Search results for: english-reformations

English Reformations

Author : Christopher Haigh
File Size : 78.32 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Docs
Download : 749
Read : 240
Download »
English Reformations takes a refreshing new approach to the study of the Reformation in England. Christopher Haigh's lively and readable study disproves any facile assumption that the triumph of Protestantism was inevitable, and goes beyond the surface of official political policy to explore the religious views and practices of ordinary English people. With the benefit of hindsight, other historians have traced the course of the Reformation as a series of events inescapably culminating in the creation of the English Protestant establishment. Haigh sets out to recreate the sixteenth century as a time of excitement and insecurity, with each new policy or ruler causing the reversal of earlier religious changes. This is a scholarly and stimulating book, which challenges traditional ideas about the Reformation and offers a powerful and convincing alternative analysis.

Italian Reform and English Reformations c 1535 c 1585

Author : M. Anne Overell
File Size : 50.10 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Docs
Download : 877
Read : 931
Download »
This is the first full-scale study of interactions between Italy's religious reform and English reformations, which were notoriously liable to pick up other people's ideas. The book is of fundamental importance for those whose work includes revisionist themes of ambiguity, opportunism and interdependence in sixteenth century religious change. Anne Overell adopts an inclusive approach, retaining within the group of Italian reformers those spirituali who left the church and those who remained within it, and exploring commitment to reform, whether 'humanist', 'protestant' or 'catholic'. In 1547, when the internationalist Archbishop Thomas Cranmer invited foreigners to foster a bolder reformation, the Italians Peter Martyr Vermigli and Bernardino Ochino were the first to arrive in England. The generosity with which they were received caused comment all over Europe: handsome travel expenses, prestigious jobs, congregations which included the great and the good. This was an entry con brio, but the book also casts new light on our understanding of Marian reformation, led by Cardinal Reginald Pole, English by birth but once prominent among Italy's spirituali. When Pole arrived to take his native country back to papal allegiance, he brought with him like-minded men and Italian reform continued to be woven into English history. As the tables turned again at the accession of Elizabeth I, there was further clamour to 'bring back Italians'. Yet Elizabethans had grown cautious and the book's later chapters analyse the reasons why, offering scholars a new perspective on tensions between national and international reformations. Exploring a nexus of contacts in England and in Italy, Anne Overell presents an intriguing connection, sealed by the sufferings of exile and always tempered by political constraints. Here, for the first time, Italian reform is shown as an enduring part of the Elect Nation's literature and myth.

Women during the English Reformations

Author : J. Chappell
File Size : 21.4 MB
Format : PDF, Kindle
Download : 453
Read : 1070
Download »
Catholic or Protestant, recusant or godly rebel, early modern women reinvented their spiritual and gendered spaces during the reformations in religion in England during the sixteenth century and beyond. These essays explore the ways in which some Englishwomen struggled to erase, rewrite, or reimagine their religious and gender identities.

Tudor Histories of the English Reformations 1530 83

Author : Thomas Betteridge
File Size : 66.47 MB
Format : PDF, Docs
Download : 638
Read : 607
Download »
This book examines the Tudor histories of the English Reformation written in the period 1530-83. All the reforming mid-Tudor regimes used historical discourses to support the religious changes they introduced. Indeed the English Reformation as a historical event was written, and rewritten, by Henrician, Edwardian, Marian and Elizabethan historians to provide legitimation for the religious policies of the government of the day. Starting with John Bale’s King Johan, this book examines these histories of the English Reformations. It addresses the issues behind Bale’s editions of the Examinations of Anne Askewe, discusses in detail the almost wholly neglected history writing of Mary Tudor’s reign and concludes with a discussion of John Foxe’s Acts and Monuments. In the process of working chronologically through the Reformation historiography of the period 1530-1583 this book explores the ideological conflicts that mid-Tudor historians of the English Reformations addressed and the differences, but also the similarities often cutting across doctrinal differences, that existed between their texts.

The English Reformation Revised

Author : ed HAIGH
File Size : 85.84 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Download : 923
Read : 493
Download »
Twenty years ago, historians thought they understood the Reformation in England. Professor A. G. Dickens's elegant The English Reformation was then new, and highly influential: it seemed to show how national policy and developing reformist allegiance interacted to produce an acceptable and successful Protestant Reformation. But, since then, the evidence of the statute book, of Protestant propagandists and of heresy trials has come to seem less convincing, Neglected documents, especially the records of diocesan administration and parish life, have been explored, new questions have been asked - and many of the answers have been surprising. Some of the old certainties have been demolished, and many of the assumptions of the old interpretation of the Reformation have been undermined, in a wide-ranging process of revision. But the fruits of the new 'revisionism' are still buried in technical academic journals, difficult for students and teachers to find and to use. There is no up-to-date textbook, no comprehensive new survey, to challenge the orthodoxies enshrined in older works. This volume seeks to fulfill two crucial needs for students of Tudor England. First, it brings together some of the most readable of the recent innovative essays and articles into a single book. Second, it seeks to show how a new 'revisionist' interpretation of the English Reformation can be constructed, and examines its strengths and weaknesses. In short, it is an alternative to a new textbook survey - until someone has time (and courage) to write one. The new Introduction sets out the framework for a new understanding of the Reformation, and shows how already published work can be fitted into it. The nine essays (one printed here for the first time) provide detailed studies of particular problems in Reformation history, and general surveys of the progress of religious change. The new Conclusion tries to plug some of the remaining gaps, and suggests how the Reformation came to divide the English nation. It is a deliberately controversial collection, to be used alongside existing textbooks and to promote rethinking and debate.

