Search results for: human-spatial-cognition-and-experience

Human Spatial Cognition and Experience

Author : Toru Ishikawa
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This book offers students an introduction to human spatial cognition and experience and is designed for graduate and advanced undergraduate students who are interested in the study of maps in the head and the psychology of space. We live in space and space surrounds us. We interact with space all the time, consciously or unconsciously, and make decisions and actions based on our perceptions of that space. Have you ever wondered how some people navigate perfectly using maps in their heads while other people get lost even with a physical map? What do you mean when you say you have a poor "sense of direction"? How do we know where we are? How do we use and represent information about space? This book clarifies that our knowledge and feelings emerge as a consequence of our interactions with the surrounding space, and show that the knowledge and feelings direct, guide, or limit our spatial behavior and experience. Space matters, or more specifically space we perceive matters. Research into spatial cognition and experience, asking fundamental questions about how and why space and spatiality matters to humans, has thus attracted attention. It is no coincidence that the 2014 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine was awarded for research into a positioning system in the brain or "inner GPS" and that spatial information and technology are recognized as an important social infrastructure in recent years. This is the first book aimed at graduate and advanced undergraduate students pursuing this fascinating area of research. The content introduces the reader to the field of spatial cognition and experience with a series of chapters covering theoretical, empirical, and practical issues, including cognitive maps, spatial orientation, spatial ability and thinking, geospatial information, navigation assistance, and environmental aesthetics.

Space and Spatial Cognition

Author : Michel Denis
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All living creatures inscribe their activity in space. Human beings acquire knowledge of this space by traversing it, listening to verbal descriptions, and looking at maps, atlases, and digital media. We memorize routes, compare distances mentally, and retrieve our starting place after a long journey. Space and Spatial Cognition provides an up-to-date introduction to the elements of human navigation and the mental representation of our environment. This book explores the mental capacities which enable us to create shortcuts, imagine new pathways, and thus demonstrate our adaptation to the environment. Using a multidisciplinary approach which draws on psychology, neuroscience, geography, architecture and the visual arts, the author presents answers to a number of questions. Which mental capacities do people mobilize when confronted with space? Which brain functions do they implement? How do digital technologies extend these capacities? By presenting space at the crossroads of a number of disciplines, this volume reveals how each of them enhances our understanding of human behaviour in space. Space and Spatial Cognition provides a unique insight into all facets of spatial cognition, including spatial behaviour, language, and future technologies. It will be the ideal companion for all students and researchers in the field.

Human Spatial Memory

Author : Gary L. Allen
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The chapters in Human Spatial Memory: Remembering Where present a fascinating picture of an everyday aspect of mental life that is as intriguing to people outside of academia as it is to scientists studying human cognition and behavior. The questions are as old as the study of mind itself: How do we remember where objects are located? How do we remember where we are in relation to other places? What is the origin and developmental course of spatial memory? What neural structures are involved in remembering where? How do we come to understand scaled-down versions of places as symbolic representations of actual places? Although the questions are old, some of the answers-in-progress are new, thanks to some innovative theorizing, solid experimental work, and revealing applications of new technologies, such as virtual environments and brain imaging techniques. This volume includes a variety of theoretical, empirical, and methodological advances that invite readers to make their own novel connections between theory and research. Scholars who study spatial cognition can benefit from examining the latest from well-established experts, as well as milestone contributions from early-career researchers. This combination provides the reader with a sense of past, present, and future in terms of spatial memory research. Just as important, however, is the value of the volume as a touchstone resource for researchers who study perception, memory, or cognition but who are not concerned primarily with the spatial domain. All readers may find the fact that this volume violates the trend toward an ever-narrowing specialization refreshing. Chapters from cognitive psychologists are alongside chapters by developmentalists and neuroscientists; results from field studies are just pages away from those based on fMRI during observation of virtual displays. Thus, the book invites integrative examination across disciplines, research areas, and methodological approaches.

Applied Spatial Cognition

Author : Gary L. Allen
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Applied Spatial Cognition illustrates the vital link between research and application in spatial cognition. With an impressive vista ranging from applied research to applications of cognitive technology, this volume presents the work of individuals from a wide range of disciplines and research areas, including psychologists, geographers, information scientists, computer scientists, cognitive scientists, engineers, and architects. Chapters throughout the book are a testimony to the importance of basic and applied research regarding human spatial cognition and behavior in the many facets of daily life. The contents are arranged into three sections, the first of which deals with a variety of spatial problems in real-world settings. The second section focuses on spatial cognition in specific populations. The final part is concerned principally with applications of spatial cognitive research and the development of cognitive technology. Relevant to a number of remarkably diverse groups, Applied Spatial Cognition will be of considerable interest to researchers and professionals in industrial/organizational psychology, human factors research, and cognitive science.

