Search results for: consumer-health-informatics

Consumer Health Informatics

Author : Thomas Wetter
File Size : 35.39 MB
Format : PDF, Mobi
Download : 574
Read : 277
Download »
This book offers demographic analysis, client appraisal, trial design, etc along with many examples to inform the conception and critical evaluation of consumer health informatics services. Patient safety, legal and ethical appraisal, and business models add to the systematic coverage. Regarding longevity and increase of chronic diseases traditional medical care faces tremendous financial and human resource problems. Is self-service medicine as follow up of traditional care or as an approach in its own right the answer? Are internet and app stores the place where self service medicine takes place? The book distinguishes stages of such an endeavour.

Consumer Health Informatics

Author : Catherine Arnott Smith
File Size : 50.41 MB
Format : PDF, Docs
Download : 444
Read : 292
Download »
"An engaging introduction to an exciting multidisciplinary field where positive impact depends less on technology than on understanding and responding to human motivations, specific information needs, and life constraints." -- Betsy L. Humphreys, former Deputy Director, National Library of Medicine This is a book for people who want to design or promote information technology that helps people be more active and informed participants in their healthcare. Topics include patient portals, wearable devices, apps, websites, smart homes, and online communities focused on health. Consumer Healthcare Informatics: Enabling Digital Health for Everyone educates readers in the core concepts of consumer health informatics: participatory healthcare; health and e-health literacy; user-centered design; information retrieval and trusted information resources; and the ethical dimensions of health information and communication technologies. It presents the current state of knowledge and recent developments in the field of consumer health informatics. The discussions address tailoring information to key user groups, including patients, consumers, caregivers, parents, children and young adults, and older adults. For example, apps are considered as not just a rich consumer technology with the promise of empowered personal data management and connectedness to community and healthcare providers, but also a domain rife with concerns for effectiveness, privacy, and security, requiring both designer and user to engage in critical thinking around their choices. This book’s unique contribution to the field is its focus on the consumer and patient in the context of their everyday life outside the clinical setting. Discussion of tools and technologies is grounded in this perspective and in a context of real-world use and its implications for design. There is an emphasis on empowerment through participatory and people-centered care.

Consumer Health Informatics

Author : Deborah Lewis
File Size : 44.1 MB
Format : PDF, Kindle
Download : 942
Read : 429
Download »
According to the Pew Foundation’s "Internet in American Life Study," over 60 million Americans per year use the Internet to search for health information. All those concerned with healthcare and how to obtain personally relevant medical information form a large additional target group Many Medical Informatics programs–both in the United States and abroad–include a course in Consumer Health Informatics as part of their curriculum. This book, designed for use in a classroom, will be the first textbook dedicated solely to the specific concerns of consumer health informatics Consumer Health Informatics is an interactive text; filled with case studies and discussion questions With international authorship and edited by five leaders in the field, Consumer Health Informatics has tapped some of the best resources in informatics today

Contemporary Consumer Health Informatics

Author : Nilmini Wickramasinghe
File Size : 88.45 MB
Format : PDF, Kindle
Download : 511
Read : 1078
Download »
This innovative reference examines how consumer health informatics (CHI) can transform healthcare systems stressed by staffing shortages and budget constraints and challenged by patients taking a more active role in their care. It situates CHI as vital to upgrading healthcare service delivery, detailing the relationship between health information technologies and quality healthcare, and outlining what stakeholders need to learn for health IT systems to function effectively. Wide-ranging content identifies critical issues and answers key questions at the consumer, practitioner, administration, and staff levels, using examples from diverse conditions, countries, technologies, and specialties. In this framework, the benefits of CHI are seen across service domains, from individual patients and consumers to healthcare systems and global health entities. Included in the coverage: Use of video technology in an aged care environment A context-aware remote health monitoring service for improved patient care Accessibility issues in interoperable sharing of electronic health records: physician’s perspective Managing gestational diabetes with mobile web-based reporting of glucose readings An organizing vision perspective for developing and adopting e-health solutions An ontology of consumer health informatics Contemporary Consumer Health Informatics combines blueprint and idea book for public health and health informatics students, healthcare professionals, physicians, medical administrators, managers, and IT practitioners.

