Search results for: empire-ranch-images-of-america

Empire Ranch

Author : Gail Waechter Corkill
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The Empire Ranch sits in the heart of the rolling grasslands and oak-studded foothills of Las Cienegas National Conservation Area in southeastern Arizona. Its remarkable history and the ranching way of life are told through the stories of the men, women, and children of the Empire, most notably the Vail, Boice, and Donaldson families. Walter L. Vail and Herbert R. Hislop purchased the Empire Ranch homestead for $2,000 in 1876. The Vail family operated the ranch until 1928, turning it into a cattle ranching empire. From 1928 to 1975, the well-respected Boice family ran a vibrant Hereford operation on the Empire. The Donaldson family used innovative range management methods to continue the ranching legacy from 1975 to 2009. Today, the ranch, under the management of the Bureau of Land Management, remains one of the oldest continuously working cattle ranches in the region.

Around Sonoita

Author : Betty Barr
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Located at the foot of the majestic Santa Rita Mountains in southeastern Arizona, Sonoita is known for its rolling grasslands, grazing cattle, and working cowboys in well-worn jeans. Ranching blossomed in the early 1880s when the Southern Pacific Railroad linked Benson to Nogales, allowing local cattlemen to ship their livestock to market by train. It would be another 30 years before the first Sonoita Post Office was established, with postmistress Clara Hummel dispensing the mail from her home. The area would remain unincorporated--the closest pioneer neighbors were miles away over dirt roads--but the citizenry grew in friendship and cooperation, developing a community spirit that still exists today. Locals and visitors alike enjoy Sonoita's neighboring communities of Patagonia, where a historic train depot evokes memories of the town's role as a distribution center for area mines and ranches, and Elgin, where old-time cattle ranches now share fence lines with the lush vineyards of Winery Row.

Wild West Shows and the Images of American Indians 1883 1933

Author : L. G. Moses
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Between the 1880s and the 1930s Show Indians depicted their warfare with whites and portrayed scenes from their culture in productions that traveled throughout the United States and Europe and drew huge audiences--well over a million people in 1885 alone. The view that they were tipi-and-war-bonnet Indians exploited by entrepreneurs like Buffalo Bill was commonly held by reformers of the 1890s, and has been uncritically accepted ever since. This book, now available in paperback, is the first to examine the lives and experiences of Show Indians from their own point of view. Their dances, re-enactments of battles, and village encampments, the author demonstrates, helped preserve the Indians' cultural heritage through decades of forced assimilation. This book also looks at Wild West shows as ventures in the entertainment business. By considering financing, scripting, recruitment, logistics, and public and creditor perceptions, L. G. Moses reveals the complexity of the enterprise and the numerous--and often contradictory--meanings the shows had for Indians, entrepreneurs, audiences, and government officials.

Vail and Colossal Cave Mountain Park

Author : Sharon E. Hunt
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Just 22 miles southeast of Tucson in the Sonoran Desert sits the town of Vail, colloquially known as "The Town between the Tracks," which refers to the two train tracks running through its tiny business center. The area is named for Walter L. Vail, who, with his partners, formed the sprawling Empire Ranch in 1876. Vail is also the home of Colossal Cave, a "dry cave" where visitors can view stunning formations and hear stories of Native Americans, bandits, and moviemakers. The cave served as the site of a Civilian Conservation Corps camp in the mid-1930s, when workers installed trails and lighting in the cave, constructed administration buildings, and built roads and picnic spots in the surrounding area. Colossal Cave is now united with the La Posta Quemada Ranch, a working cattle ranch since the 1870s, to form the 2,400-acre Colossal Cave Mountain Park.

Smartsville and Timbuctoo

Author : Kathleen Smith
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Smartsville and Timbuctoo (California State Landmarks Nos. 321 and 320) are essentially one place with two names. As worked-out claims and floods forced placer forty-niners up from the sandbars into the hills above the Yuba River, and as word spread around the world about gold in the California hills, towns and communities formed. The Smartsville and Timbuctoo area was once the most populated place in eastern Yuba County. Black Bart, Jim "the Timbuctoo Terror" Webster, and other desperadoes haunted the local roads. Eventually fires, worked-out diggings, and the Sawyer Decision succeeded in driving out all but the most dedicated (and in some cases eccentric) residents. Neither town, though, is ready yet for the dustbin of history: the population might once again explode-this time not with gold seekers but with long-distance commuters, turning the former boomtowns into future bedroom communities.

