Search Results for "dionysus-myth-and-cult"

Dionysus

Dionysus

Myth and Cult

  • Author: Walter Friedrich Otto
  • Publisher: Indiana University Press
  • ISBN: 9780253208910
  • Category: History
  • Page: 243
  • View: 8988
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"This study of Dionysus... is also a new theogony of Early Greece." —Publishers Weekly "An original analysis... of the spiritual significance of the Greek myth and cult of Dionysus." —Theology Digest

Insanity and Genius

Insanity and Genius

Masks of Madness and the Mapping of Meaning and Value (Second Edition)

  • Author: Harry Eiss
  • Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing
  • ISBN: 1443860867
  • Category: Philosophy
  • Page: 770
  • View: 9436
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In his book about the discovery of the structure of DNA, James Watson wrote, “So we had lunch, telling ourselves that a structure this beautiful just had to exist.” Indeed, the quest most often asked by scientists about a scientific theory is “Is it beautiful?” Yes, beauty equals truth. Scientists know, mathematicians know. But the beauties, the truths of mathematics and science were not the truths that inspired the author as a child, and he intuitively knew that the truths he needed come from a different way of knowing, a way of knowing not of the world of logic and reason and explanation (though they have a value), but rather a way of knowing that is of the world expression, a world that enters the truths beyond the grasp of logic. That is what this book is all about. It is an exploration of the greatest minds of human existence struggling to understand the deepest truths of the human condition. This second edition updates the previous one, incorporating new publications on Van Gogh, recent discoveries in neurology, psychology, and the rapid developments in understanding DNA and biotechnology. We’ve come a long way already from that original discovery by Watson and his coauthor Francis Crick.

The Fairy Feller’s Master-Stroke

The Fairy Feller’s Master-Stroke

  • Author: Harry Eiss
  • Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing
  • ISBN: 1443844888
  • Category: History
  • Page: 250
  • View: 2974
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Richard Dadd is a trickster, a pre-post-modern enigma wrapped in a Shakespearean Midsummer Night’s Dream; an Elizabethan Puck living in a smothering Victorian insane asylum, foreshadowing and, in brilliant, Mad Hatter conundrums, entering the fragmented shards of today’s nightmarish oxymorons long before the artists currently trying to give them the joker’s ephemeral maps of discourse. The author thinks of Bob Dylan’s “Ballad of a Thin Man,” that cryptic refusal to reduce the warped mirrors of reality to prosaic lies, or, perhaps “All Along the Watchtower” or “Mr Tambourine Man.” Even more than Samuel Beckett’s Waiting for Godot, which curiously enough comes off as overly esoteric, too studied, too conscious, Dadd’s entire existence foreshadows the forbidden entrance into the numinous, the realization of the inexplicable labyrinths of contemporary existence, that wonderfully rich Marcel Duchamp landscape of puns and satiric paradigms, that surrealistic parallax of the brilliant gamester Salvador Dali, that smirking irony of the works of Roy Lichtenstein, Robert Rauschenberg, John Cage, and Robert Indiana; that fragmented, meta-fictional struggle of Kurt Vonnegut’s Slaughterhouse Five. John Lennon certainly sensed it and couldn’t help but push into meta-real worlds in his own lyrics. Think of “Strawberry Fields Forever,” “I Am the Walrus,” and the more self-conscious “Revolution Number 9.” In “Yer Blues,” he even refers to Dylan’s main character, Mr Jones from “Ballad of a Thin Man.” If Lennon’s song is taken seriously, literally, then it is a dark crying out by a suicidal man, “Lord, I’m lonely, wanna die”; or, if taken as a metaphor for a lover’s lost feelings about his unfulfilled love, it falls into the romantic rant of a typical blues or teenage rock-and-roll song. However, even on this level, it has an irony about it, a sense of laughing at itself and at Dylan’s Mr Jones, who knows something is going on but just not what it is, and then, by extension, all of us who have awakened to the fact that the studied Western world doesn’t make sense, all of us who struggle to find meaning in the nonsense images, characters, and happenings in the song, and perhaps, coming to a conclusion that the nonsense is the sense.

Myths of Freedom

Myths of Freedom

Equality, Modern Thought, and Philosophical Radicalism

  • Author: Stephen L. Gardner
  • Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group
  • ISBN: 9780313307249
  • Category: Philosophy
  • Page: 197
  • View: 5086
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The driving force behind modern thought is the new potential for equality, which intensifies the violence and volatility in human relations, catalyzing the modern world. This is reflected, but not always made transparent, Stephen Gardner asserts, in the myths of freedom that govern modern culture and the basic framework of modern thought. The original intent of freedom for early modern thinkers was to establish a principle of order or rank to stabilize the volatility of equality. But, backfiring, in later modern thought, freedom supplies a justificatory myth for "master-slave" relations arising within equality.

Dionysus

Dionysus

  • Author: Russell Roberts
  • Publisher: Mitchell Lane Publishers, Inc.
  • ISBN: 1612284132
  • Category: Juvenile Nonfiction
  • Page: 48
  • View: 2737
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Dionysus, the Greek god of wine, was a figure of many different personalities. Was he the mellow, smiling youth who gaily spread his gift of wine all over the world . . . or was he the fierce warrior who subjugated entire nations to his unbending will? Even his gift of wine reflected his dual nature. Wine could make people feel happy and good about themselves. Yet it could also turn them into mindless beasts who acted without thought or reason. The only god with a mortal mother, hated by Hera and driven mad by her, Dionysus figures in some of the most well-known tales of all time, such as the story of King Midas. His influence is vast and his importance to modern cultures remains strong, even while some of the other Olympians have faded into the pages of history. Dionysus has survived for thousands of years. He will likely survive for thousands of years to come.

