Search results for: carrying-the-darkness-the-poetry-of-the-vietnam-war

Carrying the Darkness

Author : William Daniel Ehrhart
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An unusual collection of poems, mostly by Vietnam War veterans, most of which have never been published before.

Carrying the Darkness

Author : William Daniel Ehrhart
File Size : 68.39 MB
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An anthology of Vietnam War poetry, featuring the work of seventy-five poets.

Dismantling Glory

Author : Lorrie Goldensohn
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Dismantling Glory presents the most personal and powerful words ever written about the horrors of battle, by the very soldiers who put their lives on the line. Focusing on American and English poetry from World War I, World War II, and the Vietnam War, Lorrie Goldensohn, a poet and pacifist, affirms that by and large, twentieth-century war poetry is fundamentally antiwar. She examines the changing nature of the war lyric and takes on the literary thinking of two countries separated by their common language. World War I poets such as Wilfred Owen emphasized the role of soldier as victim. By World War II, however, English and American poets, influenced by the leftist politics of W. H. Auden, tended to indict the whole of society, not just its leaders, for militarism. During the Vietnam War, soldier poets accepted themselves as both victims and perpetrators of war's misdeeds, writing a nontraditional, more personally candid war poetry. The book not only discusses the poetry of trench warfare but also shows how the lives of civilians—women and children in particular—entered a global war poetry dominated by air power, invasion, and occupation. Goldensohn argues that World War II blurred the boundaries between battleground and home front, thus bringing women and civilians into war discourse as never before. She discusses the interplay of fascination and disapproval in the texts of twentieth-century war and notes the way in which homage to war hero and victim contends with revulsion at war's horror and waste. In addition to placing the war lyric in literary and historical context, the book discusses in detail individual poets such as Wilfred Owen, W. H. Auden, Keith Douglas, Randall Jarrell, and a group of poets from the Vietnam War, including W. D. Ehrhart, Bruce Weigl, Yusef Komunyakaa, David Huddle, and Doug Anderson. Dismantling Glory is an original and compelling look at the way twentieth-century war poetry posited new relations between masculinity and war, changed and complicated the representation of war, and expanded the scope of antiwar thinking.

The Last Time I Dreamed About the War

Author : Jean-Jacques Malo
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This is a collection of essays on the life and writing of W.D. Ehrhart, poet, essayist, memoirist and teacher. The twenty contributors--scholars, publishers, poets--are from the U.S., France, Britain, the Netherlands, Austria, India and Japan. Some are Vietnam or Iraq war veterans. The collection overall studies various aspects of Ehrhart's writing, as well as his direct influence on the lives of people, both as a writer and as a teacher. The volume concludes with a selection of Ehrhart poems chosen by the contributors because they embody some quality discussed in the essays. The book includes a selected bibliography of Bill Ehrhart's published writings.

The Last Time I Dreamed About the War

Author : Jean-Jacques Malo
File Size : 37.20 MB
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This is a collection of essays on the life and writing of W.D. Ehrhart, poet, essayist, memoirist and teacher. The twenty contributors—scholars, publishers, poets—are from the U.S., France, Britain, the Netherlands, Austria, India and Japan. Some are Vietnam or Iraq war veterans. The collection overall studies various aspects of Ehrhart’s writing, as well as his direct influence on the lives of people, both as a writer and as a teacher. The volume concludes with a selection of Ehrhart poems chosen by the contributors because they embody some quality discussed in the essays. The book includes a selected bibliography of Bill Ehrhart’s published writings.

Understanding and Teaching the Vietnam War

Author : John Day Tully
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Part One: Reflections on Teaching the Vietnam War. - Part Two: Methods and Sources. - Part Three: Understanding and Teaching Specific Content.

