Search Results for "climate-justice"

Climate Justice

Climate Justice

Vulnerability and Protection

  • Author: Henry Shue
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
  • ISBN: 0198713703
  • Category: Political Science
  • Page: 353
  • View: 8817
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Climate change is the most difficult threat facing humanity in the 21st century, and negotiations to reach international agreement on how to control climate change have so far foundered on deep issues of justice. Henry Shue, a practical philosopher who has been analysing the moral and political issues confronting all attempts at multilateral cooperation in tackling climate change as they have evolved over the last twenty years since negotiations began, offershere seventeen careful, lucid and highly accessible essays on the central questions. Policy-makers as well as students of moral philosophy and political theory will find provocative and imaginativeproposed answers to key questions of justice that are based in moral reasons informed by political insight and scientific understanding and that offer a way forward.

Climate Justice

Climate Justice

Hope, Resilience, and the Fight for a Sustainable Future

  • Author: Mary Robinson
  • Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing
  • ISBN: 1408888459
  • Category: Science
  • Page: 176
  • View: 9799
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An urgent call to arms by one of the most important voices in the international fight against climate change, sharing inspiring stories and offering vital lessons for the path forward Holding her first grandchild in her arms in 2003, Mary Robinson was struck by the uncertainty of the world he had been born into. Before his fiftieth birthday, he would share the planet with more than nine billion people – people battling for food, water, and shelter in an increasingly volatile climate. The faceless, shadowy menace of climate change had become, in an instant, deeply personal. Mary Robinson's mission would lead her all over the world, from Malawi to Mongolia, and to a heartening revelation: that an irrepressible driving force in the battle for climate justice could be found at the grassroots level, mainly among women, many of them mothers and grandmothers like herself. From Sharon Hanshaw, the Mississippi matriarch whose campaign began in her East Biloxi hair salon and culminated in her speaking at the United Nations, to Constance Okollet, a small farmer who transformed the fortunes of her ailing community in rural Uganda, Robinson met with ordinary people whose resilience and ingenuity had already unlocked extraordinary change. Powerful and deeply humane, Climate Justice is a stirring manifesto on one of the most pressing humanitarian issues of our time, and a lucid, affirmative, and well-argued case for hope.

Climate Justice

Climate Justice

An Introduction

  • Author: Dominic Roser,Christian Seidel
  • Publisher: Taylor & Francis
  • ISBN: 1317209532
  • Category: Philosophy
  • Page: 230
  • View: 2433
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The link between justice and climate change is becoming increasingly prominent in public debates on climate policy. This clear and concise philosophical introduction to climate justice addresses the hot topic of climate change as a moral challenge. Using engaging everyday examples the authors address the core arguments by providing a comprehensive and balanced overview of this heated debate, enabling students and practitioners to think critically about the subject area and to promote discussion on questions such as: Why do anything in the face of climate change? How much do we owe our descendants – a better world, or nothing at all? How should we distribute the burden of climate action between industrialized and developing countries? Should I adopt a green lifestyle even if no one else makes an effort? Which means of reducing emissions are permissible? Should we put hope in technological solutions? Should we re-design democratic institutions for more effective climate policy? With chapter summaries, illustrative examples and suggestions for further reading, this book is an ideal introduction for students in political philosophy, applied ethics and environmental ethics, as well as for practitioners working on one of the most urgent issues of our time.