Consumer Informatics and Digital Health

Author : Margo Edmunds
File Size : 40.35 MB
Format : PDF, Docs
Download : 242
Read : 867
Download »
This unique collection synthesizes insights and evidence from innovators in consumer informatics and highlights the technical, behavioral, social, and policy issues driving digital health today and in the foreseeable future. Consumer Informatics and Digital Health presents the fundamentals of mobile health, reviews the evidence for consumer technology as a driver of health behavior change, and examines user experience and real-world technology design challenges and successes. Additionally, it identifies key considerations for successfully engaging consumers in their own care, considers the ethics of using personal health information in research, and outlines implications for health system redesign. The editors’ integrative systems approach heralds a future of technological advances tempered by best practices drawn from today’s critical policy goals of patient engagement, community health promotion, and health equity. Here’s the inside view of consumer health informatics and key digital fields that students and professionals will find inspiring, informative, and thought-provoking. Included among the topics: • Healthcare social media for consumer informatics • Understanding usability, accessibility, and human-centered design principles • Understanding the fundamentals of design for motivation and behavior change • Digital tools for parents: innovations in pediatric urgent care • Behavioral medicine and informatics in the cancer community • Content strategy: writing for health consumers on the web • Open science and the future of data analytics • Digital approaches to engage consumers in value-based purchasing Consumer Informatics and Digital Health takes an expansive view of the fields influencing consumer informatics and offers practical case-based guidance for a broad range of audiences, including students, educators, researchers, journalists, and policymakers interested in biomedical informatics, mobile health, information science, and population health. It has as much to offer readers in clinical fields such as medicine, nursing, and psychology as it does to those engaged in digital pursuits.

Consumer Health Informatics

Author : United States Accounting Office (GAO)
File Size : 74.76 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Docs
Download : 757
Read : 321
Download »
Consumer Health Informatics: Emerging Issues

Consumer Health Informatics A Complete Guide 2020 Edition

Author : Gerardus Blokdyk
File Size : 57.95 MB
Format : PDF, Docs
Download : 538
Read : 802
Download »
How do you define the solutions' scope? How do you think the partners involved in Consumer health informatics would have defined success? Do you have a flow diagram of what happens? How and when will the baselines be defined? Is the solution cost-effective? Defining, designing, creating, and implementing a process to solve a challenge or meet an objective is the most valuable role... In EVERY group, company, organization and department. Unless you are talking a one-time, single-use project, there should be a process. Whether that process is managed and implemented by humans, AI, or a combination of the two, it needs to be designed by someone with a complex enough perspective to ask the right questions. Someone capable of asking the right questions and step back and say, 'What are we really trying to accomplish here? And is there a different way to look at it?' This Self-Assessment empowers people to do just that - whether their title is entrepreneur, manager, consultant, (Vice-)President, CxO etc... - they are the people who rule the future. They are the person who asks the right questions to make Consumer Health Informatics investments work better. This Consumer Health Informatics All-Inclusive Self-Assessment enables You to be that person. All the tools you need to an in-depth Consumer Health Informatics Self-Assessment. Featuring 948 new and updated case-based questions, organized into seven core areas of process design, this Self-Assessment will help you identify areas in which Consumer Health Informatics improvements can be made. In using the questions you will be better able to: - diagnose Consumer Health Informatics projects, initiatives, organizations, businesses and processes using accepted diagnostic standards and practices - implement evidence-based best practice strategies aligned with overall goals - integrate recent advances in Consumer Health Informatics and process design strategies into practice according to best practice guidelines Using a Self-Assessment tool known as the Consumer Health Informatics Scorecard, you will develop a clear picture of which Consumer Health Informatics areas need attention. Your purchase includes access details to the Consumer Health Informatics self-assessment dashboard download which gives you your dynamically prioritized projects-ready tool and shows your organization exactly what to do next. You will receive the following contents with New and Updated specific criteria: - The latest quick edition of the book in PDF - The latest complete edition of the book in PDF, which criteria correspond to the criteria in... - The Self-Assessment Excel Dashboard - Example pre-filled Self-Assessment Excel Dashboard to get familiar with results generation - In-depth and specific Consumer Health Informatics Checklists - Project management checklists and templates to assist with implementation INCLUDES LIFETIME SELF ASSESSMENT UPDATES Every self assessment comes with Lifetime Updates and Lifetime Free Updated Books. Lifetime Updates is an industry-first feature which allows you to receive verified self assessment updates, ensuring you always have the most accurate information at your fingertips.