Spatial Cognition Spatial Perception

Author : Francine L. Dolins
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An analysis of human and non-human animals' spatial cognitive, perceptual, and behavioural processes through mapping internal and external spatial knowledge.

Historical Epistemology of Space

Author : Matthias Schemmel
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This monograph investigates the development of human spatial knowledge by analyzing its elementary structures and studying how it is further shaped by various societal conditions. By taking a thoroughly historical perspective on knowledge and integrating results from various disciplines, this work throws new light on long-standing problems in epistemology such as the relation between experience and preformed structures of cognition. What do the orientation of apes and the theory of relativity have to do with each other? Readers will learn how different forms of spatial thinking are related in a long-term history of knowledge. Scientific concepts of space such as Newton’s absolute space or Einstein’s curved spacetime are shown to be rooted in pre-scientific structures of knowledge, while at the same time enabling the integration of an ever expanding corpus of experiential knowledge. This work addresses all readers interested in questions of epistemology, in particular philosophers and historians of science. It integrates forms of spatial knowledge from disciplines including anthropology, developmental psychology and cognitive sciences, amongst others.

Space in Mind

Author : Daniel R. Montello
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The current "spatial turn" in many disciplines reflects an emerging scholarly interest in space and spatiality as central components in understanding the natural and cultural worlds. In Space in Mind, leading researchers from a range of disciplines examine the implications of research on spatial thinking and reasoning for education and learning. Their contributions suggest ways in which recent work in such fields as spatial cognition, geographic information systems, linguistics, artificial intelligence, architecture, and data visualization can inform spatial approaches to learning and education.After addressing the conceptual foundations of spatial thinking for education and learning, the book considers visualization, both external (for example, diagrams and maps) and internal (imagery and other mental spatial representations); embodied cognition and spatial understanding; and the development of specific spatial curricula and literacies. ContributorsKinnari Atit, John Bateman, Ruth Conroy Dalton, Ghislain Deslongchamps, Bonnie Dixon, Roger M. Downs, Daniel R. Montello, Christian Freksa, Michael F. Goodchild, Karl Grossner, Mary Hegarty, Scott R. Hinze, Christoph Hölscher, Alycia M. Hund, Donald G. Janelle, Sander Lestrade, Evie Malaia, Nora S. Newcombe, David N. Rapp, Thomas F. Shipley, Holger Schultheis, Mary Jane Shultz, Diana Sinton, Mike Stieff, Thora Tenbrink, Basil Tikoff, Dido Tsigaridi, David Waller, Ranxiao Frances Wang, Ronnie Wilbur, Kenneth C. Williamson, Vickie M. Williamson

The Human Experience of Space and Place

Author : Anne Buttimer
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Humanistic geography is one of the major emerging themes which has recently dominated geographic writing. Anne Buttimer has been one of the leading figures in the rise of humanistic geography, and the research students she collected round her at Clark University in the 1970s constituted something of a ‘school’ of humanistic geographers. This school developed a significantly new style of geographical inquiry, giving special emphasis to people’s experience of place, space and environment and often using philosophical and subjective methodology. This collection of essays, first published in 1980, brings together this school and offers insight into philosophical and practical issues concerning the human experience of environments. An extensive range of topics are discussed, and the aim throughout is to weave analytical and critical thought into a more comprehensive understanding of lived experience. This book will be of interest to students of human geography.

Spatial Cognition V

Author : Thomas Barkowsky
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This book constitutes the refereed proceedings of the International Conference on Spatial Cognition, Spatial Cognition 2006. It covers spatial reasoning, human-robot interaction, visuo-spatial reasoning and spatial dynamics, spatial concepts, human memory, mental reasoning and assistance, spatial concepts, human memory and mental reasoning, navigation, wayfinding and route instructions as well as linguistic and social issues in spatial knowledge processing.

Spatial Cognition and Reasoning

Author : Perry W. Thorndyke
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This paper summarizes several cognitive studies of spatial knowledge processing. The studies investigated the types of representation of spatial knowledge, the techniques individuals use to acquire knowledge from maps, and the differences between the knowledge acquired from maps and navigational experience. Three major conclusions emerge from these studies: (1) People encode several types of spatial knowledge in memory, including images of physical objects, memory of actions and procedures, symbolic abstractions of the environment (e.g., names, distances), and spatial maps; (2) Different types of spatial knowledge are optimal for different tasks (e.g., orienting oneself, estimating distances, reconstructing spatial relations among distant objects); and (3) Individuals vary in their strategies and abilities for acquiring spatial knowledge. (Author).