Search Results for "iceland-land-of-the-sagas"

Iceland

Iceland

Land of the Sagas

  • Author: David Roberts,Jon Krakauer
  • Publisher: Villard Books
  • ISBN: 9780375752674
  • Category: Travel
  • Page: 159
  • View: 5770
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Photographs exploring the grandeur of Iceland's remarkable geography accompany tales of real-life heroes and supernatural beings

The End of Iceland's Innocence

The End of Iceland's Innocence

The Image of Iceland in the Foreign Media During the Financial Crisis

  • Author: Daniel Chartier
  • Publisher: University of Ottawa Press
  • ISBN: 077660760X
  • Category: Business & Economics
  • Page: 239
  • View: 412
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A portrait of Iceland through the eyes of the international media before and after their total economic collapse.

Viking America

Viking America

The First Millennium

  • Author: Geraldine Barnes
  • Publisher: Boydell & Brewer
  • ISBN: 9780859916080
  • Category: History
  • Page: 187
  • View: 3249
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Viking America examined through the writing and rewriting of the Vinland story from the middle ages to the twentieth century.

Feud in the Icelandic Saga

Feud in the Icelandic Saga

  • Author: Jesse L. Byock
  • Publisher: Univ of California Press
  • ISBN: 9780520082595
  • Category: History
  • Page: 293
  • View: 5098
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Byock sees the crucial element in the origin of the Icelandic sagas not as the introduction of writing or the impact of literary borrowings from the continent but the subject of the tales themselves - feud. This simple thesis is developed into a thorough examination of Icelandic society and feud, and of the narrative technique of recounting it.

The Land of Desolation

The Land of Desolation

  • Author: Isaac Israel Hayes
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press
  • ISBN: 1108071473
  • Category: History
  • Page: 372
  • View: 4569
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This 1871 account by a seasoned Arctic explorer recounts a leisurely voyage in 1869 along the coast of Greenland.

The Growth of the Medieval Icelandic Sagas (1180-1280)

The Growth of the Medieval Icelandic Sagas (1180-1280)

  • Author: Theodore Murdock Andersson
  • Publisher: Cornell University Press
  • ISBN: 9780801444081
  • Category: Fiction
  • Page: 237
  • View: 8240
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Andersson introduces readers to the development of the Icelandic sagas between 1180 and 1280, a crucial period that witnessed a gradual shift of emphasis from tales of adventure and personal distinction to the analysis of politics and history.

The Saga of King Hrolf Kraki

The Saga of King Hrolf Kraki

  • Author: Jesse L Byock
  • Publisher: Penguin UK
  • ISBN: 0141914092
  • Category: Fiction
  • Page: 144
  • View: 312
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Composed in medieval Iceland, Hrolf's Saga is one of the greatest of all mythic-legendary sagas, relating half-fantastical events that were said to have occurred in fifth-century Denmark. It tells of the exploits of King Hrolf and of his famous champions, including Bodvar Bjarki, the 'bear-warrior': a powerful figure whose might and bear-like nature are inspired by the same legendary heritage as Beowulf. Depicting a world of wizards, sorceresses and 'berserker' fighters - originally members of a cult of Odin - this is a compelling tale of ancient magic. A work of timeless power and beauty, it offers both a treasury of Icelandic prose and a masterful gathering of epic, cultic memory, traditional folk tale and myths from the Viking age and far earlier.

The Place of Iceland in the History of European Institutions

The Place of Iceland in the History of European Institutions

Being the Lothian Prize Essay, 1877

  • Author: Charles Augustus Vansittart Conybeare
  • Publisher: N.A
  • ISBN: N.A
  • Category: Iceland
  • Page: 148
  • View: 2708
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The Saga of Gunnlaugur Snake's Tongue

The Saga of Gunnlaugur Snake's Tongue

  • Author: E. Paul Durrenberger,Dorothy Durrenberger
  • Publisher: Fairleigh Dickinson Univ Press
  • ISBN: 9780838634653
  • Category: Poetry
  • Page: 124
  • View: 4935
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The fulfilment of a prophetic dream takes a young man from his troubled teenage years in medieval Iceland to his death in a duel with his love rival in a foreign land. Thorsteinn, son of the prominent Egill Skalla-Grimsson, also of saga fame, dreams two men will fight and die over his daughter, and that she will marry a third man. When his father forbids the headstrong Gunnlaugur from traveling to foreign lands, he takes refuge with Thorsteinn, where he studies law and becomes close to his daughter, Helga the fair. At eighteen, the stubborn and proud Gunnlaugur betroths himself to Helga and arranges with her father for her to wait for him for three years while he is away. While abroad, Gunnlaugur gets in and out of trouble with various kings and gains a reputation as both a poet and a warrior. With a show of arrogance at the court of the Swedish king, he makes an enemy of another Icelandic poet, Hrafn, who had befriended him. Having sworn to disgrace Gunnlaugur, Hrafn returns to Iceland to ask for Helga in marriage as the three years she was to wait have passed. Delayed in his travels, Gunnlaugur returns the day of the wedding but can not stop it. Gunnlaugur challenges Hrafn to the last duel ever fought in Iceland, but kinsmen and friends of both prevent the fight. The two travel to Sweden where they meet and fight. Both die as foretold in Thorsteinn's dream. Dreaming of Gunnlaugur, Helga dies in the arms of her second husband, a third poet, as the dream foretold. There the saga ends. In addition to the translation of the saga, this book contains an anthropological analysis of the saga and saga writing in medieval Iceland. Beyond relating events, this saga, like others of its genre, is an expression of the totemic system of the primitive society that produced it, a stratified society without the institutions of a state. The analysis of the saga shows its richly textured patterns of opposition and similarity, its complex analogical logic, and its fascinating mirror-image arrangement of events centering around the fatal insults between Gunnlaugur and Hrafn in Sweden. Since the saga is a product of a totemic society, the authors preserve that dimension in their translation. Rather than trying to smooth over the work to "elevate" it to modern standards of the novel, they preserve the texture of oppositions, similarities, and analogies that make the saga what it is.