Friendly Fire American Images of the Vietnam War

Author : Riverside Katherine Kinney Associate Professor of English University of California
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Hundreds of memoirs, novels, plays, and movies have been devoted to the American war in Vietnam. In spite of the great variety of mediums, political perspectives and the degrees of seriousness with which the war has been treated, Katherine Kinney argues that the vast majority of these works share a single story: that of Americans killing Americans in Vietnam. Friendly Fire, in this instance, refers not merely to a tragic error of war, it also refers to America's war with itself during the Vietnam years. Starting from this point, this book considers the concept of "friendly fire" from multiple vantage points, and portrays the Vietnam age as a crucible where America's cohesive image of itself is shattered--pitting soldiers against superiors, doves against hawks, feminism against patriarchy, racial fear against racial tolerance. Through the use of extensive evidence from the film and popular fiction of Vietnam (i.e. Kovic's Born on the Fourth of July, Didion's Democracy, O'Brien's Going After Cacciato, Rabe's Sticks and Bones and Streamers), Kinney draws a powerful picture of a nation politically, culturally, and socially divided, and a war that has been memorialized as a contested site of art, media, politics, and ideology.

Gale Researcher Guide for The Vietnam War in Literature and Its Aftermath

Author : Catherine Calloway
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Gale Researcher Guide for: The Vietnam War in Literature and Its Aftermath is selected from Gale's academic platform Gale Researcher. These study guides provide peer-reviewed articles that allow students early success in finding scholarly materials and to gain the confidence and vocabulary needed to pursue deeper research.

The Columbia Guide to the Vietnam War

Author : David L. Anderson
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More than a quarter of a century after the last Marine Corps Huey left the American embassy in Saigon, the lessons and legacies of the most divisive war in twentieth-century American history are as hotly debated as ever. Why did successive administrations choose little-known Vietnam as the "test case" of American commitment in the fight against communism? Why were the "best and brightest" apparently blind to the illegitimacy of the state of South Vietnam? Would Kennedy have pulled out had he lived? And what lessons regarding American foreign policy emerged from the war? The Columbia Guide to the Vietnam War helps readers understand this tragic and complex conflict. The book contains both interpretive information and a wealth of facts in easy-to-find form. Part I provides a lucid narrative overview of contested issues and interpretations in Vietnam scholarship. Part II is a mini-encyclopedia with descriptions and analysis of individuals, events, groups, and military operations. Arranged alphabetically, this section enables readers to look up isolated facts and specialized terms. Part III is a chronology of key events. Part IV is an annotated guide to resources, including films, documentaries, CD-ROMs, and reliable Web sites. Part V contains excerpts from historical documents and statistical data.

Radical Visions

Author : Vicente F. Gotera
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Although poets have written about warfare since at least the time of Homer, the Vietnam war has struck many observers as being immune to the interpretations of poetry and myth. "Lyric poetry of a traditional kind," writes one critic, "has proved inappropriate to communicate the character of the Vietnam war, its remoteness, its jargonized recapitulations, its seeming imperviousness to aesthetics." Nonetheless, the past two decades have seen an unprecedented outpouring of poetry that seeks to describe and come to terms with that bitterly divisive conflict. In Radical Visions Vince Gotera argues that poetry written by Vietnam veterans underlines the failure of traditional American myths to help Americans understand the war and its aftermath. The book blends sociohistorical commentary with close readings of individual works by such poets as Michael Casey, Walter McDonald, and W. D. Ehrhart. In the book's first section, "The 'Nam," Gotera examines several key mythic structures--the Wild West (a violent extension of the mythic virgin land), the machine in the garden, the city on the hill, regeneration through violence--all of which helped delude Americans about Vietnam and the war being fought there. In the second part, "The World," Gotera shows how another myth, the American Adam as an exemplar of ahistorical innocence, proved unusable for returning veterans attempting to readjust to American life. In addition to exposing these failed myths, Gotera argues, the poetry by Vietnam veterans reflects an effort to construct new myths--most notably that of the "warrior against war," an oxymoronic structure arising from the difficulties faced by returning veterans. In the book's final chapters, Gotera examines the work of Bruce Weigl and Yusef Komunyakaa, two poets whom the author considers most successful at portraying the moral absurdity of the Vietnam war without sacrificing lyrical aesthetics. The first comprehensive study devoted exclusively to poetry by Vietnam veterans, Radical Visions argues that this body of writing registers an important advance in the aesthetics and poetics of war literature and offers a cogent antiwar statement rooted in personal experience.