The English Reformation

Author : ALEC RYRIE
File Size : 27.58 MB
Format : PDF
Download : 324
Read : 1057
Download »
'Masterly' - Eric Metaxas 'Mould-breaking' - John Guy 'A little gem of a book' - Suzannah Lipscomb From the Introduction: ‘There is no such thing as “the English Reformation”. A "Reformation" is a composite event which is only made visible by being framed the right way. It is like a “war”: a label we put onto a particular set of events, while we decide that other – equally violent – acts are not part of that or of any "war". Sixteenth- and seventeenth-century English people knew that they were living through an age of religious upheaval, but they did not know that it was "the English Reformation", any more than the soldiers at the battle of Agincourt knew that they were fighting in “the Hundred Years’ War”. . . . ‘Plainly these religious upheavals permanently changed England and, by extension, the many other countries on which English culture has made its mark. There is not, however, a single master narrative of all this turmoil. How could there be? . . . The way you choose to tell the story is governed by what you think is important and what is trivial, by whether there are heroes or villains you want to celebrate or condemn, and by the legacies and lessons which you think matter. Once you have chosen your frame, it will give you the story you want. ‘So this book does not tell "the story" of “the English Reformation”. It tells the stories of six English Reformations, or rather six stories of religious change in sixteenth- and seventeenth-century England. The stories are parallel and overlapping, but each has a somewhat different chronological frame, cast of characters and set of pivotal events, and has left a different legacy.’

A Companion to English Renaissance Literature and Culture

Author : Michael Hattaway
File Size : 77.4 MB
Format : PDF
Download : 640
Read : 1109
Download »
This is a one volume, up-to-date collection of more than fifty wide-ranging essays which will inspire and guide students of the Renaissance and provide course leaders with a substantial and helpful frame of reference. Provides new perspectives on established texts. Orientates the new student, while providing advanced students with current and new directions. Pioneered by leading scholars. Occupies a unique niche in Renaissance studies. Illustrated with 12 single-page black and white prints.

The Beginnings of English Protestantism

Author : Professor of the History of Christianity Alec Ryrie
File Size : 70.89 MB
Format : PDF, Kindle
Download : 290
Read : 576
Download »
Table of contents

Royal Priesthood in the English Reformation

Author : Malcolm B. Yarnell III
File Size : 37.46 MB
Format : PDF, Kindle
Download : 934
Read : 697
Download »
Royal Priesthood in the English Reformation assesses the understandings of the Christian doctrine of royal priesthood, long considered one of the three major Reformation teachings, as held by an array of royal, clerical, and popular theologians during the English Reformation. Historians and theologians often present the doctrine according to more recent debates rather than the contextual understandings manifested by the historical figures under consideration. Beginning with a radical reevaluation of John Wyclif and an incisive survey of late medieval accounts, the book challenges the predominant presentation of the doctrine of royal priesthood as primarily individualistic and anticlerical, in the process clarifying these other concepts. It also demonstrates that the late medieval period located more religious authority within the monarchy than is typically appreciated. After the revolutionary use of the doctrine by Martin Luther in early modern Germany, it was wielded variously between and within diverse English royal, clerical, and lay factions under Henry VIII and Edward VI, yet the Old and New Testament passages behind the doctrine were definitely construed in a monarchical direction. With Thomas Cranmer, the English evangelical presentation of the universal priesthood largely received its enduring official shape, but challenges came from within the English magisterium as well as from both radical and conservative religious thinkers. Under the sacred Tudor queens, who subtly and successfully maintained their own sacred authority, the various doctrinal positions hardened into a range of early modern forms with surprising permutations.

Philip Melanchthon and the English Reformation

Author : John Schofield
File Size : 35.90 MB
Format : PDF, Kindle
Download : 920
Read : 1330
Download »
Following his break with Rome, Henry VIII flirted with Lutheranism as a doctrine to replace Catholicism, before the eventual collapse of the policy and its replacement with a more moderate reform programme under Cranmer. Melanchthon, as the leading proponent of Lutheranism influenced successive royal governments, both positively and negatively. By refracting the well known narrative of the English Reformation through the lens of Melanchthon, new light is shed on such questions as why Henry suddenly abandoned his Lutheran policy, why Cromwell fell from power in 1540 and even insights into Elizabeth's personal beliefs.