Climate Justice

Climate Justice

Integrating Economics and Philosophy

  • Author: Ravi Kanbur,Henry Shue
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press
  • ISBN: 0192542702
  • Category: Business & Economics
  • Page: 288
  • View: 605
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Climate justice requires sharing the burdens and benefits of climate change and its resolution equitably and fairly. It brings together justice between generations and justice within generations. In particular it requires that attempts to address justice between generations through various interventions designed to curb greenhouse emissions today do not end up creating injustice in our time by hurting the currently poor and vulnerable. The United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) summit in September 2015, and the Conference of Parties (COP) to the Framework Convention on Climate Change in Paris in December 2015, brought climate change and its development impact centre stage in global discussions. In the run up to Paris, Mary Robinson, former President of Ireland and UN Secretary General's Special Envoy for Climate Change, instituted the Climate Justice Dialogue "to mobilize political will and creative thinking to shape an ambitious and just international climate agreement in 2015". The editors of this volume, an economist and a philosopher, served on the High Level Advisory Committee of the Climate Justice Dialogue. They noted the overlap and mutual enforcement between the economic and philosophical discourses on climate justice. But they also noted the great need for these strands to come together to support the public and policy discourse. Climate Justice: Integrating Economics and Philosophy is the result. Bringing together contributions from economists and philosophers, Climate Justice illustrates the different approaches, how they overlap and interact, and what they have already learned from each other and might still have to learn.

Routledge Handbook of Climate Justice

Routledge Handbook of Climate Justice

  • Author: Tahseen Jafry
  • Publisher: Routledge
  • ISBN: 1134978413
  • Category: Business & Economics
  • Page: 542
  • View: 2253
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The term "climate justice" began to gain traction in the late 1990s following a wide range of activities by social and environmental justice movements that emerged in response to the operations of the fossil fuel industry and, later, to what their members saw as the failed global climate governance model that became so transparent at COP15 in Copenhagen. The term continues to gain momentum in discussions around sustainable development, climate change, mitigation and adaptation, and has been slowly making its way into the world of international and national policy. However, the connections between these remain unestablished. Addressing the need for a comprehensive and integrated reference compendium, The Routledge Handbook of Climate Justice provides students, academics and professionals with a valuable insight into this fast-growing field. Drawing together a multidisciplinary range of authors from the Global North and South, this Handbook addresses some of the most salient topics in current climate justice research, including just transition, urban climate justice and public engagement, in addition to the field’s more traditional focus on gender, international governance and climate ethics. With an emphasis on facilitating learning based on cutting-edge specialised climate justice research and application, each chapter draws from the most recent sources, real-world best practices and tutored reflections on the strategic dimensions of climate justice and its related disciplines. The Routledge Handbook of Climate Justice will be essential reading for students and scholars, as well as being a vital reference tool for those practically engaged in the field.

Climate Justice and the Economy

Climate Justice and the Economy

Social mobilization, knowledge and the political

  • Author: Stefan Gaarsmand Jacobsen
  • Publisher: Routledge
  • ISBN: 1315306174
  • Category: Business & Economics
  • Page: 196
  • View: 5860
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As climate change has increasingly become the main focus of environmentalist activism since the late 1990s, the global economic drivers of CO2 emissions are now a major concern for radical greens. In turn, the emphasis on connected crises in both natural and social systems has attracted more activists to the Climate Justice movement and created a common cause between activists from the Global South and North. In the absence of a pervasive narrative of transnational or socialist economic planning to prevent catastrophic climate change, these activists have been eager to engage with advanced knowledge and ideas on political and economic structures that diminish risks and allow for new climate agency. This book breaks new ground by investigating what kind of economy the Climate Justice movement is calling for us to build and how the struggle for economic change has unfolded so far. Examining ecological debt, just transition, indigenous ecologies, social ecology, community economies and divestment among other topics, the authors provide a critical assessment and a common ground for future debate on economic innovation via social mobilization. Taking a transdisciplinary approach that synthesizes political economy, history, theory and ethnography, this volume will be of great interest to students and scholars of climate justice, environmental politics and policy, environmental economics and sustainable development.