Dionysiac Poetics and Euripides' Bacchae

Dionysiac Poetics and Euripides' Bacchae

  • Author: Charles Segal
  • Publisher: Princeton University Press
  • ISBN: 9780691015972
  • Category: Literary Criticism
  • Page: 420
  • View: 2023
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Includes afterword (p. 349-393) by the author: Dionysus and the Bacchae in the light of recent scholarship.

The Oxford Companion to Classical Civilization

The Oxford Companion to Classical Civilization

  • Author: Simon Hornblower,Antony Spawforth,Esther Eidinow
  • Publisher: OUP Oxford
  • ISBN: 0191016764
  • Category: History
  • Page: 912
  • View: 7463
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What did the ancient Greeks eat and drink? What role did migration play? Why was emperor Nero popular with the ordinary people but less so with the upper classes? Why (according to ancient authors) was Oedipus ('with swollen foot') so called? For over 2,000 years the civilizations of ancient Greece and Rome have captivated our collective imagination and provided inspiration for so many aspects of our lives, from culture, literature, drama, cinema, and television to society, education, and politics. Many of the roots of the way life is lived in the West today can be traced to the ancient civilizations, not only in politics, law, technology, philosophy, and science, but also in social and family life, language, and art. Beautiful illustrations, clear and authoritative entries, and a useful chronology and bibliography make this Companion the perfect guide for readers interested in learning more about the Graeco-Roman world. As well as providing sound information on all aspects of classical civilization such as history, politics, ethics, morals, law, society, religion, mythology, science and technology, language, literature, art, and scholarship, the entries in the Companion reflect the changing interdisciplinary aspects of classical studies, covering broad thematic subjects, such as race, nationalism, gender, ethics, and ecology, confirming the impact classical civilizations have had on the modern world.

Dionysus Resurrected

Dionysus Resurrected

Performances of Euripides' The Bacchae in a Globalizing World

  • Author: Erika Fischer-Lichte
  • Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
  • ISBN: 1118609751
  • Category: Literary Criticism
  • Page: 264
  • View: 6321
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Dionysus Resurrected analyzes the global resurgence sincethe late 1960s of Euripides’ The Bacchae. By analyzingand contextualizing these modern day performances, the authorreveals striking parallels between transformational events takingplace during the era of the play’s revival and events withinthe play itself. Puts forward a lively discussion of the parallels betweentransformational eventsduring the era of the play’s revivaland events within the play itself The first comparative study to analyse and contextualizeperformances of The Bacchae that took place between 1968 and2009 from the United States, Africa, Latin America, Europe andAsia Argues that presentations of the play not only representliminal states but also transfer the spectators into suchstates Contends that the play’s reflection on various stages ofglobalization render the tragedy a contemporary play Establishes the importance of The Bacchae withinEuripides’ work as the only extant tragedy in which the godDionysus himself appears, not just as a character but as theprotagonist

Dancing in the Streets

Dancing in the Streets

A History of Collective Joy

  • Author: Barbara Ehrenreich
  • Publisher: Metropolitan Books
  • ISBN: 9781429904650
  • Category: History
  • Page: 336
  • View: 458
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From the bestselling social commentator and cultural historian, a fascinating exploration of one of humanity's oldest traditions: the celebration of communal joy In the acclaimed Blood Rites, Barbara Ehrenreich delved into the origins of our species' attraction to war. Here, she explores the opposite impulse, one that has been so effectively suppressed that we lack even a term for it: the desire for collective joy, historically expressed in ecstatic revels of feasting, costuming, and dancing. Ehrenreich uncovers the origins of communal celebration in human biology and culture. Although sixteenth-century Europeans viewed mass festivities as foreign and "savage," Ehrenreich shows that they were indigenous to the West, from the ancient Greeks' worship of Dionysus to the medieval practice of Christianity as a "danced religion." Ultimately, church officials drove the festivities into the streets, the prelude to widespread reformation: Protestants criminalized carnival, Wahhabist Muslims battled ecstatic Sufism, European colonizers wiped out native dance rites. The elites' fear that such gatherings would undermine social hierarchies was justified: the festive tradition inspired French revolutionary crowds and uprisings from the Caribbean to the American plains. Yet outbreaks of group revelry persist, as Ehrenreich shows, pointing to the 1960s rock-and-roll rebellion and the more recent "carnivalization" of sports. Original, exhilarating, and deeply optimistic, Dancing in the Streets concludes that we are innately social beings, impelled to share our joy and therefore able to envision, even create, a more peaceable future.

Dare to Struggle

Dare to Struggle

The History and Society of Greece

  • Author: Richard M. Berthold
  • Publisher: iUniverse
  • ISBN: 1440163952
  • Category: History
  • Page: 268
  • View: 6604
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WHY SHOULD YOU READ A GREEK HISTORY? Because you simply cannot consider yourself an educated person unless you know something about the society of ancient Greece. Because the Greeks discovered the foundation elements of Western society: constitutionalism, rationalism, humanism and the individual. Because Greek history is in effect our own history. Because the Greeks were seriously cool. WHY SHOULD YOU READ THISGREEK HISTORY? Because it answers the important questions that others do not. Because it relates Greek history to contemporary society. Because it covers ALL the topics. Because it is NOT boring or politically correct.