Circle Z Guest Ranch

Author : Gail Waechter Corkill
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Nestled in Sonoita Valley along the banks of Sonoita Creek, just 15 miles north of Mexico, Circle Z Guest Ranch welcomes vacationers to experience a taste of the Old West, with the comfortable pleasures of a traditional family-style ranch but without the risks. Horseback riding, relaxation, and cowboy cookouts have been the ranch's main attractions for the past 90 years, earning Circle Z the distinction of being the oldest continuously operating guest ranch in Arizona. It evolved from a four-room adobe homestead to a working cattle ranch before becoming a highly profitable sheepherding operation. In 1924, brothers Carl and Lee Zinsmeister arrived in Patagonia with a vision of developing a dude ranch with a resort feel. They purchased 5,000 acres of the San José de Sonoita land grant, which included the Sanford estate. Circle Z opened in 1926 and quickly became one of the finest guest ranches in the state. Today, the Nash family operates this memorable ranch famous for its well-trained horses and miles of scenic trails.

Empire s Nature

Author : Amy R. W. Meyers
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Completed in 1747, Mark Catesby's Natural History of Carolina, Florida, and the Bahama Islands was the first major illustrated publication on the flora and fauna of Britain's American colonies. Together with his Hortus Britanno-Americanus (1763), which detailed plant species that might be transplanted successfully to British soil, Catesby's Natural History exerted an important, though often overlooked, influence on the development of art, natural history, and scientific observation in the eighteenth century. Inspired by a major traveling exhibition of Catesby's watercolor drawings from the Royal Library, Windsor Castle, this collection of interdisciplinary essays considers Catesby's endeavors as a naturalist-artist, scientific explorer, experimental horticulturist, ornamental gardener, and early environmental thinker in terms of the interests held by the various, overlapping communities in which he functioned_particularly as those interests related to the British colonial enterprise. The contributors are David R. Brigham, Joyce E. Chaplin, Mark Laird, Amy R. W. Meyers, Therese O'Malley, and Margaret Beck Pritchard. The contributors: David R. Brigham (Worcester Art Museum) Joyce E. Chaplin (Vanderbilt University) Mark Laird (University of Toronto) Amy R. W. Meyers (Huntington Library & Art Collections) Therese O'Malley (National Gallery of Art) Margaret Beck Pritchard (Colonial Williamsburg Foundation)

The Landscapes of Western Movies

Author : Jeremy Agnew
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Western films have often been tributes to place and setting, with the magnificent backdrops mirroring the wildness of the narratives. As the splendid outdoor scenery of Westerns could not be found on a studio back lot or on a Hollywood sound stage, the movies have been filmed in the wide open spaces of the American West and beyond. This book chronicles the history of filming Westerns on location, from shooting on the East Coast in the early 1900s; through the use of locations in Utah, Arizona, and California in the 1940s and 1950s; and filming Westerns in Mexico, Spain, and other parts of the world in the 1960s. Also studied is the relationship between the filming location timeline and the evolving motion picture industry of the twentieth century, and how these factors shaped audience perceptions of the "Real West."

Kings County

Author : Robin Michael Roberts
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Kings County, sprawling across the San Joaquin Valley south of the Kings River and encompassing the bulk of the historic Tulare Lake bed, is an agricultural wonder with ranches, dairy farms, vineyards, and multiple other field and orchard crops. Created in 1893 from Tulare County and expanded in 1909 from elements of Fresno County, Kings County has grown in the last century from a forgotten corner of California into a major agricultural-economic force.

Sea of Sand

Author : Michael M. Geary
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Sculpted into graceful contours by countless centuries of wind and water, the Great Sand Dunes sprawl along the eastern fringes of the vast San Luis Valley of south-central Colorado. Covering an area of nearly thirty square miles, they are the tallest aeolian, or wind-produced, dunes in North America, towering 750 feet above the valley floor. With the addition of the enormous Baca Ranch and other adjacent lands, the dunes—originally designated as a National Monument in 1932—attained official National Park status in 2004. In Sea of Sand, Michael M. Geary guides readers on a historical journey through this unique ecosystem, which includes an array of natural and cultural wonders, from the main dunefield and verdant wetlands to the summits of the Sangre de Cristo Mountains. Described by explorer Zebulon Pike as “a sea in a storm” and by frontier photographer William Henry Jackson as “a curious and very singular phase of nature’s freak,” the Great Sand Dunes are a nexus of more than 10,000 years of human history, from Paleolithic big-game hunters to nomadic Native Americans, from Spanish conquistadores and transcontinental explorers to hard-rock miners and modern-day tourists in motor homes. Like these successive waves of visitors, Sea of Sand follows the water, analyzing its critical role in the settlement and development of the region. Geary also describes the profound impact that waves of human use and settlement have had on the land—which ultimately inspired the early grassroots efforts by San Luis Valley citizens to protect the dunes from further exploitation. He examines as well the more recent legislative effort led by an unprecedented coalition of local, state, and federal agencies and organizations, including The Nature Conservancy and the National Park Service, to secure the Great Sand Dunes’ national park designation. Amply illustrated, Sea of Sand is the definitive history of the natural, cultural, and political forces that helped shape this incomparable landscape.