The Oxford Illustrated History of the Reformation

Author : Peter Marshall
File Size : 24.33 MB
Format : PDF, Mobi
Download : 881
Read : 1287
Download »
The Reformation was a seismic event in history, whose consequences are still working themselves out in Europe and across the world. The protests against the marketing of indulgences staged by the German monk Martin Luther in 1517 belonged to a long-standing pattern of calls for internal reform and renewal in the Christian Church. But they rapidly took a radical and unexpected turn, engulfing first Germany and then Europe as a whole in furious arguments about how God's will was to be 'saved'. However, these debates did not remain confined to a narrow sphere of theology. They came to reshape politics and international relations; social, cultural, and artistic developments; relations between the sexes; and the patterns and performances of everyday life. They were also the stimulus for Christianity's transformation into a truly global religion, as agents of the Roman Catholic Church sought to compensate for losses in Europe with new conversions in Asia and the Americas. Covering both Protestant and Catholic reform movements, in Europe and across the wider world, this beautifully illustrated volume tells the story of the Reformation from its immediate, explosive beginnings, through to its profound longer-term consequences and legacy for the modern world. The story is not one of an inevitable triumph of liberty over oppression, enlightenment over ignorance. Rather, it tells how a multitude of rival groups and individuals, with or without the support of political power, strove after visions of 'reform'. And how, in spite of themselves, they laid the foundations for the plural and conflicted world we now inhabit.

Reformations of the Body

Author : J. Waldron
File Size : 45.61 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Download : 409
Read : 840
Download »
This project takes the human body and the bodily senses as joints that articulate new kinds of connections between church and theatre and overturns a longstanding notion about theatrical phenomenology in this period.

British Consciousness and Identity

Author : Brendan Bradshaw
File Size : 70.55 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Download : 855
Read : 773
Download »
Essays on the early modern period that make a special contribution to the development of the 'new British history'.

Contesting the Reformation

Author : C. Scott Dixon
File Size : 77.51 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Docs
Download : 315
Read : 1157
Download »
Contesting the Reformation provides a comprehensive survey of the most influential works in the field of Reformation studies from a comparative, cross-national, interdisciplinary perspective. Represents the only English-language single-authored synthetic study of Reformation historiography Addresses both the English and the Continental debates on Reformation history Provides a thematic approach which takes in the main trends in modern Reformation history Draws on the most recent publications relating to Reformation studies Considers the social, political, cultural, and intellectual implications of the Reformation and the associated literature

The Parish in English Life 1400 1600

Author : Katherine L. French
File Size : 74.94 MB
Format : PDF, Docs
Download : 650
Read : 1054
Download »
The first comprehensive survey of the religious, social and cultural life of late medieval and Reformation parishes covers town and country, northern as well as southern communities, and provides an indication of the European setting just before and just after the enormous social and religious changes of the 16th century. 15 illustrations.

Reformation Studies

Author : A. G. Dickens
File Size : 32.45 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Docs
Download : 747
Read : 174
Download »

Popular Politics and the English Reformation

Author : Ethan H. Shagan
File Size : 88.15 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Docs
Download : 851
Read : 543
Download »
Table of contents

Reformation Unbound

Author : Karl Gunther
File Size : 51.86 MB
Format : PDF
Download : 840
Read : 842
Download »
Fundamentally revising our understanding of the nature and intellectual contours of early English Protestantism, Karl Gunther argues that sixteenth-century English evangelicals were calling for reforms and envisioning godly life in ways that were far more radical than have hitherto been appreciated. Typically such ideas have been seen as later historical developments, associated especially with radical Puritanism, but Gunther's work draws attention to their development in the earliest decades of the English Reformation. Along the way, the book offers new interpretations of central episodes in this period of England's history, such as the 'Troubles at Frankfurt' under Mary and the Elizabethan vestments controversy. By shedding new light on early English Protestantism, the book ultimately casts the later development of Puritanism in a new light, enabling us to re-situate it in a history of radical Protestant thought that reaches back to the beginnings of the English Reformation itself.

Memory and the English Reformation

Author : Brian Cummings
File Size : 80.62 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Docs
Download : 314
Read : 160
Download »
The dramatic religious revolutions of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries involved a battle over social memory. On one side, the Reformation repudiated key aspects of medieval commemorative culture; on the other, traditional religion claimed that Protestantism was a religion without memory. This volume shows how religious memory was sometimes attacked and extinguished, while at other times rehabilitated in a modified guise. It investigates how new modes of memorialisation were embodied in texts, material objects, images, physical buildings, rituals, and bodily gestures. Attentive to the roles played by denial, amnesia, and fabrication, it also considers the retrospective processes by which the English Reformation became identified as an historic event. Examining dissident as well as official versions of this story, this richly illustrated, interdisciplinary collection traces how memory of the religious revolution evolved in the two centuries following the Henrician schism, and how the Reformation embedded itself in the early modern cultural imagination.

Redefining Benefit of Clergy During the English Reformation

Author : Lesley Skousen
File Size : 59.85 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Docs
Download : 876
Read : 216
Download »