Climate Justice

Climate Justice

A Voice for the Future

  • Author: T. Thorp
  • Publisher: Springer
  • ISBN: 1137394641
  • Category: Social Science
  • Page: 439
  • View: 7720
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In this ground-breaking work, Teresa Thorp tackles the causes and effects of climate injustice by methodically mapping out an approach by which to reach a negotiatedconsensus with legal force to protect present and future generations. Using the law and policy of climate change as a vehicle for illustrating how to shape our future,she comprehensively overturns the widely held contemporary view of climate justice as inconstant charitable acts, relative systemic notions and static concepts isolatedfrom the common good and a congruent rule of law. Responding to the adverse impacts of climate change (heat waves, extended drought, severe flooding anddesertification), which represent an urgent and potentially irreversible threat to human societies and the planet, requires a new and cohesive way of thinking aboutglobal policy and the law. The mission of guaranteeing and realising human dignity, human security and human rights is multi-fold. Looking through the lens of kaleidoscopic normativity, anextensible language anchored in common juridical elements should facilitate how norms enter the socio-legal frame and interact within it. Users need to be able todisplay and interpret the congruent legal norm in order to obey and apply it. Galvanising this process by constitutionalising first principles and consequential normsis vital for attaining fraternity between nations and among all people. divClimate Justice – A Voice for the Future is an essential read for scholars, practitioners and all those genuinely interested in reaching consensus on a post-2015 global climate accord, a unified development agenda and a cohesive pact for disaster-risk reduction.

Climate Justice and Human Rights

Climate Justice and Human Rights

  • Author: Tracey Skillington
  • Publisher: Springer
  • ISBN: 1137022817
  • Category: Political Science
  • Page: 287
  • View: 7150
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This book shows that escalating climate destruction today is not the product of public indifference, but of the blocked democratic freedoms of peoples across the world to resist unwanted degrees of capitalist interference with their ecological fate or capacity to change the course of ecological disaster. The author assesses how this state of affairs might be reversed and the societal relevance of universal human rights rejuvenated. It explores how freedom from want, war, persecution and fear of ecological catastrophe might be better secured in the future through a democratic reorganization of procedures of natural resource management and problem resolution amongst self-determining communities. It looks at how increasing human vulnerability to climate destruction forms the basis of a new peoples-powered demand for greater climate justice, as well as a global movement for preventative action and reflexive societal learning.

Politics of Climate Justice

Politics of Climate Justice

Paralysis Above, Movement Below

  • Author: Patrick Bond
  • Publisher: University of Natal Press
  • ISBN: 9781869142216
  • Category: Nature
  • Page: 267
  • View: 5135
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This is an indispensable book for anyone who seeks to understand world leaders' responses to climate change through the United Nations' Conference of the Parties (COP). Politics of Climate Justice provides the vital background and theoretical context to what happened at the COPS in Kyoto, Copenhagen, Cancun, and Durban. It explores the favored strategies of key elites from the crisis ridden global and national power blocs, including South Africa, and finds them incapable of reconciling the threat to the planet with their economies' addiction to fossil fuels. Finally, the book reveals sites of climate justice and interrogates the new movement's approach.

Environmental Justice

Environmental Justice

Concepts, Evidence and Politics

  • Author: Gordon Walker
  • Publisher: Routledge
  • ISBN: 1136619232
  • Category: Political Science
  • Page: 272
  • View: 8042
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Environmental justice has increasingly become part of the language of environmental activism, political debate, academic research and policy making around the world. It raises questions about how the environment impacts on different people’s lives. Does pollution follow the poor? Are some communities far more vulnerable to the impacts of flooding or climate change than others? Are the benefits of access to green space for all, or only for some? Do powerful voices dominate environmental decisions to the exclusion of others? This book focuses on such questions and the complexities involved in answering them. It explores the diversity of ways in which environment and social difference are intertwined and how the justice of their interrelationship matters. It has a distinctive international perspective, tracing how the discourse of environmental justice has moved around the world and across scales to include global concerns, and examining research, activism and policy development in the US, the UK, South Africa and other countries. The widening scope and diversity of what has been positioned within an environmental justice ‘frame’ is also reflected in chapters that focus on waste, air quality, flooding, urban greenspace and climate change. In each case, the basis for evidence of inequalities in impacts, vulnerabilities and responsibilities is examined, asking questions about the knowledge that is produced, the assumptions involved and the concepts of justice that are being deployed in both academic and political contexts. Environmental Justice offers a wide ranging analysis of this rapidly evolving field, with compelling examples of the processes involved in producing inequalities and the challenges faced in advancing the interests of the disadvantaged. It provides a critical framework for understanding environmental justice in various spatial and political contexts, and will be of interest to those studying Environmental Studies, Geography, Politics and Sociology.