempted to prevail against pressures from Nazi Germany and Nazis at home. The two essays in Section II cover World War II (1938-1945). In 1938, Hitler's "Third Reich" annexed Austria and the population was pulled into the cauldron of World War II, fighting and collaborating with the Nazis, and also resisting and fleeing them. The seven essays of Section III concentrate on the Second Republic (1945 to the present). After ten years of four-power Allied occupation, Austria regained her sovereignty with the Austrian State Treaty of 1955. The price paid was neutrality. Unlike the turmoil of the prewar years, Austria became a "normal" nation with a functioning democracy, one building toward economic prosperity. After the collapse of the "iron curtain" in 1989, Austria turned westward, joining the European Union in 1995. Most recently, with the advent of populist politics, Austria's political system has experienced a sea of change departing from its political economy of a huge state-owned sector and social partnership as well as Proporz. This informed and insightful volume will serve as a textbook in courses on Austrian, German and European history, as well as in comparative European politics.

Austria in the Twentieth Century

Author : Gino Germani
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These fourteen essays by leading Austrian historians and political scientists serve as a basic introduction to a small but sometimes trend-setting European country. They provide a basic up-to-date outline of Austria's political history, shedding light on economic and social trends as well. No European country has experienced more dramatic turning points in its twentieth-century history than Austria. This volume divides the century into three periods. The five essays of Section I deal with the years 1900-1938. Under the relative tranquility of the late Habsburg monarchy seethed a witch's brew of social and political trends, signaling the advent of modernity and leading to the outbreak of World War I and eventually to the collapse of the Habsburg Empire. The First Austrian Republic was one of the succession states that tried to build a nation against the backdrop of political and economic crisis and simmering civil war between the various political camps. Democracy collapsed in 1933 and an authoritarian regime attempted to prevail against pressures from Nazi Germany and Nazis at home. The two essays in Section II cover World War II (1938-1945). In 1938, Hitler's "Third Reich" annexed Austria and the population was pulled into the cauldron of World War II, fighting and collaborating with the Nazis, and also resisting and fleeing them. The seven essays of Section III concentrate on the Second Republic (1945 to the present). After ten years of four-power Allied occupation, Austria regained her sovereignty with the Austrian State Treaty of 1955. The price paid was neutrality. Unlike the turmoil of the prewar years, Austria became a "normal" nation with a functioning democracy, one building toward economic prosperity. After the collapse of the "iron curtain" in 1989, Austria turned westward, joining the European Union in 1995. Most recently, with the advent of populist politics, Austria's political system has experienced a sea of change departing from its political economy of a huge state-owned sector and social partnership as well as Proporz. This informed and insightful volume will serve as a textbook in courses on Austrian, German and European history, as well as in comparative European politics.

Karl Kraus

Author : Wilma Abeles Iggers
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The Jews in the Twentieth Century

Author : Martin Gilbert
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Describes the people and events that impacted the Jewish people in the twentieth century; explores Jewish societies in Europe, the Middle East, Africa, and America; and discusses the holocaust and the re-flourishing of the Jewish community.

Austria and America 20th Century Cross Cultural Encounters

Author : Joshua Parker
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Through literature, film, diplomatic relations, and academic exchanges, this volume examines key historical points in Austrian-American relations of the past century, pondering the roots of how and why "austrianness" was adapted to American culture, and how America's cultural lens focused on the two countries' exchanges. From Freud's early reception, to FDR's policy toward Austrian refugees in the Pacific, and from film adaptations to film-writing, literature and Freudianism during the McCarthy era, it reviews encounters between Austria and the United States, between Austrians and Americans, between each's images of the other, and the lives of those caught in between. (Series: American Studies in Austria, Vol. 15) [Subject: Politics, American Studies, Austrian Studies, Sociology]

Contemporary Jewish Writing in Austria

Author : Dagmar C. G. Lorenz
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Devoted to collecting the finest Jewish writing from around the world, the Jewish Writing in the Contemporary World series consists of anthologies, by country, that are designed to present to the English-speaking world authors and works deserving international consideration. As a series, the books permit a broad examination of the international crosscurrents in Jewish thought and culture.øContemporary Jewish Writing in Austria presents a gathering of writers from several generations who have published a remarkable range of works in recent decades. The result is a diverse portrait of Jewish experience in Austria since the Second World War. Dagmar C. G. Lorenz has assembled an extraordinary roster of literary talents, ranging from authors born in the early decades of this century to writers born after the Shoah. The volume maps a complex tradition of Jewish discourse marked by a profound awareness of the literary past, by the failure of a long-anticipated Austrian-Jewish symbiosis, and by the unparalleled tragedy of the Shoah. It is a modern tradition that has made an essential contribution to Austria?s literary history while remaining, in Lorenz?s words, "distinct and unassimilated."