Impact of Consumer Health Informatics Applications

Author : U. S. Department of Health and Human Services
File Size : 72.81 MB
Format : PDF, Mobi
Download : 835
Read : 506
Download »
Interest is emerging concerning the potential of technology and eHealth solutions that are tailored to consumers. This emerging field has been referred to as consumer health informatics (CHI). It has been defined by Eysenbach as a branch of medical informatics that “analyzes consumers' needs for information, studies and implements methods of making information accessible to consumers, and models and integrates consumers' preferences into medical information systems.” For the purpose of this review, we define CHI applications as any electronic tool, technology, or system that is: 1) primarily designed to interact with health information users or consumers and 2) interacts directly with the consumer who provides personal health information to the CHI system and receives personalized health information from the tool application or system; and 3) is one in which the data, information, recommendations or other benefits provided to the consumer, may be used with a healthcare professional, but is not dependent on a healthcare professional. As such, for the purposes of this review, we have excluded point of care devices (e.g., glucometer, remote monitoring devices), prescribed clinical devices that are part of the provision of clinical care, general information websites, message boards, and applications that are designed for use in a work environment. This definition has the following advantages: 1) It keeps the focus of the review on how CHI applications meet the needs of consumers rather than the needs of clinicians; 2) It helps avoid a categorical disease-oriented evaluation of every clinical technological development for every disease which is not necessarily focused on the needs of consumers; 3) It helps to keep the focus of the review on studies that demonstrate impact, value or efficacy from the perspective of consumers; 4) It facilitates categorization of CHI applications in ways that may be more meaningful for patients. Potential categories of CHI tools/technologies/applications include but may not be limited to: a. Applications and technologies that facilitate knowing/tracking/understanding clinical parameters (disease management); b. Applications and technologies that facilitate knowing/tracking/understanding observations of daily living (ODL's); c. Applications and technologies that facilitate calendaring (lifestyle management assistance); d. Applications and technologies that facilitate prevention and health promotion; e. Applications and technologies that facilitate self-care; and f. Applications and technologies that facilitate assisted care and caregiving. The objective of the report is to review the literature on the evidence of the impact of currently developed CHI applications on health and health care process outcomes, to identify the gaps in the literature, and to recommend future research endeavors to better assess these information technology (IT) applications. The specific Key Questions were: 1. What evidence exists that CHI applications impact: a. Health care process outcomes (e.g., receiving appropriate treatment) among users? b. Intermediate health outcomes (e.g., self management, health knowledge, and health behaviors) among users? c. Relationship-centered outcomes (e.g., shared decision making or clinician-patient communication) among users? d. Clinical outcomes (including quality of life) among users? e. Economic outcomes (e.g., cost and access to care) among users? 2. What are the barriers that clinicians, developers and consumers and their families or caregivers encounter that limit utilization or implementation of CHI applications? 3. What knowledge or evidence exists to support estimates of cost, benefit, and net value with regard to CHI applications? 4. What critical information regarding the impact of CHI applications is needed in order to give consumers, their families, clinicians, and developers a clear understanding of the value proposition particular to them?

Impact of Consumer Health Informatics Applications

Author :
File Size : 37.86 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Download : 647
Read : 864
Download »
Many people are excited about the potential to improve the health of the public by using health information technology (health IT) and eHealth solutions that are tailored to consumers. Despite growing interest in this field referred to as consumer health informatics (CHI), the value of CHI applications has not been rigorously reviewed. The objectives of this report were to review the literature on the evidence of the influence of currently developed CHI applications on health and health care process outcomes, to identify the gaps in the CHI literature, and to make recommendations for future CHI research. For the purposes of this review, CHI is defined as any electronic tool, technology, or electronic application that is designed to interact directly with consumers, with or without the presence of a health care professional that provides or uses individualized (personal) information and provides the consumer with individualized assistance, to help the patient better manage their health or health care.

Consumer Health Informatics

Author : United States. General Accounting Office
File Size : 41.72 MB
Format : PDF, Docs
Download : 418
Read : 1058
Download »
This report presents the results of a United States General Accounting Office review of consumer health informatics. It also presents a survey of consumer health informatics experts' views on the topic's issues.